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  • 00:32

    Responding to HIV/AIDS in the Context of Violence Against Latinas

    in Women

    On March 10th at 2pm Eastern, the NLN will be hosting a Blog Talk Radio titled Responding to HIV/AIDS in the Context of Violence Against Latinas: Strategies that Work. This 30 minute discussion will feature Latina activists who will talk about the intersections of violence against women and girls and HIV/AIDS from a culturally specific perspective.  

  • 02:02

    Positively Dee for discussion about HIV/AIDS

    in Social Networking

    Join us for HIV/AIDS discussion bringing awarness to the community.


    Historically, the HIV/AIDS epidemic has affected more men than women. However, if new HIV infections continue at their current rate worldwide, women with HIV may soon outnumber men with HIV.


    HIV infection impacts a growing number of women in Illinois each year. Nearly 7,000 women in Illinois are currently known to be living with HIV and/or AIDS. Many hundreds of other women are probably living with HIV even though they are unaware of their own infection.


    HIV/AIDS disproportionately impacts African-American women in Illinois and the United States. Nationally, HIV infection is the leading cause of death for African-American women between the ages of 25 and 34. In Illinois, the number of HIV cases among African-American women continues to climb. Roughly 68 percent of Illinois women living with HIV are African American, while African Americans only make up 15 percent of the Illinois population. Caucasian women account for 16 percent of Illinois women living with HIV, while the Caucasian population represents more than 73 percent of Illinois residents. Latina women represent roughly 11 percent of the HIV/AIDS cases in women, while 13 percent of the Illinois population is Latino. Roughly 4 percent of women with HIV are from Native American, Asian, Pacific Islander and other communities.


    Women in their 30s are the most likely to be living with HIV/AIDS, and almost all Illinois women living with HIV are between the ages of 20 and 50.

  • 02:11

    Positively Dee for discussion about HIV/AIDS

    in Social Networking

    Join us for HIV/AIDS discussion bringing awarness to the community.


    Historically, the HIV/AIDS epidemic has affected more men than women. However, if new HIV infections continue at their current rate worldwide, women with HIV may soon outnumber men with HIV.


    HIV infection impacts a growing number of women in Illinois each year. Nearly 7,000 women in Illinois are currently known to be living with HIV and/or AIDS. Many hundreds of other women are probably living with HIV even though they are unaware of their own infection.


    HIV/AIDS disproportionately impacts African-American women in Illinois and the United States. Nationally, HIV infection is the leading cause of death for African-American women between the ages of 25 and 34. In Illinois, the number of HIV cases among African-American women continues to climb. Roughly 68 percent of Illinois women living with HIV are African American, while African Americans only make up 15 percent of the Illinois population. Caucasian women account for 16 percent of Illinois women living with HIV, while the Caucasian population represents more than 73 percent of Illinois residents. Latina women represent roughly 11 percent of the HIV/AIDS cases in women, while 13 percent of the Illinois population is Latino. Roughly 4 percent of women with HIV are from Native American, Asian, Pacific Islander and other communities.


    Women in their 30s are the most likely to be living with HIV/AIDS, and almost all Illinois women living with HIV are between the ages of 20 and 50.

  • 02:05

    Positively Dee for discussion about HIV/AIDS

    in Social Networking

    Join us for HIV/AIDS discussion bringing awarness to the community.


    Historically, the HIV/AIDS epidemic has affected more men than women. However, if new HIV infections continue at their current rate worldwide, women with HIV may soon outnumber men with HIV.


    HIV infection impacts a growing number of women in Illinois each year. Nearly 7,000 women in Illinois are currently known to be living with HIV and/or AIDS. Many hundreds of other women are probably living with HIV even though they are unaware of their own infection.


    HIV/AIDS disproportionately impacts African-American women in Illinois and the United States. Nationally, HIV infection is the leading cause of death for African-American women between the ages of 25 and 34. In Illinois, the number of HIV cases among African-American women continues to climb. Roughly 68 percent of Illinois women living with HIV are African American, while African Americans only make up 15 percent of the Illinois population. Caucasian women account for 16 percent of Illinois women living with HIV, while the Caucasian population represents more than 73 percent of Illinois residents. Latina women represent roughly 11 percent of the HIV/AIDS cases in women, while 13 percent of the Illinois population is Latino. Roughly 4 percent of women with HIV are from Native American, Asian, Pacific Islander and other communities.


    Women in their 30s are the most likely to be living with HIV/AIDS, and almost all Illinois women living with HIV are between the ages of 20 and 50.

  • 01:02

    MyNDTALK - World HIV+/Aids Day

    in Psychology

    World HIV+/AIDS DAY


    Join Dr. Pamela Brewer on MyNDTALK for a conversation with Steve
    Lerch of Metro Health in Washington, DC - for a conversation about
    myths and realities affecting those who are living with HIV+/AIDS. 
    For selected educational resources: www.MyNDTALK.org

  • 02:08

    Positively Dee for discussion about HIV/AIDS

    in Social Networking

    Join us for HIV/AIDS discussion bringing awarness to the community.


