• 01:30

    Black Reconstruction #LaShawnAllenMuhammad 323.927.2913

    in Finance

    Hosted By: LaShawn Allen-Muhammad


    Who were the first Black Elected Officials? During the month of November, as the country gears up to re-elect or vote in the next wave of politicians, Black Reconstruction will revisit the Reconstruction era to pay homage to the Black Men who came before Obama.  During this tumultuous time, Blacks not only established townships, they also positioned themselves to be an integral part of government.   


    At a Glance.. In 1855, Brownhelm Township, founded by Col. Henry Brown,  gained notoriety throughout the U.S, when the township elected an African-American to government office.  The NY Syracuse Daily Journal, May 31, 1855 reported that John Mercer Langston was a fugitive slave who had been elected clerk.  Brownhelm's early residents had long been known for their strong anti-slavery stance; and Col. Henry Brown's home on the Lake Shore was often a final stop on the Underground Railroad, before reaching Canada by boat.    African-American Firsts: Government


    Local elected official: John Mercer Langston, 1855, town clerk of Brownhelm Township, Ohio.


    State elected official: Alexander Lucius Twilight, 1836, the Vermont legislature.


    Governor (appointed): P.B.S. Pinchback served as governor of Louisiana from Dec. 9, 1872-Jan. 13, 1873, during impeachment proceedings against the elected governor.


    U.S. Representative: Joseph Rainey became a Congressman from South Carolina in 1870 and was reelected four more times. 


    U.S. Senator: Hiram Revels became Senator from Mississippi from Feb. 25, 1870, to March 4, 1871, during Reconstruction.  


    There have only been a total of five black senators in U.S. history: the remaining two are Blanche K. Bruce [1875-1881] and Barack Obama 


     

  • 02:59

    320 BOOCHFEST

    in Wrestling

    Today on The Boochcast, Booch talks about Derek's upcoming movie, why Desmond is not on the show today, WWE Surpasses NBA As Top Sports Channel On Youtube, Sean Waltman Rants About Chyna/Triple H Domestic Abuse Allegations, Post-Wrestlemania WWE Europe Tour Lineup, He Gave A Homeless Guy $100 And Secretly Followed Him To A Liquor Store — But There’s A Major Twist That Left Him In Awe, J.K. Rowling's New Story Reveals The Sad Truth About Draco Malfoy, recaps WWE Smackdown, Stephanie McMahon Furious At AJ Lee, and Update On Vince Russo Relationship With Lucha Underground. 


     


     


     


     

  • 01:30

    Black Reconstruction #LaShawnAllenMuhammad 323.927.2913

    in Politics

    Hosted By: LaShawn Allen-Muhammad


    Who were the first Black Elected Officials? During the month of November, as the country gears up to re-elect or vote in the next wave of politicians, Black Reconstruction will revisit the Reconstruction era to pay homage to the Black Men who came before Obama.  During this tumultuous time, Blacks not only established townships, they also positioned themselves to be an integral part of government.   


    At a Glance.. In 1855, Brownhelm Township, founded by Col. Henry Brown,  gained notoriety throughout the U.S, when the township elected an African-American to government office.  The NY Syracuse Daily Journal, May 31, 1855 reported that John Mercer Langston was a fugitive slave who had been elected clerk.  Brownhelm's early residents had long been known for their strong anti-slavery stance; and Col. Henry Brown's home on the Lake Shore was often a final stop on the Underground Railroad, before reaching Canada by boat.    African-American Firsts: Government


    Local elected official: John Mercer Langston, 1855, town clerk of Brownhelm Township, Ohio.


    State elected official: Alexander Lucius Twilight, 1836, the Vermont legislature.


    Governor (appointed): P.B.S. Pinchback served as governor of Louisiana from Dec. 9, 1872-Jan. 13, 1873, during impeachment proceedings against the elected governor.


    U.S. Representative: Joseph Rainey became a Congressman from South Carolina in 1870 and was reelected four more times. 


    U.S. Senator: Hiram Revels became Senator from Mississippi from Feb. 25, 1870, to March 4, 1871, during Reconstruction.  


    There have only been a total of five black senators in U.S. history: the remaining two are Blanche K. Bruce [1875-1881] and Barack Obama 


     


     

  • 00:45

    How You Know You Are Married To Lucius Lyon

    in Comedy

    Brian, Mike, & Kelley talk about current events with a comedic twist.

  • 01:07

    Black Reconstruction #LaShawnAllenMuhammad 323.927.2913

    in Politics

    Hosted By: LaShawn Allen-Muhammad


    Who were the first Black Elected Officials? During the month of November, as the country gears up to re-elect or vote in the next wave of politicians, Black Reconstruction will revisit the Reconstruction era to pay homage to the Black Men who came before Obama.  During this tumultuous time, Blacks not only established townships, they also positioned themselves to be an integral part of government.   


