• 00:31

    Part 9: Close-Up Talk Radio w/ Virginia French, PharmD

    in Health

    Wichita, KS – Visit your local pharmacy to pick up a prescription and most likely it will come with information warning you how the drugs may interact with other drugs you take. Though this information seems basic, it is extremely necessary. If a doctor makes a mistake, the consequences could be severe.


    35 years ago the understanding of how drugs interact with each other wasn’t as sophisticated as it is today. This was also true in most of the state of Kansas. That changed when Virginia “Ginger” French became the first doctor of pharmacy in the state of Kansas.


    “There used to be a saying: ‘If you’re going to Kansas, set your watch back 20 years,’" says French. "Pharmacy departments were very different then. It wasn’t as scientific as it is now, which put people at risk for no reason”


    A trailblazing pharmacist and educator, French has personally seen the evolution of her field. In many ways she has been responsible for it.


    “You have to be very detail oriented to be a good pharmacist. It requires precise calculations,” says French. “I’m just fascinated by this information and I want to do the right thing so I put the time into it. I also enjoy sharing what I have learned.”


    As a doctor of pharmacy (or PharmD), French understood the chemistry and the physiology, the drug and the patient. She bears the distinction of being the first clinical pharmacist ever to round with physicians in Kansas, as far as she knows.


    Though an injury forced Dr. French to resign from her position in late 2010, today she is a seasoned investor for French and French, LLC, applying the same scientific approach to her investments she did as a PharmD.  French’s portfolio includes some major pharmaceutical companies as well as companies developing speculative drugs that could one day help millions.

  • 00:36

    Part 8: Close-Up Talk Radio w/ Virginia French, PharmD

    in Health

    Wichita, KS – Visit your local pharmacy to pick up a prescription and most likely it will come with information warning you how the drugs may interact with other drugs you take. Though this information seems basic, it is extremely necessary. If a doctor makes a mistake, the consequences could be severe.


    35 years ago the understanding of how drugs interact with each other wasn’t as sophisticated as it is today. This was also true in most of the state of Kansas. That changed when Virginia “Ginger” French became the first doctor of pharmacy in the state of Kansas.


    “There used to be a saying: ‘If you’re going to Kansas, set your watch back 20 years,’" says French. "Pharmacy departments were very different then. It wasn’t as scientific as it is now, which put people at risk for no reason”


    A trailblazing pharmacist and educator, French has personally seen the evolution of her field. In many ways she has been responsible for it.


    “You have to be very detail oriented to be a good pharmacist. It requires precise calculations,” says French. “I’m just fascinated by this information and I want to do the right thing so I put the time into it. I also enjoy sharing what I have learned.”


    As a doctor of pharmacy (or PharmD), French understood the chemistry and the physiology, the drug and the patient. She bears the distinction of being the first clinical pharmacist ever to round with physicians in Kansas, as far as she knows.


    Though an injury forced Dr. French to resign from her position in late 2010, today she is a seasoned investor for French and French, LLC, applying the same scientific approach to her investments she did as a PharmD.  French’s portfolio includes some major pharmaceutical companies as well as companies developing speculative drugs that could one day help millions.

