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  • 01:48

    Military Monday with John D. Gresham and Daria DiGiovanni – A Dozen Shows

    in Military

    Happy New Year Military Monday listeners! As we begin our fourth year of broadcasting, it seems like good time to look back over our growing body of work, and pick out some of the best of it to share with listeners. So to start 2016, join us on Military Monday (#MilitaryMonday on the Writestream Radio Network(@Writestream)) with military historian, author and journalist John D. Gresham (@greshamj01) at 1 p.m. Eastern for a  special broadcast celebrating the shows and guests that we consider to have been our best. Writestream Radio Network founder, author and host Dariaanne DiGiovanni (@dariaanne) will join him on the air to provide commentary, and talk with John about the shows, and how he reaches out to invite guests and develop shows for Military Monday. In addition, listeners are encouraged to call in and talk to both John and Daria about the business of Internet radio, and how it is rapidly growing in both popularity and market penetration.

  • 01:32

    Military Monday Replay – Guns of Outlaws

    in Military

    Due to a last-minute guest cancellation, today's edition of Military Monday (#MilitaryMonday today at 1 PM EST on the Writestream Radio Netwok (@Writestream)) will be a replay of last week's highly enjoyable show about the firearms of American outlaws/gangsters with Zenith Press (@Zenith_Press) authors Gerry and Janet Souter. And we hope you will join us next week for our next live show at 1 p.m. Eastern.


    http://www.blogtalkradio.com/writestream/2015/01/26/military-monday-replay-guns-of-outlaws

  • 01:06

    She's Gone Country w/the CBCowgirls NFR 2015 3 Military Monday FoRe! Radio

    in Lifestyle

    "She's Gone Country" with the CB Cowgirls 


    Join us as we talk LIVE from the NFR 2015 3
    Military Monday 
    Monday 6:00pm pt


    ~Back to our roots!  
    www.ShesGoneCountry.us
    Call to listen in only or join the conversation! 
    (347) 857-3760 on www.FoReRadio.com


    Hosts - Becky & Vicki Christensen 
    Guest Co-Hosts: Donnalyn Quintana, Cody Custer 
    Producer - Maria DiGiovanni
    Executive Producer - FoRe! Living Royal Productions

    FoRe! Charity TEAM of Choice - *Western Wishes
    www.WesternWishes.org 


    Thank You to our Show Sponsors
    Les Schwab Tires
    Ambassador Coaching
    *Tres Rios Trophy Buckles
    FoRe! Living Royal Productions


    Thank You to our Station Sponsors:
    *Higher Ascent/BRAME.BIZ
    *Modern American Dentistry
    BMB Builders & Remodeling
    *RLL/The Ambassador Program
    *Debra Osborne - Coldwell Banker Beachside

    FoRe! Radio™ is a Media/PR Platform owned and operated by FoRe! International  www.FoReRadio.com
    a www.LivingRoyalProductions.com

  • 01:30

    Military Monday Replay with John D. Gresham and Sandy Grimes – Circle of Treason

    in History

    Due to the Columbus Day holiday, we'll be replaying our 2014 interview with CIA operative and counterintelligence officer, Sandra Grimes, who helped hunt down Soviet spy Alderich Ames. The story is compelling...


    As the Cold War was ending in the late 1980s, Americans might have been justified in thinking that their intelligence services were winning the clandestine spy battles across the globe. In fact, the U.S. was losing badly, despite the multiple arrests for espionage during 1985, known as “The Year of the Spy.” In fact, out of the arrests came a new generation of enemy operatives, and one of the worst of these was Aldrich "Rick" Ames. Working out of the CIA's Soviet Counterintelligence Group at their headquarters in Langley, Virginia, Ames had access to virtually everything CIA knew about the USSR, including America's own deep cover assets. In 1985,  Ames approached a Soviet contact in Washington, DC, and began his career as one of America's most deadly spies. For approximately $4.2 million from the Soviets, Ames turned over the identities of over a dozen American assets within the USSR, most of whom were immediately executed. Realizing that they had a “mole” inside “The Company," CIA mobilized a small and highly experienced group of operatives to hunt down the trader in their midst.


    To learn more about the molehunt for Aldrich Ames, join military/intelligence historian, author and journalist John D. Gresham for Military Monday at 1 p.m. Eastern. His guest this week is former CIA case officer Sandy Grimes, co-author of the U.S. Naval Institute Press (@USNIPress) book CIRCLE OF TREASON. Together they will take listeners through the story of how Ames was hunted down and captured, along with just how much damage he did to the United States and its allies during his tenure as a Soviet spy.