    At a Glance.. In 1855, Brownhelm Township, founded by Col. Henry Brown,  gained notoriety throughout the U.S, when the township elected an African-American to government office.  The NY Syracuse Daily Journal, May 31, 1855 reported that John Mercer Langston was a fugitive slave who had been elected clerk.  Brownhelm's early residents had long been known for their strong anti-slavery stance; and Col. Henry Brown's home on the Lake Shore was often a final stop on the Underground Railroad, before reaching Canada by boat.    African-American Firsts: Government


    Local elected official: John Mercer Langston, 1855, town clerk of Brownhelm Township, Ohio.


    State elected official: Alexander Lucius Twilight, 1836, the Vermont legislature.


    Governor (appointed): P.B.S. Pinchback served as governor of Louisiana from Dec. 9, 1872-Jan. 13, 1873, during impeachment proceedings against the elected governor.


    U.S. Representative: Joseph Rainey became a Congressman from South Carolina in 1870 and was reelected four more times. 


     


     

  • 01:18

    Black Reconstruction #LaShawnAllenMuhammad 323.927.2913

    in Business

    Hosted By: LaShawn Allen-Muhammad


    Who were the first Black Elected Officials? During the month of November, as the country gears up to re-elect or vote in the next wave of politicians, Black Reconstruction will revisit the Reconstruction era to pay homage to the Black Men who came before Obama.  During this tumultuous time, Blacks not only established townships, they also positioned themselves to be an integral part of government.   


    At a Glance.. In 1855, Brownhelm Township, founded by Col. Henry Brown,  gained notoriety throughout the U.S, when the township elected an African-American to government office.  The NY Syracuse Daily Journal, May 31, 1855 reported that John Mercer Langston was a fugitive slave who had been elected clerk.  Brownhelm's early residents had long been known for their strong anti-slavery stance; and Col. Henry Brown's home on the Lake Shore was often a final stop on the Underground Railroad, before reaching Canada by boat.   


    African-American Firsts: Government


    Local elected official: John Mercer Langston, 1855, town clerk of Brownhelm Township, Ohio.


    State elected official: Alexander Lucius Twilight, 1836, the Vermont legislature.


    Governor (appointed): P.B.S. Pinchback served as governor of Louisiana from Dec. 9, 1872-Jan. 13, 1873, during impeachment proceedings against the elected governor.


    U.S. Representative: Joseph Rainey became a Congressman from South Carolina in 1870 and was reelected four more times. 


    U.S. Senator: Hiram Revels became Senator from Mississippi from Feb. 25, 1870, to March 4, 1871, during Reconstruction.  


     

  • 00:30

    Councilwoman Shameka Reynolds, Rev.Lionel Gantt,Terry Thomas -Stopping Violence

    in Self Help

    Join as we talk about the upcoming rally in response to death of 19 yr old Marcaysia Dawkins She was robbed and killed while waiting at a bus stop. Also update on plans to help stop violence in DeKalb County, GA and around the US. Also hear about a proposed State of GA Bill that would require Black History to be part of standard High School curriculum.


    Invited guests Lithonia City Councilwoman Shameka Reynolds, SCLC Stop Youth Violence and Incarceration Director Rev. Lionel Gantt, and Education Consultant Terry Thomas 

  • 00:30

    Atlanta Area Councilwoman, Pastor and Educator speak about stopping violence

    in Self Help

    Join as we talk about the upcoming rally in response to death of 19 yr old Marcaysia Dawkins She was robbed and killed while waiting at a bus stop. Also update on plans to help stop violence in DeKalb County, GA and around the US.


    Invited guests Lithonia City Councilwoman Shameka Reynolds, SCLC Stop Youth Violence and Incarceration Director Rev. Lionel Gantt, and Terry Thomas proponent of GA Bill that would require Black History to be part of standard High School curriculum.Hear anywhere

  • 00:31

    Why You Can't Pour Love Into A Broken Glass

    in Relationships

    In this segment of the Dani Lovestrong show author Kevin L.Gantt and I will define the various types of broken glasses and discuss how to identify people who are broken and unable to establish and cultivate healthy intimate relationships and discuss what to do when you encounter people who are broken in a way that they are unable to fully recieve your love.  

  • 01:01

    Music with a Message with Champale Parks

    in Spirituality

    Music with a Message is bring the sounds of two lovely artist Calandra Gant & Angela Stanley. Although their walk of faith are from different paths, the both have sound to the same tune of Praising God!


    So please join Champale Parks as she once again bring nothing but Music with a Message.

  • 00:43

    Live Broadcast From Pleasant Rock

    in Religion

    Hear the Living Word as preached by Pastor Rev. Chris L. Gantt

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