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  • Military Monday with John D. Gresham and Zenith Press Author T.J. Mullen

    in History

    Whether you like them or not, guns are probably the most significant devices ever produced during man's industrial era here on earth. In a merger of modern metallurgy and chemistry, firearms have been among the most extreme engineering achievements in the history of the human race. But along with the technical achievements represented by guns, there have also been the consequences and social responsibilities that have gone with them. More and bloodier wars have been using firearms, than all other weapons previously developed by mankind. And today, given the greater media exposure of gun violence to the general public, the right to own and possess firearms has become a matter of international controversy. In between these two realities, is a gun culture which truly enjoys and marels at the qualities and variety of firearms across the world. And as might be imagined, many people have their individual favorite guns.


    But whatever your preferences, you're probably going to enjoy the subject of this week's Military Monday (#MilitaryMonday on the Writestream Radio Network (@Writestream)). Author, historian, journalist, documentary filmmaker, and host John D. Gresham (@greshamj01) has invited Zenith Press author T.J. Mullen to discuss his new book, 365 Guns You Must Shoot. Part of a new series that Zenith Press is rolling out this summer, 365 Guns is a compendium of some of the greatest firearms ever created, from nations all over the world. Certainly, you're in for a lively hour of guns, opinions, and favorites!

  • 01:43

    Military Monday with John D. Gresham and USNI Press Author Charles Neimeyer

    in History

    The War of 1812, was one of America's "small and forgotten" conflicts, much like the Korea in the 20th century. Ill advised, and really unnecessary for both Great Britain and the young United States of America (which was less than 50 years old at the time), the War of 1912 was a conflict that gained neither side much benefit, and diverted badly needed resources from other endeavors. Nevertheless, there were a number of intriguing and important lessons to be learned from the conflict, none more interesting than those derived from the British Chesapeake Campaign of 1814. A British squadron under command of Adm. Cochrane, raised habit for most of 1814 from the Virginia Tidewater to the waters around Baltimore, doing a surprising amount of damage and raising havoc against the seemingly hapless Americans. The British squadron took and burned Hampton, VA, portions of Washington, DC, and other towns along the bay, eventually only being stopped by the heroic defense of Baltimore and bombardment of Fort McHenry. It is a fascinating story, little known by most Americans, which almost went unnoticed during the recent bicentennial of the War of 1812.


    To learn more about the War of 1812 and the 1814 Chesapeake Campaign, tune into this week's edition of Military Monday (#MilitaryMonday on the Writestream Radio Network (@Writestream)) at 1 PM EDT. Author, historian, journalist, documentary filmmaker, and host John D. Gresham (@greshamj01) has invited Naval Institute Press (@USNIBooks) author LCOL. Charles Neimeyer. , USMC (Ret.) to discuss his new book, War in the Chesapeake. His book is a new single-volume history of the campaign, and will prove enlightening for both academics and those new to the story.

  • Military Monday with John D. Gresham

    in Military

    Join military historian, author and journalist John D. Gresham for Military Monday at 1 p.m. Eastern.

  • 01:10

    Military Monday with John D. Gresham and Zenith Press Author Robert F. Dorr

    in History

    Over the past century, mankind has been able to finally achieve one of their oldest dreams: to fly. In the 11 decades since the Wright Brothers took the first powered and manned flight, literally thousands of different airplanes have been designed and flown, for a variety of different roles and missions. And naturally, among those thousands of airplanes, favorites have emerged. Some like fighters, like the F-86 Sabre or F-15E Strike Eagle. Others prefer the "heavy iron" transport airplanes like the classic C-47 Dakota or master 747 airliner. But whatever your preference, you're probably going to enjoy the subject of this week's Military Monday (#MilitaryMonday on the Writestream Radio Network (@Writestream)). Author, historian, journalist, documentary filmmaker, and host John D. Gresham (@greshamj01) has invited Zenith Press author Bob Dorr to discuss your new book, 365 Aircraft You Must Fly Before You Die. Part of a new series that Zenith Press is rolling out this summer, 365 Aircraft is a compendium of some of the greatest aircraft ever created, from nations all over the world. Certainly, you're in for a lively hour of aircraft, opinions, and favorites!

