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  • 00:22

    The Blue Planet Project

    in Motivation

            


    The following document is believed to be the personal notes and scientific dairy of a scientist who was contracted by the government over several years to visit all crash sites, interrogate captured Alien Life Forms and analyze all data gathered from that endeavor. He also wrote notes on or about any documents which he came in contact with, which in any way related directly or indirectly to the organization, structure or operation for the collection of such data.



    This individual was discovered to have kept and maintained such personal notes and therefore was scheduled for termination. He narrowly escaped termination by the government and is currently in hiding out of this country.



    We believe his involvement in these investigations span over a thirty-three (33) year period. He was soon discovered and immediately went into hiding in 1990.
    We modified his personal notes only so slightly, and only when necessary to make them flow together and read correctly.



    When you read this document, it may disturb you. The real facts have a tendency to do exactly that, but this information needs to get to the general public. I caution you to use your best judgment when allowing a minor child to read this document.



    At this time, to the best of the data we have available, there are at least one hundred and sixty (160) species or races of Aliens from different galaxies, stars and planets we have encountered. You will find as much data (as we have available thru 1990) on each race in the following pages, as each race is discussed. There are still more Aliens we haven't encountered yet but we feel it won't be long before we do...


     

  • 00:26

    Ebola virus: What you need to know about the deadly outbreak

    in Motivation

    The International Committee on Taxonomy of Viruses currently recognizes four species of Ebola: Zaire ebolavirus (EBOV), Sudan ebolavirus (SUDV), Reston ebolavirus (RESTV), and Taï Forest ebolavirus (TAFV).One additional species or type of Ebola is often recognized by the World Health Organization (WHO) and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) as Bundibugyo ebolavirus (BDBV) or Ebola-Bundibugyo, following the outbreak in Uganda in 2007


    Ebola outbreaks have been restricted to Africa with the exception of Reston ebolavirus. However, on 30 September 2014 a patient in Dallas, Texas who had recently travelled to Liberia in west Africa may have been infected with the same strain involved in the 2014 outbreak in that country.


    Transmission between natural reservoirs and humans is rare, and outbreaks are often traceable to a single case where an individual has handled the carcass of a gorilla, chimpanzee, or duiker. The virus then spreads person-to-person, especially within families, hospitals, and during some mortuary rituals where contact among individuals becomes more likely. Before outbreaks are confirmed in areas of weak surveillance on the local or regional levels, Ebola is often mistaken for malaria, typhoid fever, dysentery, influenza, or various bacterial infections which may be endemic to the region. Learning from failed responses, such as that to the 2000 Uganda outbreak, public health measures including the WHO's Global Outbreak and Response Network were instituted in areas at high risk. Field laboratories were established in order to confirm cases, instead of shipping samples to South Africa.

  • 00:47

    WHAT IS G.A.T.T ?

    in Spirituality

    The General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT) was a multilateral agreement regulating international trade. According to its preamble, its purpose was the "substantial reduction of tariffs and other trade barriers and the elimination of preferences, on a reciprocal and mutually advantageous basis." It was negotiated during the United NationsConference on Trade and Employment and was the outcome of the failure of negotiating governments to create theInternational Trade Organization (ITO). GATT was signed in 1947 and lasted until 1994, when it was replaced by the World Trade Organization in 1995

  • 01:00

    THE PRISON INDUSTRIAL COMPLEX

    in Politics

    The term "prison-industrial complex" (PIC) is used to attribute the rapid expansion of the US inmate population to the political influence of private prison companies and businesses that supply goods and services to government prison agencies. The term is derived from the "military-industrial complex" of the 1950s. Such groups include corporations that contract prison labor, construction companies, surveillance technology vendors, lawyers, and lobby groups that represent them. Activists[who?] have argued that the prison-industrial complex is perpetuating a flawed belief that imprisonment is an effective solution to social problems such as homelessness, unemployment, drug addiction, mental illness, and illiteracy.
    The term 'prison industrial complex' has been used to describe a similar issue in other countries' prisons of expanding populations.
    The promotion of prison-building as a job creator and the use of inmate labor are also cited as elements of the prison-industrial complex. The term often implies a network of actors who are motivated by making profit rather than solely by punishing or rehabilitating criminals or reducing crime rates. Proponents of this view, including civil rights organizations such as The Rutherford Institute and the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU), believe that the desire for monetary gain has led to the growth of the prison industry and the number of incarcerated individuals.