  • 00:31

    Part 5: Close-Up Talk Radio w/ Virginia French, PharmD

    in Health

    Wichita, KS – Visit your local pharmacy to pick up a prescription and most likely it will come with information warning you how the drugs may interact with other drugs you take. Though this information seems basic, it is extremely necessary. If a doctor makes a mistake, the consequences could be severe.
    35 years ago the understanding of how drugs interact with each other wasn’t as sophisticated as it is today. This was also true in most of the state of Kansas. That changed when Virginia “Ginger” French became the first doctor of pharmacy in the state of Kansas.
    “There used to be a saying: ‘If you’re going to Kansas, set your watch back 20 years,’" says French. "Pharmacy departments were very different then. It wasn’t as scientific as it is now, which put people at risk for no reason”
    A trailblazing pharmacist and educator, French has personally seen the evolution of her field. In many ways she has been responsible for it.
    “You have to be very detail oriented to be a good pharmacist. It requires precise calculations,” says French. “I’m just fascinated by this information and I want to do the right thing so I put the time into it. I also enjoy sharing what I have learned.”
    As a doctor of pharmacy (or PharmD), French understood the chemistry and the physiology, the drug and the patient. She bears the distinction of being the first clinical pharmacist ever to round with physicians in Kansas, as far as she knows.
    Though an injury forced Dr. French to resign from her position in late 2010, today she is a seasoned investor for French and French, LLC, applying the same scientific approach to her investments she did as a PharmD.  French’s portfolio includes some major pharmaceutical companies as well as companies developing speculative drugs that could one day help millions.

  • 00:30

    Part 6: Close-Up Talk Radio w/ Virginia French, PharmD

    in Health

    Wichita, KS – Visit your local pharmacy to pick up a prescription and most likely it will come with information warning you how the drugs may interact with other drugs you take. Though this information seems basic, it is extremely necessary. If a doctor makes a mistake, the consequences could be severe.


    35 years ago the understanding of how drugs interact with each other wasn’t as sophisticated as it is today. This was also true in most of the state of Kansas. That changed when Virginia “Ginger” French became the first doctor of pharmacy in the state of Kansas.


    “There used to be a saying: ‘If you’re going to Kansas, set your watch back 20 years,’" says French. "Pharmacy departments were very different then. It wasn’t as scientific as it is now, which put people at risk for no reason”


    A trailblazing pharmacist and educator, French has personally seen the evolution of her field. In many ways she has been responsible for it.


    “You have to be very detail oriented to be a good pharmacist. It requires precise calculations,” says French. “I’m just fascinated by this information and I want to do the right thing so I put the time into it. I also enjoy sharing what I have learned.”


    As a doctor of pharmacy (or PharmD), French understood the chemistry and the physiology, the drug and the patient. She bears the distinction of being the first clinical pharmacist ever to round with physicians in Kansas, as far as she knows.


    Though an injury forced Dr. French to resign from her position in late 2010, today she is a seasoned investor for French and French, LLC, applying the same scientific approach to her investments she did as a PharmD.  French’s portfolio includes some major pharmaceutical companies as well as companies developing speculative drugs that could one day help millions.

  • 00:31

    Part 7: Close-Up Talk Radio w/ Virginia French, PharmD

    in Health

    Wichita, KS – Visit your local pharmacy to pick up a prescription and most likely it will come with information warning you how the drugs may interact with other drugs you take. Though this information seems basic, it is extremely necessary. If a doctor makes a mistake, the consequences could be severe.


    35 years ago the understanding of how drugs interact with each other wasn’t as sophisticated as it is today. This was also true in most of the state of Kansas. That changed when Virginia “Ginger” French became the first doctor of pharmacy in the state of Kansas.


    “There used to be a saying: ‘If you’re going to Kansas, set your watch back 20 years,’" says French. "Pharmacy departments were very different then. It wasn’t as scientific as it is now, which put people at risk for no reason”


    A trailblazing pharmacist and educator, French has personally seen the evolution of her field. In many ways she has been responsible for it.


    “You have to be very detail oriented to be a good pharmacist. It requires precise calculations,” says French. “I’m just fascinated by this information and I want to do the right thing so I put the time into it. I also enjoy sharing what I have learned.”


    As a doctor of pharmacy (or PharmD), French understood the chemistry and the physiology, the drug and the patient. She bears the distinction of being the first clinical pharmacist ever to round with physicians in Kansas, as far as she knows.


    Though an injury forced Dr. French to resign from her position in late 2010, today she is a seasoned investor for French and French, LLC, applying the same scientific approach to her investments she did as a PharmD.  French’s portfolio includes some major pharmaceutical companies as well as companies developing speculative drugs that could one day help millions.