  • 01:03

    Military Monday with John D. Gresham With USNI Press Editor Tom Cutler

    in History

    Leadership. It is a word that has less and less meaning in mainstream American society these days, and is often confused with "Management," which it is not. Leadership is the uncommon virtue and skillset which allows one person to convince and guide others towards a common goal. In no way a science, Leadership is nevertheless a craft and skill which does have elements which can be taught. This is particularly important in military organizations, where Leadership is often a life or death matter in combat. However, Leadership is also vital to the establishment and sustainment of chains of command, without which any military organization will collapse upon itself and be destroyed. And while Leadership is more of an art form than simply a set of rules to follow, defining it is often difficult. Therefore, one finds Leadership as a topic being discussed in professional military journals across the globe, in almost every written language. One such journal is the U.S. Naval Institute (USNI) Proceedings which, since 1883, has provided naval-minded individuals with a open forum to express ideas, opinions, and thoughts regarding a variety of topics, especially Leadership in the sea services.


    To learn more how Leadership is defined, join best-selling author, historian, documentary filmmaker and host John D. Gresham (@greshamj01) for Military Monday (#MilitaryMonday on the Writestream Radio Network (@Writestream)) at 1 PM EDT. His guess this week is U.S. Naval Institute Press (@USNI_Books) editor Thomas J. Cutler, who is managing the creation of USNI's new "Wheel Book" series. One of these is Naval Leadership, edited by Cutler, a collection of Proceedings essays on the subject by a variety of well-known naval leaders.


     


     


     

  • 01:59

    Military Monday With John D. Gresham and Zenith Press Author Phil Keith

    in History

    USS Lexington (CV 2), along with her sister ship, USS Saratoga (CV 3), were America's first real aircraft carriers, and genuine wonders of the world we were commissioned in the late 1920s. Converted from a pair of battlecruiser hulls made surplus by the Washington Naval Treaty, the two ships were the largest, most powerful, and fastest warships in the world. Able to carry and operate up to 90 aircraft, twice as many as any of the contemporary British and Japanese aircraft carriers, Lexington and her sister ship were the platforms where the U.S. Navy learned to take airpower out to sea. But Lexington was more than just a ship, for she also was a home and a schoolhouse for the men who served aboard her. As American's aircraft carrier fleet grew prior to World War II, Lexington and her sister were the ships where the men who would crew those new carriers learned their trades. In addition, some of the U.S. Navy's greatest leaders in World War II were captains aboard the Lexington, including Adm. Ernest J. King and Rear Adm. Forrest Sherman. And even though Lexington was lost at the Battle of the Coral Sea in May 1942, her loss taught critical damage control lessons that are still used today.


    To learn more about "Lady Lex," tune in at 1 PM EDT for Military Monday (#MilitaryMonday on the Writestream Radio Network (@Writestream)) hosted by author, historian, journalist and documentary filmmaker John D. Gresham (@greshamj01). John's guest this week is Zenith Press (@Zenith_Press) author Phil Keith, who has written a new book, STAY THE RISING SUN, chronicles the story of the Lexington to her sinking in the Coral Sea.

  • 00:51

    Military Monday with John D. Gresham With Zenith Press Editorial Dir. Erik Gilg

    in Books

    Repurposing is a word much in vogue these days, in a variety of creative arts and professions. Whether you are talking about culinary arts, architecture, interior design, or even visual arts, repurposing of existing foods, buildings, furniture and visual media is growing in popularity and practicality. Repurposing is not a new phenomenon in the publishing world, given the long history of issuing new editions of popular books, often with revised/added material and new introductions. What is new in the publishing world is repurposing an existing published work into an entirely new kind of book and/or other new media. One of the leaders in this new version of repurposing existing books has been Zenith Press (@Zenith_Press)), which has a long history of publishing quality books on military history, technology, and aerospace topics. Instead of simply putting out new editions of existing books, Zenith Press is creating lavishly illustrated and photographically rich large-format additions which are designed to stand on their own, even with owners of the existing editions.


    To learn more about book/media repurposing, join author, historian, journalist, documentary filmmaker, and radio host John D. Gresham (@greshamj01) for Military Monday (#MilitaryMonday on the Writestream Radio Network (@Writestream)) at 1 PM EDT. His guest this week is Zenith Press Editorial Director Erik Gilg, one of the principles in their ongoing program to repurpose existing books like Co. Aytch by Sam Watkins, and Hallowed Ground by James McPherson. So tune in for what will be a lively hour about taking what is old, and making it new again for a new audience. Listeners are encouraged to call in and offer their opinions and questions to both gentlemen, about one of the most interesting phenomenons in the publishing world.