  • Military Monday with John D. Gresham and Author Al Nofi

    in History

    Question: How do you take a Navy from a force structure of just a handful of wooden cruisers to the most powerful fleet in history in just two generations? Because this is exactly what happened within the United States Navy (USN) in the late 1800s in the first half of the 20th century. Along with obvious answers like having the necessary resources and industrial infrastructure, there is the question of the people who manned it. One of the keys in the development of the USN's training, tactics, and fleet doctrine were 21 "Fleet Problens," run between 1923 and 1940. Fleet Problems were a series of full-scale fleet exercises, designed to explore and experiment new ideas for the US fleet, while providing officers and crews with a chance to operate under simulated battle conditions for extended periods of time. Most of the future World War II and early Cold War USN leaders participated in the Fleet Problems, learning many of the lessons that would allow them to achieve victory in the coming "Two Ocean War" that was coming.


    To learn more about the USN's Fleet Problems prior to World War II, tune into this week's edition of Military Monday (#MilitaryMonday on the Writestream Radio Network (@Writestream)). Author, historian, journalist, documentary filmmaker, and host John D. Gresham (@greshamj01) has invited  Government Printing Office author Al Nofi to discuss his book, TO THE FLEET FOR WAR. Considered an "instant classic" within the Naval history genre, Nofi's book describes in intimate detail, the various Fleet Problems, how they were run and adjudicated, and lessons learned derived from the exercises that became the basis for the USN's World War II doctrine.

  • Military Monday with John D. Gresham and Zenith Press Author T.J. Mullen

    in History

    Whether you like them or not, guns are probably the most significant devices ever produced during man's industrial era here on earth. In a merger of modern metallurgy and chemistry, firearms have been among the most extreme engineering achievements in the history of the human race. But along with the technical achievements represented by guns, there have also been the consequences and social responsibilities that have gone with them. More and bloodier wars have been using firearms, than all other weapons previously developed by mankind. And today, given the greater media exposure of gun violence to the general public, the right to own and possess firearms has become a matter of international controversy. In between these two realities, is a gun culture which truly enjoys and marels at the qualities and variety of firearms across the world. And as might be imagined, many people have their individual favorite guns.


    But whatever your preferences, you're probably going to enjoy the subject of this week's Military Monday (#MilitaryMonday on the Writestream Radio Network (@Writestream)). Author, historian, journalist, documentary filmmaker, and host John D. Gresham (@greshamj01) has invited Zenith Press author T.J. Mullen to discuss his new book, 365 Guns You Must Shoot. Part of a new series that Zenith Press is rolling out this summer, 365 Guns is a compendium of some of the greatest firearms ever created, from nations all over the world. Certainly, you're in for a lively hour of guns, opinions, and favorites!

  • Military Monday with John D. Gresham

    in Military

    Join military historian, author and journalist John D. Gresham for Military Monday at 1 p.m. Eastern.

  • 01:27

    Military Monday Veterans Day Special with USNI Press Author/Poet Victoria Kelly

    in Military

    As we prepare to celebrate Veterans Day, it is important to remember that our service personnel through the decades, did not undergo their military service alone. From the first muster of the Minutemen in April 1775, until the present day, our servicemen and women frequently have waiting for them at home, family, spouses, and loved ones. Today however, military spouses and loved ones undergo their own unique experiences as they remain home, while their soldiers, sailors, airmen, and Marines go off to the other side of the world, and often into war.


     But just how happens to a military wife when, "the men go off to war?" While there have been a handful of books on the subject over the past several decades, there is a greater question to be asked. Just what does it feel like to send "your other half" off to an uncertain duty in a foreign land? Especially one that could potentially force they and their families to pay "their last full measure" to America? Often sentences and paragraphs in books something do not convey the feelings of military spouses, which is why we will turn to poetry this week.


    To learn more about the poetry and thoughts of contemporary militiary wives, tune into this week's special Veteran's Day edition of Military Monday (#MilitaryMonday on the Writestream Radio Network (@Writestream)) at 1 PM EST. Author, historian, journalist, documentary filmmaker, and host John D. Gresham (@greshamj01) has invited U.S. Naval Institute Press (@USNIBooks) author and poet Victoria Kelly (@vkellybooks) to discuss her new book of poetry, WHEN THE MEN GO OFF TO WAR. John will be joined bt Writestream Radio Network founder Daria DiGivanni (@Dariaanne) and Donna Lyons- McClellan (@Donnalyons), herself an author and military spouse.

