• 01:00

    Metalsmith BenchTalk with jewelry and hollowware designer Cynthia Eid

    in Art

    My Guest this Thursday, January 9 at 3 p.m. PST on MetalSmith BenchTalk is jewelry and hollowware designer and maker Cynthia Eid.


    About: Cynthia Eid's hammered metalwork has won awards for creativity and design, featured in many publications, and exhibited extensively. Eid's sculptural jewelry and hollowware is primarily done in Argentium Silver and formed through the creative use of hammers and/or a hydraulic press. Currently an independent metalsmith and educator, she is a Jeweler and Silversmith based in Massachusetts USA, teaching weekly classes at Metalwerx and the De Cordova Museum School, and workshops and short courses all over the USA. Previously, she has worked as a designer/maker in goldsmith galleries, and as modelmaker/supervisor in a gold jewelry factory. Cynthia earned her Master of Fine Arts in Metalsmithing and Jewellery Design from Indiana University in 1980 and has a B.S. in Art Education.


    The paradox that “soft”, fluid-looking metal has evolved from flat, stiff rectangles though force, determination, and tenacity enchants me. I am entranced by the metal’s progressive transformation -- through hammering, persuasion, and struggle --- from a lifeless plane of metal toward an object of  vibrancy, unity and fluidity.


    Experimentation, serendipity, a sense of play, and the subconscious mind determine the forms of my work. The forms have their roots in my gardens, and my meanderings through the woods and along the water’s edge. In my work, the allusions to nature are intentionally ambiguous, to encourage interactive response and contemplation by the viewer.


    For more info, visit: http://www.cynthiaeid.com.

  • 01:01

    Metalsmith BenchTalk Past Favorites with artist Barbara Minor

    in Art

    This Thursday, May 29th at 3 p.m. PDT, we'll be going back into the MetalSmith BenchTalk archives. We'll be re-airing one of our favoite chats from earlier this year with artist Barbara Minor. Barbara is well known for her innovative enameled beads, her distinctive enameled jewelry, and her unique enameled vessels.


    About: Barbara Minor completed her B.F.A. and M.F.A. degrees in jewelry and metalsmithing at University of Illinois and Indiana State University. She began enameling during graduate school and continued innovative explorations of enamel processes, with the support of research grants, while teaching at the State University of New York at Geneseo. During this time she began combining enameling with metalsmithing, jewelry forming and fabrication techniques to  create narrative reliefs, sculptural objects and jewelry.  


    Barbara now lives in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, where she is a full time studio artist concentrating on limited edition and one-of-a kind enameled beads, jewelry and small objects. A considerable portion of her studio time is devoted to researching and experimenting with enameling techniques in an effort to go beyond the normal and expected enameling results and to answer the ever present question of "what would happen if I did this?". Her research and experimentation leads to many new and wonderful enameled jewelry and bead designs, as well as subject matter for the in-depth enameling workshops she teaches.


    For more information about Barbara, visit http://www.barbaraminorenamels.com.

  • 01:01

    Metalsmith BenchTalk Past Favorites with Steve Shelby from Shelbyvision

    in Art

    This Thursday, January 23rd at 3 p.m. PDT, we'll be going back into the MetalSmith BenchTalk archives. We'll be re-airing one of our favoite chats from 2013 with metalsmith Steve Shelby from Shelbyvision, Artistry in Metal: metal sculpture and hollowware, metal art, and metal craft.
     
    About Steve: I have been working with metal in one way or another for over 35 years. First, with jewelry, then as an employee of Fox Products Corp., where I worked for 23 years making the metal parts for the contrabassoons. During this time I learned a lot about making tools and jigs, and that with persistence almost any problem can be solved. 
     
    My metal art is a synthesis of my love of nature and my love of working with metal.  I have made every effort to create honest designs, so that design and construction are thoroughly integrated. I'm not part of any "movement", and pretty much ignore what other artists are doing, which means that my designs have an originality mostly free from outside influence. My inspiration comes directly from nature.
     
    My 3D computer art is something I got into in a big way as a hobby for a few years, but I have not done anything with it for a few years. It is very time-consuming, and I made the decision that the time would be better spent working on my metal art.
     
    I live in rural Northeastern Indiana with my wife, Bobbie. We have four grown children. I have 20 acres of former worn-out farmland, most of which is being allowed to return to nature. I have a large pond for fishing and a smaller watergarden pond with water lilies, lotus, and goldfish. I like to take breaks from work and wander the grounds, observing the wildlife, sometimes taking pictures.
     
    For more info, visit http://www.shelbyvision.com.

