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  • 01:01

    TELLING THE STORY

    in Current Events

    SHARING THE STORY


            Why is it so important for trauma and domestic violence victims to tell their stories? Are they just sharing cautionary tales, or does the telling make a difference?


            It turns out that telling a trauma narrative does help with recovery for victims. Research also shows that sharing the story can also help minimize psychological effects that can follow.  At least one organization recognizes this and has helped survivors with the telling in at least one special project.


            Brian Pinero is the chief programs officer at the National Domestic Violence Hotline and its youth-focused program, loveisrespect.  He’s going to talk with us about a project designed to facilitate survivors’ stories and the results of that project. Prior to joining The Hotline, he supervised youth shelter services, was an investigator at Child Protective Services and worked as a juvenile probation officer. Brian is a member of the National Advisory Board for Crisis Text Line and holds a master’s degree in social work from the University of Texas.


            Join us Saturday as we explore the importance of telling the story and how we can do that effectively. Call-in to share how your story or that of others has helped you deal with life experiences.  (646) 378-0430.


    Live at 11 am Pacific time, or go to the website and listen to all our archived programs whenever you like at http://www.blogtalkradio.com/3women3ways

  • 00:31

    The National Domestic Violence Hotline

    in Women

    Operating around the clock, seven days a week, confidential and free of cost, the National Domestic Violence Hotline provides lifesaving tools and immediate support to enable victims to find safety and live lives free of abuse. Callers to the hotline at 1-800-799-SAFE (7233) can expect highly trained experienced advocates to offer compassionate support, crisis intervention information and referral services in over 170 languages and much, much more.


    In today's episode of GUC, I am delighted to welcome the president of the National Domestic Violence Hotline and the National Dating Abuse Hotline, Katie Ray-Jones.

  • 00:33

    Chatting with Latin@ Youth

    in Women

    Join us in a 30 minute conversation with Latin@ Peer Youth Educators from Casa de Esperanza and Raúl Sánchez, a member of the executive committee and youth advisory board from loveisrespect as we talk about healthy relationships. These young leaders will also discuss what you can do in your communities to prevent and respond to teen dating violence. Don’t miss it!...But if you cannot join us live, you’ll have the chance to listen to the recording. 

  • 00:28

    Teen Dating Violence Awareness Month with Joy Keys

    in Current Events

    Jasmine Ceja graduated from California State University, Los Angeles in 2010 with a Bachelors degree in Child Development and a Certificate in Youth Agency Administration. A strong advocate for healthy relationships and the well-being of children and adolescents, Jasmine engages diverse youth populations in public and private schools, juvenile justice and teen parenting programs and afterschool groups. In addition, she provides direct training to school districts and educators to improve their response to incidents of abuse. Jasmine joined Break the Cycle in 2010 as Youth Programs Coordinator and also serves as the Supervisor of the Loveisrespect National Youth Advisory Board. Break the Cycle is a leading national voice for the prevention of dating violence among teens and young adults. With partners ranging from MTV to the White House, Break the Cycle creates innovative programming to educate and engage youth to take a direct role in ending violence while simultaneously building the tools and resources for adults to lead youth on that journey. http://www.breakthecycle.org/


    LaNesha Baldwin is a Girl/Friends Coordinator as well as A Long Walk Home youth board member. Founded in 2003, A Long Walk Home, Inc. (ALWH) is a 501 (c) non-profit that uses art therapy and the visual and performing arts to end violence against girls and women. ALWH features the testimonies and art by survivors and their allies in order to provide safe and entertaining forums through which the public can learn about healing from and preventing gender violence. http://www.alongwalkhome.org/