  • 00:30

    Part 4: Close-Up Talk Radio w/ Virginia French, PharmD

    in Health

    Wichita, KS – Visit your local pharmacy to pick up a prescription and most likely it will come with information warning you how the drugs may interact with other drugs you take. Though this information seems basic, it is extremely necessary. If a doctor makes a mistake, the consequences could be severe.
    35 years ago the understanding of how drugs interact with each other wasn’t as sophisticated as it is today. This was also true in most of the state of Kansas. That changed when Virginia “Ginger” French became the first doctor of pharmacy in the state of Kansas.
    “There used to be a saying: ‘If you’re going to Kansas, set your watch back 20 years,’" says French. "Pharmacy departments were very different then. It wasn’t as scientific as it is now, which put people at risk for no reason”
    A trailblazing pharmacist and educator, French has personally seen the evolution of her field. In many ways she has been responsible for it.
    “You have to be very detail oriented to be a good pharmacist. It requires precise calculations,” says French. “I’m just fascinated by this information and I want to do the right thing so I put the time into it. I also enjoy sharing what I have learned.”
    As a doctor of pharmacy (or PharmD), French understood the chemistry and the physiology, the drug and the patient. She bears the distinction of being the first clinical pharmacist ever to round with physicians in Kansas, as far as she knows.
    Though an injury forced Dr. French to resign from her position in late 2010, today she is a seasoned investor for French and French, LLC, applying the same scientific approach to her investments she did as a PharmD.  French’s portfolio includes some major pharmaceutical companies as well as companies developing speculative drugs that could one day help millions.

  • 00:31

    Part 2: Close-Up Talk Radio w/ Virginia French, PharmD

    in Science

    Wichita, KS – Visit your local pharmacy to pick up a prescription and most likely it will come with information warning you how the drugs may interact with other drugs you take. Though this information seems basic, it is extremely necessary. If a doctor makes a mistake, the consequences could be severe.
    35 years ago the understanding of how drugs interact with each other wasn’t as sophisticated as it is today. This was also true in most of the state of Kansas. That changed when Virginia “Ginger” French became the first doctor of pharmacy in the state of Kansas.
    “There used to be a saying: ‘If you’re going to Kansas, set your watch back 20 years,’" says French. "Pharmacy departments were very different then. It wasn’t as scientific as it is now, which put people at risk for no reason”
    A trailblazing pharmacist and educator, French has personally seen the evolution of her field. In many ways she has been responsible for it.
    “You have to be very detail oriented to be a good pharmacist. It requires precise calculations,” says French. “I’m just fascinated by this information and I want to do the right thing so I put the time into it. I also enjoy sharing what I have learned.”
    As a doctor of pharmacy (or PharmD), French understood the chemistry and the physiology, the drug and the patient. She bears the distinction of being the first clinical pharmacist ever to round with physicians in Kansas, as far as she knows.
    Though an injury forced Dr. French to resign from her position in late 2010, today she is a seasoned investor for French and French, LLC, applying the same scientific approach to her investments she did as a PharmD.  French’s portfolio includes some major pharmaceutical companies as well as companies developing speculative drugs that could one day help millions.

  • 00:30

    Part 3: Close-Up Talk Radio w/ Virginia French, PharmD

    in Science

    Wichita, KS – Visit your local pharmacy to pick up a prescription and most likely it will come with information warning you how the drugs may interact with other drugs you take. Though this information seems basic, it is extremely necessary. If a doctor makes a mistake, the consequences could be severe.
    35 years ago the understanding of how drugs interact with each other wasn’t as sophisticated as it is today. This was also true in most of the state of Kansas. That changed when Virginia “Ginger” French became the first doctor of pharmacy in the state of Kansas.
    “There used to be a saying: ‘If you’re going to Kansas, set your watch back 20 years,’" says French. "Pharmacy departments were very different then. It wasn’t as scientific as it is now, which put people at risk for no reason”
    A trailblazing pharmacist and educator, French has personally seen the evolution of her field. In many ways she has been responsible for it.
    “You have to be very detail oriented to be a good pharmacist. It requires precise calculations,” says French. “I’m just fascinated by this information and I want to do the right thing so I put the time into it. I also enjoy sharing what I have learned.”
    As a doctor of pharmacy (or PharmD), French understood the chemistry and the physiology, the drug and the patient. She bears the distinction of being the first clinical pharmacist ever to round with physicians in Kansas, as far as she knows.
    Though an injury forced Dr. French to resign from her position in late 2010, today she is a seasoned investor for French and French, LLC, applying the same scientific approach to her investments she did as a PharmD.  French’s portfolio includes some major pharmaceutical companies as well as companies developing speculative drugs that could one day help millions.

