• Military Monday with John D. Gresham and Journalist Donna Lyons

    in Military

    2014 has been a rough year for military personnel and members of the veterans community. The year began with a budget crisis, following a government shutdown and over five years without a signed and approved Federal Budget. And while some sense of fiscal responsibility seems to have finally come to the White House and Congress, things for those who still serve, and have served, continue to go from bad to worse. Forced drawdowns of active-duty military personnel continue, despite escalations of enemy action in places like Afghanistan, Iraq, and Syria. The Department of Veterans Affairs, despite the firing of its top leadership and years of saying that they are, "working the problems," in fact was proven in 2014 to be a criminally corrupt and morally bankrupt organization totally failing in their chartered mission. And as if to punctuate the continuing downward spiral for individuals who serve and have served, service/veterans benefits continue to be eroded in the Fiscal Year 2015 budget, which offers only a paltry 1% pay increase to those who go into harms way for America.


    To get a better sense of just what military personnel and veterans will be facing in the coming year, join military historian, author and journalist John D. Gresham (@Greshamj01) for Military Monday at 1 p.m. Eastern. His guest co-host this week will be journalist Donna Lyons. Herself a military/veterans spouse, Ms. Lyons writes extensively about the service/veterans community, and has her own intriguing observations regarding their present day experiences and service. Callers are encouraged to call in and offer questions and opinions to Mr. Gresham and Ms. Lyons, in an hour that we are dedicating to those who serve, those who have served, and those who will serve. Please join us.

  • 01:13

    Military Monday with John D. Gresham With Zenith Press Author Piers Bizony

    in Military

    For people who grew up in the middle of the 20th Century, space travel/exploration has been something of a disappointment since the lunar landings of the late 1960s and early 1970s. The promises of commercial space travel, promoted in such feature films as Stanley Kubrick's 2001: A SPACE ODDESSY have never been realized, and man's toehold in space has been limited to near-earth ventures like the International Space Station (ISS) and the American Space Shuttle program that was shut down several years ago. In a word, disappointing.


    However, the 21st Century has finally begun to deliver on the promises made by people like President John F. Kennedy and Werner von Braun, thanks to a number of pioneering commercial space ventures that are rapidly beginning to deliver results. Companies like Orbital Sciences and SpaceX, are already providing resupply and retrieval services to NASA for the ISS. And sometime in 2017, SpaceX will fly their first manned mission aboard their own U.S.-built Falcon 9 rocket. These rapid and well conceived programs have not gone without incident however, as demonstrated by the recent accidents involving Orbital Sciences and Virgin Galactic's boosters and spacecraft. Nevertheless, these bold ventures, led by men like Richard Branson and Elon Musk are pushing ahead, and look to be back sometime in 2015.


    To learn more about the coming revolution in commercial space projects, join military historian, author and journalist John D. Gresham (@greshamj01) i for Military Monday at 1 p.m. Eastern. His guest this week is Zenith Press (@Zenith_Press) author Piers Biznoy, and they be discussing his new book. NEW SPACE FRONTIERS. Together they will discuss the current crop of commercial space ventures, recent setbacks and successes, and the long-term viability of space as a commercial enterprise arena.

  • 00:38

    Military Monday with John D. Gresham With Zenith Press Author Piers Gizony

    in Military

    For people who grew up in the middle of the 20th Century, space travel/exploration has been something of a disappointment since the lunar landings of the late 1960s and early 1970s. The promises of commercial space travel, promoted in such feature films as Stanley Kubrick's 2001: A SPACE ODDESSY have never been realized, and man's toehold in space has been limited to near-earth ventures like the International Space Station (ISS) and the American Space Shuttle program that was shut down several years ago. In a word, disappointing.


    However, the 21st Century has finally begun to deliver on the promises made by people like President John F. Kennedy and Werner von Braun, thanks to a number of pioneering commercial space ventures that are rapidly beginning to deliver results. Companies like Orbital Sciences and SpaceX, are already providing resupply and retrieval services to NASA for the ISS. And sometime in 2017, SpaceX will fly their first manned mission aboard their own U.S.-built Falcon 9 rocket. These rapid and well conceived programs have not gone without incident however, as demonstrated by the recent accidents involving Orbital Sciences and Virgin Galactic's boosters and spacecraft. Nevertheless, these bold ventures, wed by men like Richard Branson and Elon Musk are pushing ahead, and look to be back sometime in 2015.