  • 00:49

    CHINA AND THE US ECONOMY

    in Spirituality

    An unlikely participant increasingly is showing up in the bidding for distressed office buildings, hotels and other overleveraged commercial properties left over from the boom years: Chinese investors.

  • 00:47

    FREEDOM FRIDAY- TOWN HALL MEETING - NELSON MANDELA

    in Current Events

    Nelson Rolihlahla Mandela (Xhosa pronunciation: [xo'li??a?a man'de?la]; 18 July 1918 – 5 December 2013) was a South African anti-apartheid revolutionary, politician and philanthropist who served as President of South Africa from 1994 to 1999. He was the first black South African to hold the office, and the first elected in a fully representative election. His government focused on dismantling the legacy of apartheid through tackling institutionalised racism, poverty and inequality, and fostering racial reconciliation. Politically an African nationalist and democratic socialist, he served as President of the African National Congress (ANC) from 1991 to 1997. Internationally, Mandela was Secretary General of the Non-Aligned Movement from 1998 to 1999.

  • 01:03

    United States Constitution - LIBERTY CALLS

    in Politics

    The Constitution of the United States is the supreme law of the United States of America. The Constitution originally consisted of seven Articles. The first three Articles embody the doctrine of the separation of powers, whereby the federal government is divided into three branches: the legislature, consisting of the bicameral Congress; the executive, consisting of the President; and the judiciary, consisting of the Supreme Court and other federal courts. The fourth and sixth Articles frame the doctrine of federalism, describing the relationship between State and State, and between the several States and the federal government. The fifth Article provides the procedure for amending the Constitution. The seventh Article provides the procedure for ratifying the Constitution.
    The Constitution was adopted on September 17, 1787, by the Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and ratified by conventions in eleven States. It went into effect on March 4, 1789.
    Since the Constitution was adopted, it has been amended twenty-seven times. The first ten amendments (along with two others that were not ratified at the time) were proposed by Congress on September 25, 1789, and were ratified by the necessary three-fourths of the States on December 15, 1791.These first ten amendments are known as the Bill of Rights.
    The Constitution is interpreted, supplemented, and implemented by a large body of constitutional law. The Constitution of the United States was the first constitution of its kind, and has influenced the constitutions of many other nations.

  • 00:31

    FREEDOM FRIDAYS - TOWN HALL MEETING

    in Politics

    The Constitution of the United States is the supreme law of the United States of America. The Constitution originally consisted of seven Articles. The first three Articles embody the doctrine of the separation of powers, whereby the federal government is divided into three branches: the legislature, consisting of the bicameral Congress; the executive, consisting of the President; and the judiciary, consisting of the Supreme Court and other federal courts. The fourth and sixth Articles frame the doctrine of federalism, describing the relationship between State and State, and between the several States and the federal government. The fifth Article provides the procedure for amending the Constitution. The seventh Article provides the procedure for ratifying the Constitution.
    The Constitution was adopted on September 17, 1787, by the Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and ratified by conventions in eleven States. It went into effect on March 4, 1789.
    Since the Constitution was adopted, it has been amended twenty-seven times. The first ten amendments (along with two others that were not ratified at the time) were proposed by Congress on September 25, 1789, and were ratified by the necessary three-fourths of the States on December 15, 1791.These first ten amendments are known as the Bill of Rights.
    The Constitution is interpreted, supplemented, and implemented by a large body of constitutional law. The Constitution of the United States was the first constitution of its kind, and has influenced the constitutions of many other nations.