• 01:51

    Introducing ICERM Radio: A Global Peace Network

    in Education

    An objective evaluation of the history of the world and current events reveal the frequent, incessant and violent nature of ethnic and religious conflicts in countries around the globe. In the words of Donald Horowitz, “ethnic violence since World War II has claimed more than ten million lives, and in the last two decades ethnic conflict has become especially widespread. Ethnicity is at the center of politics in country after country, a potent source of challenges to the cohesion of states and of international tension”.
    Recent violence around the world demonstrates that religious conflicts are growing more intense.
    Confronted by these facts, many people have been engaged for a long time in the quest to understand the role of ethnicity and religion in human conflict. Important questions have emerged that seek to recognize and explore these roles in hopes of better understanding the causal relationship between ethnic or religious differences and violent conflict.
    Committed to the mission of developing alternative methods of preventing, resolving, and educating people about inter-ethnic and inter-religious conflicts in countries around the world, the International Center for Ethno-Religious Mediation (ICERM) has adopted a unique, comprehensive and coordinated approach to address ethnic and religious conflicts through its online radio project, ICERM Radio.
    This episode is therefore aimed at introducing ICERM Radio to the world. As a global peace network dedicated to promoting inter-ethnic and inter-religious cooperation, ICERM Radio shall feature programs that inform, educate, engage, mediate, and heal. Broadcasting from New York City, the cultural melting pot of the world; join us to listen to news, lectures, dialogue, documentary interviews, book reviews, and music.

  • 01:25

    Conflict Resolution in Africa - Role of the United Nations

    in Education

    ICERM Radio invites you to tune in for its Lecture Program on Conflict Resolution and Peacebuilding in Africa - The Role of the United Nations;
    Featuring Ambassador Shola Jonathan Omoregie, Former Representative of the United Nations Secretary-General for Guinea-Bissau and Head of the United Nations Peacebuilding Support Office in Guinea-Bissau (UNOGBIS). 
    Date: Wednesday, November 6, 2013 at 2 pm in ET New York. 
    Ambassador Shola Omoregie is founder and Chief Operating Officer of the Africa Peace Support, LLC, an international consulting firm with a focus on political and security consultancy.  A former career diplomat at the United Nations, Ambassador Omoregie is an expert on the United Nations Security Council and peace operations having had a dedicated and distinguished service at the United Nations spanning over three decades. From January to March 2010, he led an International Team of Consultants to review ten African Union Political Liaison Offices/Missions in Africa. He currently moderates seminars organized by United Nations Institute for Training and Research (UNITAR) in Multilateral Diplomacy, which strengthens Member States capacities and helps them to perform effectively in the United Nations.
    From October 2006 - December 2008, he served as the Representative of the United Nations Secretary-General in Guinea-Bissau and Head of United Nations Peace-building Support office in Guinea-Bissau (UNOGBIS). Prior to this, he was Chief of Branch of the United Nations Security Council Practices and Charter Research Branch in the Security Council Affairs Division of the Department of Political Affairs, and had also served in the Sanctions and Secretariat Branches of the Security Council Affairs Division.

  • 01:47

    Ethnic and Religious Conflicts in South Sudan, the CAR, the DRC and Nigeria

    in Education

    You are invited to the ICERM Radio Panel Discussion Broadcast.


    Theme: Ethno-Religious Conflicts in South Sudan, the CAR, the DRC and Nigeria: Encouraging Aspects within the Chaos


    Date: Thursday, January 16 2014 at 7:30 pm in EST, New York.


    Every community, whether village or nation, is an expression of the consciousness of that community in that place and time. This consciousness affects the communities’ identity, perspectives, and so their interaction with each other and the outside world.


    This week, we are honored to have an exceptional panel of experts whose knowledge and expertise can help bring a deeper understanding of the individual and collective consciousness at work breeding & feeding conflict in South Sudan, the Democratic Republic of Congo, the Central African Republic, and Nigeria.


    Within the chaos, even in the direst situations, there are adaptive strategies at play. There is an emergent thinking that is working; there are individuals and budding paradigms that hold promise.


    In the next hour, we hope to gain new insights into that which offers us hope & inspires optimism for Africa.


    Overarching questions: Where do these healthy strategies emerge from? What can we do to foster these ideas? Support these individuals? Nurture these adaptive paradigms?


