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  • 01:01

    Episode 275: Best of John C. Harvey, Jr, ADM USN (Ret.)

    in Military

    We are frmly in the middle of the 2nd decade of the 21st Century. What path were we put on at the start 21st Century that got us here? How do we evaluate the right decisions, the neutral decisions, and the less than optimal calls of the last decade and a half? What lessons can we take away now in order to make decisions to best position the Navy on the approaches to 2030?

    Our guest for the full hour this Sunday to discuss this an much more will be Admiral John C. Harvey, Jr, USN (Ret). 

    Almost a year since he joined the retired ranks, when in uniform Admiral Harvey was one of the of the more engaged, visible, and accessible Flag Officers of his generation - and in retirement he continues to be an influential voice.

    Admiral Harvey was born and raised in Baltimore, MD and is a 1973 graduate of the U S Naval Academy.

    In his thirty-nine year Navy career, he specialized in naval nuclear propulsion, surface ship and carrier strike-group operations and Navy-wide manpower management/personnel policy development.

    He commanded the USS DAVID R RAY (DD 971), the USS CAPE ST GEORGE (CG 71), the THEODORE ROOSEVELT Strike Group/CCDG-8 and also served as the Navy’s 54th Chief of Naval Personnel and as the Director, Navy Staff. 

    Prior to his retirement from the Navy in November, 2012, Admiral Harvey served as Commander, US Fleet Forces Command. He now makes his home in Vienna, Virginia where he resides with his wife, Mary Ellen.


  • 00:55

    Writing a More Just Future: USN Conference in Chicago

    in Education

    This broadcast will feature leaders from the Illinois Writing Project, hosts of the USN Conference in Chicago, Illinois on April 25-26, 2014. These leaders will provide an outline of events and a preview of opportunities for learning and connections promised by the conference.

  • 00:50

    Military Monday With John D. Gresham and Adm. James Stavridis, USN (Ret.)

    in Military

    One of the most distinguished and respected American military officers of the 21st century has been Adm. James Stavridis, USN (Ret.). Today the Dean of the Fletcher School at Tufts University, Adm. Stavridis had an incomparable career in the United States Navy as a surface warfare officer, military staff member, and regional combatant commander. He has also developed an impressive reputation as a military writer and commentator, particularly in the pages of U.S. Naval Institute (USNI) Proceedings, throughout his career and into the present day. In nearly four decades of uninterrupted military service, Adm. Stavridis accumulated a service record that is the very definition of honor and leadership to the United States of America and the world.

    And this week, Military Monday (#MilitaryMonday on the Writrstream Radio Network (@Writestream)) host John D. Gresham (@greshamj01) is this week proud and honored to air an interview with USNI Press (@USNIBooks) author Adm. James Stavridis, USN (Ret.). In a recently recorded interview, Mr. Gresham and Adm. Stavridis discussed a wide variety of topics, from his early days of military service, to his professional writings and use of social media, as well as his wide-ranging responsibilities as regional combatant commander of both US Southern Command (SOUTHCOM) and US European Command (EUCOM). Please tune in on Monday, March 16th, at 1 PM EDT for an intriguing interview with one of the most interesting military commanders of our time.


  • Military Monday with John D. Gresham and Author Al Nofi

    in History

    Question: How do you take a Navy from a force structure of just a handful of wooden cruisers to the most powerful fleet in history in just two generations? Because this is exactly what happened within the United States Navy (USN) in the late 1800s in the first half of the 20th century. Along with obvious answers like having the necessary resources and industrial infrastructure, there is the question of the people who manned it. One of the keys in the development of the USN's training, tactics, and fleet doctrine were 21 "Fleet Problens," run between 1923 and 1940. Fleet Problems were a series of full-scale fleet exercises, designed to explore and experiment new ideas for the US fleet, while providing officers and crews with a chance to operate under simulated battle conditions for extended periods of time. Most of the future World War II and early Cold War USN leaders participated in the Fleet Problems, learning many of the lessons that would allow them to achieve victory in the coming "Two Ocean War" that was coming.