  • 01:14

    Military Monday Replay with John D. Gresham & USNI Author Capt. Alfred McLaren

    in History

    It is ofter forgotten that just 60 years ago, man knew more about the surface of the moon than about was under the artic icecap. Then, with the coming of nuclear powered submarines in the late 1950's, the U.S. Navy began to explore and operate under the polar ice pack, and the Cold War took a new and deadly turn. Following his graduation from the United States Naval Academy in Annapolis, Maryland in 1955, Alfred McLaren took a career path that would make him one of the greatest Arctic explorers of all time. Following a tour aboard USS Greenfish (SS 351), Maclaren moved over to his first nuclear powered submarine, USS Seadragon (SSN 584), and began a career of Arctic exploration that has made him a household name in the field. This culminated in the late 1960s when he was part of the commissioning crew of USS Queenfish (SSN 651), which he later commanded on a landmark under ice survey of the Siberian Continental Shelf. His Arctic explorations, along with many other Cold War missions and patrols, made Capt. McLaren something of a living legend within the " Silent Service," which he remains today.


    To learn more about Capt. McLaren, the submarines that he served on, and his explorations/missions during his years of service on American submarines, join best-selling author, historian, journalist, documentary filmmaker, and radio host John D. Gresham (Greshamj01) for Military Monday (#MilitaryMonday on the Writestream Radio Network (@Writestream)) at 1 PM EDT. This week John will be interviewing U.S. Naval Institute Press (@USNIBooks) author and submariner Capt. Alfred McLaren about his submarine career, and his new book, SILENT AND UNSEEN, a memoir of his naval career. So please tun in to hear the interview of a memorable explorer and Cold Warrior.

  • 01:31

    Military Monday With John D. Gresham Replay – DINFOS Trained Killers

    in History

    The Military Monday (#MilitaryMonday on the Writestream Radio Network (@Writestream)) team is off this week, as we prepare some new and exciting shows for you in the weeks and months ahead. So we will be running a replay of last week's outstanding "DINFOS Trained Killers" show with Lt. Col. John Clearwater, USA (Ret.) today at 1 PM EST. And please join us next Monday at 1 PM for another brand-new edition of Military Monday.


     


    Thanks All!

  • 01:05

    Military Monday with John D. Gresham With USNI Press Author Benjamin Armstrong

    in History

    In 2013, Benjamin F. "BJ" Armstrong, a career naval officer and aviator, wrote/edited the book 21ST CENTURY MAHAN, published by the U.S. Naval Institute Press (USNI Press – @USNIBooks). Widely reviewed and extremely well received, the book was based upon the premise that the ideas presented in the writings of American seapower theorist Alfred Thayer Mahan were still relevant in the 21st century, more than a century after the publication of his seminal work, THE INFLUANCE OF SEAPOWER UPON HISTORY. Armstrongs book revived a lively discussion about the relevance and merits of seapower in the present day, and the idea that the tenets Mahan put forth in the late 1800s, were still relevant in a world being defined by new technologies and emerging world powers.


    Now, in 2015, Armstrong has published a new book in what has become USNI Press's emerging "21st Century" series of books with 21ST CENTURY SIMS, based upon the career and writings of Adm. William Sims. A true among the naval leaders of the early 20th century, Sims is less well known for his vast published works on naval leadership, particularly as they apply to junior officers. Now Mr. Armstrong has collected and edited them, in a compact work that provides new insights into this fascinating military personality from a century ago.


    This week, Benjamin Armstrong joins author, historian, journalist, and documentary filmmaker John D. Gresham (@greshamj01) on Military Monday (#MilitaryMonday on the Writestream Radio Network (@Writestream)) to talk about his new book, along with his editorship of the new "21st Century" book series for USNI Press. This should be a lively hour of history, books, and publishing, and listeners are invited to call in and discuss their ideas and questions with both gentlemen.

  • Military Monday Replay with John D. Gresham and Dr. Tania Howard

    in Military

    We at Military Monday are on hiatus this week for the New Year holiday, and will be back next week with a new show. In the meantime, please login and enjoy a replay of one of our most popular shows of 2014, with Dr. Tania Howard. Dr. Tania is a licensed chiropractor practicing in Annapolis, Maryland, and has extensive experience working with military personnel and families, especially those returning from overseas duty and its side effects. So, join us for this replay of Military Monday with Dr. Tania Howard today at 1 p.m. Eastern.