  • 00:21

    Pharmacy Podcast Episode 158 Pharmacy Future Leaders Brahim Shettima PharmD

    in Business

    Pharmacy Future Leaders Episode:
    Brahim Shettima PharmD, RPh
    Student Pharmacist with strong interests in research, policy, and advocacy for the profession, engaged in Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experiences and exploring opportunities in the pharmaceutical industry.
    Member

  • 00:31

    Close-Up Talk Radio spotlights Virginia French, PharmD

    in Science

    Wichita, KS – Visit your local pharmacy to pick up a prescription and most likely it will come with information warning you how the drugs may interact with other drugs you take. Though this information seems basic, it is extremely necessary. If a doctor makes a mistake, the consequences could be severe.
    35 years ago the understanding of how drugs interact with each other wasn’t as sophisticated as it is today. This was especially true in the state of Kansas. That all changed when Virginia “Ginger” French became the first doctor of pharmacy in the state of Kansas.
    “There’s a saying: ‘If you’re going to Kansas, set your watch back 20 years.’ says French. “Pharmacy departments were very different. It wasn’t as scientific which put people at risk for no reason.”
    A trailblazing pharmacist and educator, French has personally seen the evolution of her field. In many ways she has been responsible for it.
    “You have to be very detail oriented to be a pharmacist. It requires precise calculations,” says French. “I’m just fascinated by this information and I want to do the right thing so I put the time into it.”
    As a doctor of pharmacy (or PharmD), French understood both the chemistry and the physiology, the drug and the patient. French bears the distinction of being the first pharmacist ever to round with physicians.
    Though an injury forced French to retire from her position in 2010, today she is a seasoned investor for French and French, applying the same scientific approach to her investments she did as a PharmD. While her investments are diversified, with her firsthand knowledge of the various stages of clinical investigation and medical research, French’s portfolio includes some major pharmaceutical companies as well as speculative drugs that could one day help millions.

  • 00:13

    Pharmacy Podcast Episode 168 The Impact of Pharmacy Automation – Jenna Wahlstrom PharmD

    in Business

    We talk with Jenna Wahlstrom Pharm D. 

    Jenna works at Larsen Service Drug who opened their doors in 1952.

    The family business was founded by John O. Larsen. His son Larry Larsen currently owns and operates the business. Their full service pharmacy is ready to provide patients with the highest quality care. Larsen Service Drug also has a location in New Town, North Dakota. Their New Town store offers complete pharmacy services as well as a variety of over-the-counter products.

    Larsen believes in leveraging great pharmacy technology. Kirby Lester is a important partner to our business. Larsen also offers telepharmacy services that allow customers to interact with a pharmacist through video conference equipment on days where a pharmacist is not on site. 

    Larry Larsen, R.Ph. Larry Larsen obtained his pharmacy degree from North Dakota State University. After graduation, he returned to Watford City to eventually take over the family business. Larry acts as the chief pharmacist, managing the day to day activities of the pharmacy.

    Debbie Larsen Debbie Larsen started her working career in the cards and candy department at Norby's Department Store in Grand Forks, North Dakota. After obtaining a degree in Elementary Education and teaching for three years, she returned to the retail business. Debbie keeps the business on track as the bookkeeper. She also helps keep the store stocked with new and exciting merchandise as the head buyer.

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