    To learn more about the USN's Fleet Problems prior to World War II, tune into this week's edition of Military Monday (#MilitaryMonday on the Writestream Radio Network (@Writestream)). Author, historian, journalist, documentary filmmaker, and host John D. Gresham (@greshamj01) has invited  Government Printing Office author Al Nofi to discuss his book, TO THE FLEET FOR WAR. Considered an "instant classic" within the Naval history genre, Nofi's book describes in intimate detail, the various Fleet Problems, how they were run and adjudicated, and lessons learned derived from the exercises that became the basis for the USN's World War II doctrine.

  • 01:15

    Military Monday with John D. Gresham With Author RADM Dave Oliver, USN (Ret.)

    in Lifestyle

    Of all the human qualities that are desired by people here in America and around the world right now, there can be little doubt or question that leadership is at the top of that list. Diluted by decades of indifference and mediocrity since the days of the "Greatest Generation" that fought in World War II, leadership as become a quality as rare as 100-carat diamonds and honest politicians. Nevertheless, those of us with long memories do recall touchstone individuals who not only made a difference in their time, but changed the very world they were part of forever. One of these was a somewhat gnomish and often disliked naval officer who created a whole new technology and era literally through the force of his own will: Adm. Hyman G. Rickover, USN.

    Today, Rickover remains something of an enigma to military historians and analysts almost 3 decades after his death. Arguably one of the most brilliant and powerful naval officers of his day, he never commanded great ships and fleets in battle. Able to make other officers and politicians sweat and fear for their professional lives, his actual job for most of his career was to build engines for submarines and surface ships. And while his nuclear engines changed the history of the world, at no time did he ever command a ship powered by one. To learn more about this important figure in U.S. history, join author, historian, journalist, game designer, and documentary filmmaker John D. Gresham (@Greshamj01) for Military Monday (#MilitaryMonday on the Writestream Radio Network (@Writestream)) at 1 PM EDT. His guest this week will be U.S. Naval Institute Press (@USNI_Books) author and career submariner RADM Dave Oliver, USN (Ret.). Oliver is the author of the new book AGAINST THE TIDE, a biographical study of Rickover and his unique leadership and management styles.


  • 01:05

    Episode 262: The fight against malaria with RADM Tim Ziemer, USN (Ret.)

    in Military

    Recently, when one hears of disease and Africa, if you only listened to the media, then what would come to mind would be Ebola.
    That is not the real challenge in Africa. There is a disease that not only kills, it impedes economic growth, interferes with good governance, and as a result is just another catalyst to conflict there and in South Asia.

    To give a better understanding of the ongoing impact of malaria and the fight against it, our guest will be Rear Admiral Tim Ziemer, USN (Ret.)

    Rear Admiral Tim Ziemer was appointed in June 2006 to lead the President's Malaria Initiative (PMI). The PMI strategy is targeted to achieve Africa-wide impact by halving the burden of malaria in 70 percent of at-risk populations in sub-Saharan Africa, approximately 450 million people, thereby removing malaria as a major public health problem and promoting economic growth and development throughout the region.

    PMI is a collaborative U.S. Government effort, led by the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) in conjunction with the Department of Health and Human Services (Center for Disease Control and Prevention), the Department of State, the White House, and others. As coordinator, Rear Admiral Ziemer reports to the USAID administrator and has direct authority over both PMI and USAID malaria programs.

  • Military Monday with John D. Gresham and USNI Press Author Capt. Peter Hayes

    in Military

    Maritime Strategy has really been an American concern over the past century or so, as the United States began to develop its own worldwide empire and interests. It would be World War II and the Cold War that followed before the United States really began to become a dominant force at sea. However, since the end of the Cold War, America has lacked a cohesive maritime strategy, as US diplomacy and military operations haven't jumped from crisis to crisis. So as the United States prepares to elect a new president in 2016, it is well worth considering what sort of maritime strategy America wants as it moves into the middle of the 21st century.