    Experts / Panelists


    Dr. Mwangi S. Kimenyi


    Modem Lawson-Betum


    Prof. John Mukum Mbaku


    Ambassador Shola J. Omoregie


    Agiri Chris JN Esq


    Prof. René Lemarchand


    To listen to the show, please stay on this page. To ask questions dial +1-(347) 989-8294.

  • 01:20

    Cultivating a Consciousness of Mindful Living

    in Education

    Join us for this episode of ICERM Radio as we discuss “Mindful Giving: Giving out of love, not out of duty” with Dr. Ani Kalayjian. 


    Stay on this page to listen to the show live.


    Date: Monday, December 30, 2013 at 8 pm in ET, New York. 


    “If instead of a gem, or even a flower, we should cast the gift of a loving thought into the heart of a friend,  that would be giving as the angels give.” - George Macdonald.


    Dr. Ani Kalayjian is a psychology professor, American Board Certified Expert in Traumatic Stress, logotherapeutic psychotherapist, traumatologist, Genocide Scholar, conflict resolution expert, researcher, community organizer, and international consultant. She is the recipient of the Honorary Doctor of Science Degree from her Alma Mate, Long Island University in NYC. She has over twenty years of experience in disaster management, mass-trauma interventions & conflict resolution; twenty years of university teaching experience (both grad. & undergrad levels) and she has been psychotherapist in practice in both NY/NJ for 25 yrs. She was awarded: the Outstanding Alumni of the year Award from Teachers College, Columbia University (2007); the Honorary Human Rights Award by ANA (2010), as well as elected a Fellow of the New York Academy of Medicine (2010). Currently she is teaching a special graduate course on Forgiveness: Clinical, self, familial, social and peace perspectives at Teachers College, Columbia University.


    Do you have questions, something or a story to share with us, please dial: +1-(347) 989-8294 to talk with the Host and Guest. 

  • 01:11

    The Hour of Sunlight: One Palestinian's Journey from Prisoner to Peacemaker

    in Education

    ICERM Book Review Program.


    We are thrilled to announce the review of “The Hour of Sunlight: One Palestinian's Journey from Prisoner to Peacemaker “, an award winning book written by Sami Al Jundi and Jen Marlowe.


    Date:  Sunday, March 9, 2014 at 8:00 pm in EST, New York.


    Host: Maurice Q. Robinson, Esq., PHR


    Guest and Author: Jen Marlowe


    The Hour of Sunlight describes Sami Al Jundi’s extraordinary metamorphosis from a militant to a passionate advocate of nonviolence and peaceful reconciliation. Born to a family of Palestinian refugees in the Old City of Jerusalem, Sami was only five years old when Israeli soldiers took over his home after the 1967 war. His family began life again as refugees in another part of the Old City. In moving detail Sami describes how these and other realities (and indignities) of his early years caused his radicalization.


    Following his arrest, Sami was bound and tortured for weeks by the Israeli General Security Service before beginning his ten-year prison sentence. Ironically, it was in an Israeli jail that his personal transformation began: Sami was welcomed into a highly organized, democratic community of political prisoners who required that members of their cell read, engage in political discourse on topics ranging from global revolutions to Russian literature.


    In the prison library, Sami found a book on Mahatma Gandhi. He was struck by one story in particular—a Hindu man who had murdered a Muslim baby came to Gandhi seeking repentance. Gandhi told him that there was one way that he could find peace again; he must raise a Muslim orphan for twenty years. It took two decades to build a life, Sami reflected, but only seconds to destroy one.


    To listen to the show, please stay on this page. To share your views or ask questions dial +1-(347) 989-8294. 

  • 01:46

    Dominican Republic - Haiti Relations

    in Education

    Join us for another episode of ICERM Radio Panel Discussion Broadcast.


    Theme: Dominican Republic - Haiti Relations


    Date: Wednesday, February 26, 2014 at 8:00 pm in Eastern Time, New York. 


    Featuring two outstanding experts:


    Professor Silvio Torres-Saillant, founder of the CUNY Dominican Studies Institute, Professor in the English Department, formerly headed the Latino-Latin American Studies Program in the College of Arts and Sciences, Syracuse University and co-founder, La Casita Cultural Center, an organization opened in the Near West Side of the City of Syracuse with the mission to create bridges of communication, collaboration, and exchange linking Syracuse University with the Latino population of the city and promoting the Hispanic heritages of Central New York.