     To learn more about the coming revolution in commercial space projects, join military historian, author and journalist John D. Gresham (@greshamj01) i for Military Monday at 1 p.m. Eastern. His guest this week is Zenith Press (@Zenith_Press)

  • 00:06

    Military Monday with John D. Gresham With Zenith Press Author Gavin Mortimer

    in Military

    The United States, while a late entrant into World War I, began to contribute to the Allied war effort in 1916 and 1917 with volunteers who wanted to fight the German forces as combat aviators. These first "American Eagles," initially joined up with the French Armié de Aire's famous Lafayette Escadrille, but soon began to join the fledgling Royal Flying Corps/ Royal Air Force (RAF). By the time of America's entry into the "Great War," a sizable force of Americans were already flying, fighting, and dying over the trenches of France and the low countries. There they helped hold the line until 1918, when American flying units began to reach the front. Throughout 1918, these Americans helped hold the line against the great German "Michael" Offensive, and later that summer helped the Allies take the offensive along the entire Western front, leading to the victory of November 1918.


    To learn more about these very first American combat aviators, join military historian, author and journalist John D. Gresham (@greshamj01) for Military Monday (#MilitaryMonday on the Writestream Radio Network (@Writestream) at 1 p.m. Eastern. His guest this week will be renowned Zenith Press (@Zenith_Press) author and historian Gavin Mortimer (@gavinmortimer7). The writer of a number of military history books, Mr. Mortimer is the author of THE FIRST EAGLES, a gripping chronicle of those early volunteer American aviators who served on the Western front in 1917 and 1918. Listeners are encouraged to call in with questions and opinions for Mr. Mortimer, which should make for a lively hour of classic aviation history as America begins its run up to remembering the Great War.

  • 01:30

    Military Monday with John D. Gresham with Professor C. Christine Fair

    in Military

    Few nations in the world today remain more misunderstood and enigmatic than Pakistan. A seemingly artificial creation of the 1947 partition with India following the dissolution of the subcontinent from the British Empire, Pakistan has become one of the great international security challenges of the early 21st century. A seemingly Third World nation, Pakistan has one of the largest standing military forces in the world today and is armed with nuclear weapons. A nation with multiple ethnic/tribal groups, the Pakistani government tries to portray the nation as a purely Islamic Republic. And though it has partnered itself with numerous other nations since the partition, including the United States and the People's Republic of China, Pakistan remains a country with no real allies or even shared interests. And guiding this seemingly enigmatic nation into the 21st century is the single institution that has dominated Pakistani politics and society since the partition: the Pakistani Army.


    To learn more about the Pakistani Army and its role in Pakistani government, society, and foreign-policy, join military historian, author and journalist John D. Gresham (@greshamj01) for Military Monday (#MilitaryMonday on the Writestream Radio Network (@Writestream)) at 1 p.m. Eastern. His guest this week is Prof. C. Christine Fair (@CChristineFair) of Georgetown University, and the author of the new Oxford University Press (@OUPAcademic) book FIGHTING TO THE END. Prof. Fair is a member of the Security Studies Program of the Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service, and an expert on South Asian international affairs and military operations. Her book is a study of the Pakistani Army, its history, and influence upon Pakistan's society and political structure. This will be an intriguing hour about one of the most misunderstood nations in the world today.

  • 01:11

    Military Monday with John D. Gresham With Zenith Press Author Robert George

    in Military

    In the U.S. Military, there is no more revered or respected award for service than the Medal of Honor. Given only to service members who have exhibited the quality of going, "Above and Beyond the Call of Duty," the Medal of Honor represents the pinnacle of America's appreciation for military service in combat. Since being created 150 years ago during the American Civil War, the Medal of Honor has evolved a great deal. At one time it was awarded to whole Union regiments for mass re-enlistments. Today however, a successful Medal of Honor award is a long and complex procedure, which not only looks at the individual act of valor being considered, but also the entire previous life and military career of the candidate. This is how carefully protected and held, the Medal of Honor has become.


     To learn more about the Medal of Honor and its evolution, join military historian, author and journalist John D. Gresham for Military Monday (#MilitaryMonday on @Writrstream) at 1 p.m. Eastern. His guest this week will be author Robert George, part of the team assembled by Zenith Press (@Zenith_Press) and the Boston Publishing Company (@TheVietnamExp) to develop their new book, THE MEDAL OF HONOR.  Beautifully produced and lavishly illustrated, this book is a "must have" for any serious scholar or person interested in the Medal of Honor, its history, and the men who have earned the right to wear it. Listeners are encouraged to call in, and often both questions and opinions in what will be an hour devoted to the men who have gone, "… Above and Beyond the Call of Duty."

  • 01:04

    Military Monday with John D. Gresham

    in Military

    Join military historian, author and journalist John D. Gresham for Military Monday at 1 p.m. Eastern.