  • 01:43

    Military Monday with John D. Gresham and USNI Press Author Charles Neimeyer

    in History

    The War of 1812, was one of America's "small and forgotten" conflicts, much like the Korea in the 20th century. Ill advised, and really unnecessary for both Great Britain and the young United States of America (which was less than 50 years old at the time), the War of 1912 was a conflict that gained neither side much benefit, and diverted badly needed resources from other endeavors. Nevertheless, there were a number of intriguing and important lessons to be learned from the conflict, none more interesting than those derived from the British Chesapeake Campaign of 1814. A British squadron under command of Adm. Cochrane, raised habit for most of 1814 from the Virginia Tidewater to the waters around Baltimore, doing a surprising amount of damage and raising havoc against the seemingly hapless Americans. The British squadron took and burned Hampton, VA, portions of Washington, DC, and other towns along the bay, eventually only being stopped by the heroic defense of Baltimore and bombardment of Fort McHenry. It is a fascinating story, little known by most Americans, which almost went unnoticed during the recent bicentennial of the War of 1812.


    To learn more about the War of 1812 and the 1814 Chesapeake Campaign, tune into this week's edition of Military Monday (#MilitaryMonday on the Writestream Radio Network (@Writestream)) at 1 PM EDT. Author, historian, journalist, documentary filmmaker, and host John D. Gresham (@greshamj01) has invited Naval Institute Press (@USNIBooks) author LCOL. Charles Neimeyer. , USMC (Ret.) to discuss his new book, War in the Chesapeake. His book is a new single-volume history of the campaign, and will prove enlightening for both academics and those new to the story.

  • 01:07

    Military Monday with USNI Press Author Norman Polmar – HUNTERS AND KILLERS

    in History

    Since the first submarine attacks in 1776, naval warfare professionals have been trying to find effective counters to the threat posed by submersible warships. In the two and a half-centuries since those first underwater assaults, submarines have become arguably the most powerful and dangerous warships in history. In particular, the submarine campaigns of World War I and II nearly strangled Great Britain twice, and was a key factor in that the defeat of Imperial Japan. The resulting response was the development of a new kind of military action: Antisubmarine Warfare (ASW). Just over 100 years old, ASW is a combination of tactics, technologies, platforms (ships and aircraft), weapons, and intelligence fusion which seeks not just to destroy enemy submarines, but also their infrastructure and ability to operate. At best difficult, tedious, dangerous, ASW is an essential part of naval warfare today. Doing it badly or not at all is almost a guarantee of defeat when facing an enemy equipped with submarines.


    To learn more about the development and history of ASW, tune into this week's edition of Military Monday (#MilitaryMonday on the Writestream Radio Network (@Writestream)) at 1 PM EST. Author, historian, journalist, documentary filmmaker, and host John D. Gresham (@greshamj01) has invited respected U.S. Naval Institute Press (@USNIBooks) author Norman Polmar to discuss his new book, HUNTERS AND KILLERS, VOLUME1. The first of two volumes on ASW with co-author Edward Whitman, HUNTERS AND KILLLERS is a detailed examination and history of submarine hunting that covers Up to mid 1943. Listeners are encouraged to call in and ask questions of Mr. Polmar, in what will be a rare live media appearance.

  • 01:54

    Military Monday with USNI Press Author Nick Sambaluk – THE OTHER SPACE RACE

    in History

    The 1960s race to the moon between the United States and Soviet Union was one of the most exciting and technologically stimulating events of the Cold War. But what very few people know, is that in the 1950s Pres. Dwight Eisenhower was running a similar race with the USSR, to gain control of the upper atmosphere and low Earth orbit in space as the new "high ground" for military and intelligence operations. Even before Ike became president in 1953, US military planners had been considering the potential uses of extremely high-altitude flight and Earth orbit, and had a surprisingly good set of ideas to work with. But Eisenhower, deeply concerned over the intelligence "black holes" behind the Iron and Bamboo Curtains, needed certainty about the intentions of the Communist world to help the United States avoid a deeply costly strategic arms race during his tenure in the White House. What followed was one of the most impressive periods of technological development in the history of mankind, with Earth orbiting satellites and remote sensing technologies coming to the forefront.


    To learn more about Pres. Eisenhower's secret race to space in the 1950s, tune into this week's edition of Military Monday (#MilitaryMonday on the Writestream Radio Network (@Writestream)) at 1 PM EST. Author, historian, journalist, documentary filmmaker, and host John D. Gresham (@greshamj01) has invited U.S. Naval Institute Press (@USNIBooks) author Nick Sambaluk (@HistoryNContext) to discuss his new book, THE OTHER SPACEV RACE.