    Jocelyn McCalla, human rights activist and expert, founder of the Haitian Studies Association, former Executive Director of the National Coalition for Haitian Rights, and of the New Jersey Immigration Policy Network, and former Board member of the National Immigration Forum, the NY Immigration Coalition, as well as former Advisory Board member of Human Rights Watch/Americas.


    The Panelists will be discussing the emerging conflicts between the two neighboring countries in the island and practical ways to prevent and manage similar conflicts in the future. Central to this Panel discussion broadcast is the DR’s Constitutional Court ruling on the question of “Citizenship rights to Dominicans born primarily of Haitian immigrant parents in the Dominican Republic”.


    Stay tuned for an exciting and inspiring broadcast. To listen to the show, please stay on this page. To share your views or ask questions dial +1-(347) 989-8294. You can also join the chat room discussion to share your views: http://www.blogtalkradio.com/flashchat/chat.aspx?HostUserURL=icermradio


     

  • 01:51

    Misunderstood Myanmar - A Review of Dr Koh Kim Seng's Book

    in Books

    You are invited to the ICERM Radio Book Review Program.  


    Date: Thursday, February 13, 2014 at 8:00 pm in EST, New York. 


    Host: Chavie Brumer.


    Guest and Author: Dr Koh Kim Seng.


    We are happy to announce the review of "Misunderstood Myanmar – An Introspective Study Of A Southeast Asian State In Transition".


    Join us to listen to the untold stories about Myanmar as Dr. Koh Seng talks about his extensive field work in Myanmar, and reports on his close encounters with the military Junta, and with business and bureaucratic elites.


    “This book argues that to understand the vicissitudes of Myanmar’s recent history and the behavior of its generals one has to grasp the dynamic interaction (struggle even) between, on one hand, its external environment (milieu exterieur), including the disgruntled diaspora alongside the U.S. led international community, and on the other, the internal environment (milieu interieur) consisting of the generals’ ideological orientation in politics and economics which , the author argues, exceptionally , still draws from a well of adverse colonial experiences and betrayals, as well as from religion and culture. ‘Exceptionally’ because unlike other developing states Myanmar has been isolated from the international world for so long that those same internal factors have crystallized and come to take on a significance which, arguably,  exceeds the role played by history, culture and religion in other parts of the world."


    To listen to the show, please stay on this page. To ask questions, dial +1-(347) 989-8294 or join the chat discussion. 

  • 01:51

    Human Dignity, Humiliation and Violent Conflict

    in Education

    Join us for another edition of ICERM Radio. Stay on this page to listen.


    In this episode, Dr. Evelin Lindner and Dr. Linda Hartling will draw our attention to their work on Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies (HumanDHS), a global transdisciplinary fellowship of concerned academics, practitioners, activists, artists, and others, who collaborate in a spirit of mutual support to understand the complex dynamics of dignity and humiliation. Their goal is to stimulate systemic change - globally and locally - to open space for mutual respect and esteem to take root and grow, thus ending humiliating practices and breaking cycles of humiliation while advancing dignity throughout the world.


    Date: Wednesday, December 4, 2013 at 11 am in ET New York.


    Evelin Lindner is the founding president of Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies (HumanDHS). Dr. Lindner has a dual education as a Medical Doctor and a Psychologist, with two Ph.D.s. (Dr. med. and Dr. psychol.). She lives and teaches globally. Among others, she is also a research fellow at the University of Oslo since 1997, affiliated with Columbia University in New York City since 2001 (with the Advanced Consortium on Cooperation, Conflict, and Complexity, AC4), and with the Maison des Sciences de l'Homme in Paris since 2003. 


    Linda M. Hartling, Ph.D., is the Director of Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies (HumanDHS). Dr. Hartling is the past Associate Director of the Jean Baker Miller Training Institute (JBMTI), part of the Wellesley Centers for Women (WCW) at Wellesley College in Massachusetts, the largest women’s research center in the United States.  Dr. Hartling holds a doctoral degree in clinical/community psychology and has published papers on Relational-Cultural Theory, workplace practices, resilience, substance abuse prevention, and the psychological and social impact of humiliation. 