  • 01:01

    Metalsmith BenchTalk with Steve Shelby from Shelbyvision

    in Art

    My Guest this Thursday, November 14th at 3 p.m. PST on MetalSmith BenchTalk is metalsmith Steve Shelby from Shelbyvision, Artistry in Metal: metal sculpture and hollowware, metal art, and metal craft.   About Steve: I have been working with metal in one way or another for over 35 years. First, with jewelry, then as an employee of Fox Products Corp., where I worked for 23 years making the metal parts for the contrabassoons. During this time I learned a lot about making tools and jigs, andthat with persistence almost any problem can be solved.    My metal art is a synthesis of my love of nature and my love of working with metal.  I have made every effort to create honest designs, so that design and construction are thoroughly integrated. I'm not part of any "movement", and pretty much ignore what other artists are doing, which means that my designs have an originality mostly free from outside influence. My inspiration comes directly from nature.   My 3D computer art is something I got into in a big way as a hobby for a few years, but I have not done anything with it for a few years. It is very time-consuming, and I made the decision that the time would be better spent working on my metal art.   I live in rural Northeastern Indiana with my wife, Bobbie. We have four grown children. I have 20 acres of former worn-out farmland, most of which is being allowed to return to nature. I have a large pond for fishing and a smaller watergarden pond with water lilies, lotus, and goldfish. I like to take breaks from my work and just wander the grounds, observing the wildlife, sometimes taking pictures.   For more information, visit http://www.shelbyvision.com.

  • 01:00

    Metalsmith BenchTalk on BlogTalkRadio with Andy Cooperman

    in Art

     
    My Guest this Thursday, March 8th at 3 p.m. PST on MetalSmith BenchTalk is acclaimed metalsmith and jeweler Andy Cooperman.   Andy's bio: "I have considered myself a metalsmith since 1980. It was in the late 70's, as an English major in college, that I first encountered the field—outside of the jewelry and hollowware that I had seen in shops and stores. There was a class room in the art building (I spent a lot of time in the art building) that seemed to hold some sort of focused excitement for those who were working inside. There was fire and small, strangely specific tools. The ringing of hammers, I think, was the sound that forced me to open the doors.   The fact that metal could be sawn, formed and—especially—forged in a relatively non-industrial place came as a surprise to me. And when I saw that it could be approached in ways that made it look unlike metal, that small almost animate things could be made with it, I was hooked. With a second major in Studio Art, I built a small back bedroom studio, spent some time exploring the very similar field of dental crown and bridge manufacture and worked at the bench in several jewelry stores. In 1984, I followed my wife Kim to Seattle, Washington. We have been here ever since.   For more about Andy and his work, visit: http://andycooperman.com/index.php

  • 01:00

    Metalsmith BenchTalk on BlogTalkRadio with Andy Cooperman

    in Art

     
    Join us this Thursday, October 13th at 3 p.m. PST on MetalSmith BenchTalk for a re-broadcast of one of our favorite episodes with the talented metalsmith, writer, and teacher Andy Cooperman of Cooperman Jewelry.    Andy's Bio:  'I have considered myself a metalsmith since 1980. It was in the late 70's, as an English major in college, that I first encountered the field—outside of the jewelry and hollowware that I had seen in shops and stores. There was a class room in the art building (I spent a lot of time in the art building drawing and painting) that seemed to hold some sort of focused excitement for those who were working inside. There was fire and small, strangely specific tools. The ringing of hammers, I think, was the sound that forced me to open the doors. The fact that metal could be sawn, formed and—especially—forged in a relatively non-industrial place came as a surprise to me. And when I saw that it could be approached in ways that made it look unlike metal, that small almost animate things could be made with it, I was hooked.   With a second major in Studio Art, I built a small back bedroom studio, spent some time exploring the very similar field ofdental crown and bridge manufacture and worked at the bench in several jewelry stores. In 1984, I followed my wife Kim to Seattle, Washington. We have been here ever since."    For more about Andy and his work, visit http://coopermanjewelry.com   Join us for what should be an enjoyable conversation!

  • 01:01

    Metalsmith BenchTalk on BlogTalkRadio with Andy Cooperman

    in Art

    My Guest this Thursday, June 2nd at 3 p.m. PST on MetalSmith BenchTalk is acclaimed metalsmith and jeweler Andy Cooperman.   Andy's bio: "I have considered myself a metalsmith since 1980. It was in the late 70's, as an English major in college, that I first encountered the field—outside of the jewelry and hollowware that I had seen in shops and stores. There was a class room in the art building (I spent a lot of time in the art building) that seemed to hold some sort of focused excitement for those who were working inside. There was fire and small, strangely specific tools. The ringing of hammers, I think, was the sound that forced me to open the doors.   The fact that metal could be sawn, formed and—especially—forged in a relatively non-industrial place came as a surprise to me. And when I saw that it could be approached in ways that made it look unlike metal, that small almost animate things could be made with it, I was hooked. With a second major in Studio Art, I built a small back bedroom studio, spent some time exploring the very similar field of dental crown and bridge manufacture and worked at the bench in several jewelry stores. In 1984, I followed my wife Kim to Seattle, Washington. We have been here ever since.   For more about Andy and his work, visit: http://andycooperman.com/index.php   Join us at blogtalkradio.com/whaleystudios for what should be an enjoyable conversation.