    Historically, the HIV/AIDS epidemic has affected more men than women. However, if new HIV infections continue at their current rate worldwide, women with HIV may soon outnumber men with HIV.


    HIV infection impacts a growing number of women in Illinois each year. Nearly 7,000 women in Illinois are currently known to be living with HIV and/or AIDS. Many hundreds of other women are probably living with HIV even though they are unaware of their own infection.


    HIV/AIDS disproportionately impacts African-American women in Illinois and the United States. Nationally, HIV infection is the leading cause of death for African-American women between the ages of 25 and 34. In Illinois, the number of HIV cases among African-American women continues to climb. Roughly 68 percent of Illinois women living with HIV are African American, while African Americans only make up 15 percent of the Illinois population. Caucasian women account for 16 percent of Illinois women living with HIV, while the Caucasian population represents more than 73 percent of Illinois residents. Latina women represent roughly 11 percent of the HIV/AIDS cases in women, while 13 percent of the Illinois population is Latino. Roughly 4 percent of women with HIV are from Native American, Asian, Pacific Islander and other communities.


    Women in their 30s are the most likely to be living with HIV/AIDS, and almost all Illinois women living with HIV are between the ages of 20 and 50.

  • 01:00

    Our Viral Lives: Young Activists Discuss HIV/AIDS

    in LGBT

    Unfortunately, some people believe that HIV/AIDS is over. Many of us know better. While the leaders of the early movement are very visibile to some -- names like Peter Staley and Mark Harrington come to mind -- some are unsure about who will be leading the movement of tomorrow. More importantly, what will the HIV/AIDS epidemic look like in the future? Today, we will speak with four young activists who recently presented at New York City's LGBT Center about their work as young HIV/AIDS activists. We will talk with Kyle Bella, the founder of Our Viral Lives, a digital narrative project, Martez Smith, an HIV+ black public health student, Kia Labeija an artist and photographer and a part of New York City's famed House of Labeija and Charlie Ferrusi, an MPH student who hopes to enter the world of government work and make advocacy for underrepresented populations his focus. 


    You can follow Mathew Rodriguez on Twitter at @mathewrodriguez. 


    You can follow Aaron Laxton on Twitter at @aaronlaxton. 

  • 01:33

    National Black HIV/AIDS Awareness Day

    in Health

    This year, February 7, 2015 marks the 15th year for National Black HIV/AIDS Awareness Day (NBHAAD). This is a national HIV testing and treatment community mobilization initiative targeted at Blacks in the United States and the Diaspora. The Black Aids Institute is the only organization that focuses their attention solely on black people with HIV/AIDS. This year there are some shocking findings and scientific evidence that speak about treatment and opportunities in the black community when it comes to the HIV/AIDs epidemic.National Black HIV/AIDS Awareness Day is a call for Black American to recognize that HIV is indeed a Black phenomenon & the reality that HIV disproportionately affects Black people and especially Black men who have sex with men (MSM) and Black women. Hank Millbourne will discuss information about the number of Black MSM diagnosed with HIV and the myth of black men and how they engage in sex. Hank will also talk about how the community should educate themselves, become more involved, and know what their status is and if you are infected to get treated. 

  • 01:04

    Black HIV/AIDS Awareness with Anna DeShawn & the QCrew

    in Entertainment

    HIV/AIDS is still a major issue in our community. What are we doing about it? Did you know that infection rates are on the rise? 


    Let's talk about it family. 

  • 01:05

    HIV/AIDS Today: It's NOT a Game!

    in Self Help

    It has been over 30 years since national attention has been drawn to the mystery illness devastating the masses.  Sadly, it continues to reign plaguing nation upon nation.  HIV/AIDS does not discriminate!  It impacts ALL ages and races.  We must NOT forget this.  Placing it in the depths of our subconscious will not make it go away. Caressa White, Community Education and Outreach Manager and Noshima Darden-Tabb, MSW, LICSW/ Lead Client-centered Care Coordinator of the University of North Carolina Clinical Trials Unit; Patrick Ingram creator of "The POZ Life of Patrick Ingram" series on You Tube and Dr. Krista Johnson, Howard University Associate Professor in the Department of African Studies share their intricate knowledge of the disease in order to empower others nationally and internationally.  Stop allowing FEAR to paralyze you!


    Knowledge Always Empowers!


     


    So, Let’s Talk!


    Talks with Sheba Radio Show


    Wednesday, December 3, 2014 @ 10pm EST


    Join us Live online at www.blogtalkradio.com/TalksWithSheba


    Or


    by phone at (347) 838-8992


     


    Learn More about HIV/AIDS:


    A. Tony Young, CEO


    Community Education Group


    3233 Pennsylvania Ave SE


    Washington, D.C.


    202 543-2376


    ____________________


    Patrick Ingram


    Youtube.com:  The Poz Life of Patrick Ingram


    Face Book: Patrick Ingram

  • 02:03

    HIV, AIDS & Dating

    in Radio

    Dating with HIV/AIDS
    Special Guest: Anonymous
    Host: Abdul
    Co-Host: Tracey
    Panelists: Willie, Jermaine, Mike Allen & Shunda
    Admin/Engineer: Gayle