     

  • 01:56

    Witness to Transformation: My years at the United Nations

    in Education

    ICERM Book Review Program. We are happy to announce the review of "Witness to Transformation: My years at the United Nations", a candid and illuminating memoir written by Ambassador Shola Omoregie, Founder and Chief Operating Officer of Africa Peace Support, and Former Representative of the United Nations Secretary-General for Guinea- Bissau and Head of the United Nations Peacebuilding Support Office in Guinea-Bissau (UNOGBIS). 


    Date:  Thursday, March 13, 2014 at 8:00 pm in EST, New York.


    Host: Chavie Brumer.


    Guest and Author: Ambassador Shola Omoregie.


    The memoir provides glimpses from the vantage point of someone who had seen action in the Front Line States in Southern Africa; of being at the heart of the United Nations Secretariat in New York at a critical time, including personally witnessing the inner dynamics of the Security Council; and of leading critical field assignments in Angola, Botswana and Guinea-Bissau, while also undertaking United Nations Ad Hoc assignments. It also offers lessons learned from his direct experiences as a United Nations expert and as a consultant for the African Union, to which he provided technical and political expertise during the establishment of its Peace and Security Council. This contribution, therefore, comes from someone who has observed developments at close quarters at the international level, including the transformation in the Security Council following the end of the Cold War.


    This fascinating multi-disciplinary memoir will be of special interest to policy makers, students on a broad range of academic disciplines and others with interest in, and committed to multilateral diplomacy in a multifaceted international system.


    To listen to the show, please stay on this page. To share your views or ask questions dial +1-(347) 989-8294 or join the chat room.

  • 01:18

    The Politics of Memory in the Great Lakes

    in Education

    ICERM Radio invites you to its Lecture Program on The Politics of Memory in the Great Lakes; 
    Featuring René Lemarchand, Ph.D., Emeritus Professor of Political Science at the University of Florida. 
    Date: Wednesday, October 30, 2013 at 4 pm in ET New York. 
    This lecture will cover Rwanda, Burundi and Eastern Congo, and will try to show how memorial phenomena (memory distorted, thwarted or falsified) continue to raise obstacles to peaceful co-existence in the region. In grappling with memorial issues, Prof. René Lemarchand draws heavily on Ricoeur's insights. His magnum opus on memory is an important contribution.
    René Lemarchand is Emeritus Professor of Political Science at the University of Florida. He has written extensively on the history and politics of the Great Lakes region of Central Africa. His book on RWANDA AND BURUNDI (1970), received the Herskovits Award from the African Studies Association. His latest works include THE DYNAMICS OF VIOLENCE IN CENTRAL AFRICA (2009) and an edited volume on FORGOTTEN GENOCIDES: OBLIVION, DENIAL AND MEMORY (2012). He served as regional advisor on governance and democracy with USAID, first in Abidjan (1992-1996) and then in Accra (1996-1998). He served as visiting lecturer at the University of California at Berkeley, Brown University, Smith College, Concordia University (Montreal) and the Universities of Helsinki, Copenhagen, Bordeaux and Antwerp.
    Join us to share your views/experiences or to ask Prof. René Lemarchand your questions. To participate, dial: +1-(347) 989-8294 when the show is on. International calls are accepted. 
     

  • 01:20

    Transforming Tragedy And Trauma Into Healing

    in Education

    Join us for another edition of ICERM Radio. 
    For this episode, we shall discuss "Reconciliation and Forgiveness after Deadly Violence: Transforming Tragedy and Trauma into Healing» with Dr. Ani Kalayjian, Board Certified Expert in Traumatic Stress and President, Association for Trauma Outreach & Prevention. 
    Date: Tuesday, October 29, 2013 at 11 am in ET New York. 
    Founded in 1990, the Association for Trauma Outreach & Prevention (ATOP), partners of Meaningfulword, has achieved international recognition as a leader in training humanitarian outreach professionals as well as responding to two decades of global and local disasters.  
    Meaningfulworld Humanitarian Outreach teams make a daily difference in people's lives helping to transform tragedy and trauma into healing through post trauma growth, guidance and meaning-making through a new world view. 
    Ask yourself ...Ask your friends...Ask your colleagues... What makes your world more meaningful? Join us to share your views/experiences or to ask Dr. Ani Kalayjian your questions. To participate, dial: +1-(347) 989-8294 when the show is on. International calls will be accepted. 

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