    To learn more about new developments in 21st century maritime strategy, tune into this week's Military Monday (#MilitaryMonday on the Writestream Radio Network (@Writestream)). Author, historian, journalist, documentary filmmaker, and host John D. Gresham (@greshamj01) has invited Naval Institute Press (@USNI_Books) author Capt. Peter Haynes, USN (@haynes_pd) to discuss his new book, Towards a New Maritime Strategy. His new book is a study of how America has developed and implemented maritime strategy over the past hundred years, and where it is probably headed in the next few decades.

  • 01:56

    Too Little . . . Too Late: Our Nations Colors at Half-Mast

    in Politics

    Finally after extreme pressure the Administration relents and lowers our Nations Colors at half-mast . . . My question is:  Why did it take 5 days to do it.  ALL flags should have been lowered that afternoon on the 16th.  This adminstration is a disgrace and a down right repugnant to OUR way of life.  

    In the times we are living in today . . . There is NO excuse why our Marines have to call a cop to defend themselves.  We don't need every member in the military carrying loaded weapons at all times, that would be impractable, but we do need a certain degree of them at the ready at ALL times.  Hell, even the damn Boy Scouts are more prepared nowadays than our own military.  And its all due to this adminstrrations disdain for this country!


  • 01:03

    Episode 238: The Horn of Africa - still the front lines, with RDML Krongard, USN

    in Military

    A special time this week, 2pm Eastern, in order to have a reasonable time for our guest on the other side of the world.

    This week we are going to visit an AOR that may have dropped of a lot of people's scan, but in the Long War - it is still the front lines; the Horn of Africa.

    Somalia, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Kenya, and the waters around the Arabian Peninsular - from terrorism to piracy - America and her allies and partners are at work every day to keep the beast over there, and not here.

    Our guest for the full hour will be Rear Adm. Alexander L. Krongard, USN, Deputy Commander, Combined Joint Task Force-Horn of Africa at Camp Lemonnier, Djibouti, Africa. In this position, he supports the CJTF-HOA Commander to counter violent extremism in East Africa, foster regional security cooperation, strengthen partner nation security capability, and build and maintain U.S. strategic access in the region. Krongard is also responsible for developing relations with senior military leaders in African partner nations and directing CJTF staff and subordinate commanders’ support to deployed personnel and units of all Services across the Horn of Africa. DCJTF-HOA.

    A Navy SEAL by training, RDML Krongard is a graduate of Princeton University and the National War College.

  • 01:03

    Episode 241: Personnel Policy & Leadership, with VADM Bill Moran, USN

    in Military

    How does policy shape, limit, or empower the effectiveness of command at the unit level? Which policies are a net positive, and which ones are counter productive? Are there things we can do to better balance larger Navy goals with the requirement to give leaders the room they need to be effective leaders? 

    In times of austere budgets, can you both reduce end-strength while at the same time retain your best personnel? Are we a learning institution that can adjust policy that answers the bell from DC in shaping tomorrow's Fleet, yet does not break trust with Shipmates? 

    To discuss this and more we will have as our returning guest, Vice Admiral Bill Moran, USN. Chief of Naval Personnel. A P-3 pilot by trade, he held commanded at the squadron, wing and group levels. As Chief of Naval Personnel, he oversees the recruiting, personnel management, training, and development of Navy personnel. Since taking over a year ago he has focused on improving communication between Navy leadership and Sailors in the Fleet.

  • 01:03

    Episode 245: The Carrier as Capital Ship with RADM Thomas Moore, USN, PEO CVN

    in Military

    In a time of budgetary pressure, a shrinking fleet, and an ongoing discussion of their relevance, how are we keeping out legacy Aircraft Carrier's in shape for the regular demands for extended deployments while at the same time bringing the new FORD Class CVN online?

    What are some of the lessons we have learned in our decades of operating nuclear powered aircraft carriers that we are bring forward to serve the Fleet in the coming decades so we always have an answer to the question, "Where are the aircraft carriers?"

    To discuss this and more, our guest for the full hour will be Rear Admiral Thomas J. Moore, USN, Program Executive Officer for Aircraft Carriers and is responsible for life cycle management for In-Service Carriers as well as the design and construction of the Future Class Carriers.