  • 01:01

    Metalsmith BenchTalk on BlogTalkRadio with Andy Cooperman

    in Art

    On the Thursday, at 3PM Pacific and 6PM Eastern on the March 3rd program, my guest is world traveler and recent consumer of the American health care system's services, the talented metalsmith, writer, and teacher Andrew Cooperman, of Cooperman Jewelry (see profile at: http://coopermanjewelry.com/profile.php). Andy's bio reads: 'I have considered myself a metalsmith since 1980. It was in the late 70's, as an English major in college, that I first encountered the field—outside of the jewelry and hollowware that I had seen in shops and stores. There was a class room in the art building (I spent a lot of time in the art building drawing and painting) that seemed to hold some sort of focused excitement for those who were working inside. There was fire and small, strangely specific tools. The ringing of hammers, I think, was the sound that forced me to open the doors. The fact that metal could be sawn, formed and—especially—forged in a relatively non-industrial place came as a surprise to me. And when I saw that it could be approached in ways that made it look unlike metal, that small almost animate things could be made with it, I was hooked. With a second major in Studio Art, I built a small back bedroom studio, spent some time exploring the very similar field of dental crown and bridge manufacture and worked at the bench in several jewelry stores. In 1984, I followed my wife Kim to Seattle, Washington. We have been here ever since." Please join us for what promises to be a very special program with 'the Coop'!!

  • 01:00

    Metalsmith BenchTalk with Andy Cooperman

    in Art

    On the Thursday, July 22nd program at 3PM Pacific and 6 PM Eastern, my guest is the globe hopping Andy Cooperman, who is fresh back from his 'tour de Turkey'. Andy is a world class metalsmith, writer, lecturer and mentor to many in the metal arts profession, and no stranger to Whaley Studios. For details please see Andy's complete profile at: http://coopermanjewelry.com/profile.php. Andy's bio reads: 'I have considered myself a metalsmith since 1980. It was in the late 70's, as an English major in college, that I first encountered the field—outside of the jewelry and hollowware that I had seen in shops and stores. There was a class room in the art building (I spent a lot of time in the art building drawing and painting) that seemed to hold some sort of focused excitement for those who were working inside. There was fire and small, strangely specific tools. The ringing of hammers, I think, was the sound that forced me to open the doors. The fact that metal could be sawn, formed and—especially—forged in a relatively non-industrial place came as a surprise to me. And when I saw that it could be approached in ways that made it look unlike metal, that small almost animate things could be made with it, I was hooked. With a second major in Studio Art, I built a small back bedroom studio, spent some time exploring the very similar field of dental crown and bridge manufacture and worked at the bench in several jewelry stores. In 1984, I followed my wife Kim to Seattle, Washington. We have been here ever since." Please join us for what promises to be a very special program.

  • 01:00

    Metalsmith BenchTalk with Nancy Megan Corwin

    in Art

    My guest for the Thursday, May 13th broadcast, 3PM Pacific, 6 PM Eastern, is an encore interview with the exceptionally talented author, lecturer, mentor, and coach in the art of 'chasing and repousse', Nancy Megan Corwin. See Megan's website here: http://www.nancymegancorwin.com/home.htm for more information.
    For background on Megan, her artist’s statement indicates: 'A few years ago, I began a series of small vessels which were initially inspired by a study of historic Japanese helmets and botanical forms. These seemingly unrelated elements were fascinating to contrast, and have led to a developing philosophy about the representation of the physiological and emotional course of a human life in a botanical format, and the transformative power of art.

    The textures and forms in these pieces are combination's of imaginary and existing plant parts. Many of the vessels are meant to hold scented oil, with the stoppers actually hair ornaments with long pins. The wearer pulls the hair pin from the container, withdrawing the oil and giving the piece a new life by placing it in the hair. The action of withdrawing the pin is much like that of the hummingbird extracting nectar from deep within the flower. This combination of form, action and content in the natural world is the basis for much of my work.

    The most current work represents a passion for the captured moment, memories and sensory experiences in an allegorical format. I find the combination of the exterior world of individual perception (visual and tactile forms) with the interior world of thought, attitude and programmed responses in a cultural context an intriguing avenue to pursue. The challenge is in expressing these ideas in hollowware and jewelry which carry their own social and cultural associations.' Please join us for another round with Megan!

  • 01:00

    Metalsmith BenchTalk with Andrew Cooperman

    in Art

    On the Thursday, November 5th program, my guest is metalsmith, writer, and teacher Andrew Cooperman, of Cooperman Jewelry (see profile at: http://coopermanjewelry.com/profile.php). Andy's bio reads: 'I have considered myself a metalsmith since 1980. It was in the late 70's, as an English major in college, that I first encountered the field—outside of the jewelry and hollowware that I had seen in shops and stores. There was a class room in the art building (I spent a lot of time in the art building drawing and painting) that seemed to hold some sort of focused excitement for those who were working inside. There was fire and small, strangely specific tools. The ringing of hammers, I think, was the sound that forced me to open the doors. The fact that metal could be sawn, formed and—especially—forged in a relatively non-industrial place came as a surprise to me. And when I saw that it could be approached in ways that made it look unlike metal, that small almost animate things could be made with it, I was hooked. With a second major in Studio Art, I built a small back bedroom studio, spent some time exploring the very similar field of dental crown and bridge manufacture and worked at the bench in several jewelry stores. In 1984, I followed my wife Kim to Seattle, Washington. We have been here ever since." Please join us for what promises to be a very special program with Andrew!

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