  • 01:30

    Military Monday with John D. Gresham with Zenith Press Author Michael Haskew

    in Military

    Synergy is when the confluence of people, events, and places combine to create extraordinary things and results. And in the history of the U.S. Army, there is no greater example of synergy than the West Point Class of 1915. Known as, "The Class the Stars Fell On," the class of 1915 produced 59 general officers and a President of the United States out of just 164 graduates. Graduating just as America was becoming involved in World War I, the class of 1915 showed its talents and metal early, and also suffered the first of a number of combat casualties. And while most of the class languished through much of the interwar period as field grade staff officers, the coming of World War II made them into the leaders that won the greatest conflict in history. These included general's like Dwight D. Eisenhower, Omar Bradley, James Van Fleet, and Joseph McNarney. And when World War II ended, the class of 1915 became the Army leaders that led America into the Cold War, and Korea. Never before in the history of West Point had such a group of young officers been assembled, and it has not occurred since.


    To learn more about the West Point Class of 1915, join military historian, author and journalist John D. Gresham (@greshamj01) for Military Monday (#MilitaryMonday on the Writestream Radio Network (@Writestream)) at 1 p.m. Eastern.  His guest this week is Zenith Press (@Zenith_Press) author Michael Haskew, the writer of The Class of 1915. Haskew has researched the entire West Point 1915 graduating class, including those who did not become general officers. This edition of Military Monday will be a fascinating hour looking at one of the greatest collections of  Army leadership, at both the beginning of their careers and at their apex in the crucible of World War II. Listeners are encouraged to call in and offer their questions/opinions to both gentlemen.

  • 01:28

    Military Monday with John D. Gresham and Author Cord Scott ā€“ Comics and Conflict

    in Military

    Though America cannot claim credit for the invention of cartoons and other storytelling graphics, there can be little question that the art form today has its home solidly within the borders and culture of the United States. The editorial cartoons of English newspapers and magazines were quickly adopted by the American colonies, and thanks to Benjamin Franklin and other publishers, took on a distinctly Continental flavor. And throughout the many wars fought during the 18th, 19th, and early 20th centuries, cartoons grew in both sophistication and quality. But it was the development of comic books in the decade before World War II, that created a new medium of illustrated storytelling which became a distinctly American art form. Superheroes like Superman and Captain Marvel came into being, and the idea of visual storytelling became a mainstay in American media for young people. And when America went to war in 1941, comic books and their characters went to war too. In fact, comic books, their characters, and subsidiary media products (movies, etc.) provided an excellent medium to reach out to the very demographic that had to be recruited to fight World War II


     To learn more about the role of comic books, cartoons, and other visual storytelling media in wartime, join military historian, author and journalist John D. Gresham (@greshamj01) for Military Monday (#MilitaryMonday on @Writestream) at 1 p.m. Eastern.'s guest this week is U.S. Naval Institute Press (@USNIBooks) the author Cord Scott,  who has written COMICS AND CONFLICT, a history of comics and their use as wartime propaganda tools. And together they will explain the role of illustrated storytelling in politics and propaganda through the ages. Prepare for a entertaining and informative hour, talking about the nature of media messaging and power of visual storytelling.

  • 01:30

    Military Monday with John D. Gresham and author Robert Girardi

    in Military

    Join military historian, author and journalist John D. Gresham for a replay of Military Monday with guest, Zenith Press author Robert Girardi at 1 p.m. Eastern.

  • 01:19

    Military Monday with John D. Gresham With Barrett Tillman ā€“ Forgotten Fifteenth

    in Military

    For many Americans, the word "Airpower" is defined by the exploits of the Eighth Air Force flying from England to bomb targets in Germany and occupied Europe. But there was much more to American airpower during World War II, then just the efforts of, "The Mighty Eighth." One of the more notable contributions to the Allied victory in Europe came from the U.S. Fiftheenth Air Force, based in the Mediterranean Theater of Operations. Though smaller than the Eighth, the Fifteenth Air Force was more diverse, and in some ways had a more challenging and varietal target set to prosecute. These ranged from radar stations that had to be destroyed prior to the invasion of the French Riviera in the summer of 1944, to the massive petroleum production facilities at Ploesti in Hungary. The Fifteenth Air Force was also the home to the all-Negro 332nd Fighter Group, the famous "Redtails" which had been trained as an "experiment" at Tuskegee, Alabama. And in spite of having been forgotten by most aviation historians, the men of the Fifteenth Air Force created a combat record as substantial as any other of World War II.


    To learn more about the Fifteenth Air Force, join military historian, author and journalist John D. Gresham (@greshamj01) for Military Monday at 1 p.m. Eastern. His guest this week is well known aviation historian and Regency History Press author Barrett Tillman, whose new book, FORGOTTEN FIFTEENTH, chronicles the men, missions, and story of this little-known aerial armada. Together they will take listeners through a Mediterranean odyssey, combining World War II's most advanced weapons and aircraft, with a region as old as history itself. Listeners are encouraged to call in and offer both questions and opinions, and what should be a most enlightening hour of history for aviation buffs.

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