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  • 00:31

    JCS, Graphic Novelist of Six Novels

    in Writing

    From living a nightmare, to building a dream. Graphic Novelist J.C.S. may only be 27 years old but she has come a long way. Abused as a child, and seemingly lost as a teen, she has turned her scraps into diamonds. So far, she has written six novels, has published five of those novels, and as also finished a trilogy known as Anguished Immortals.


    She will tell you, her goal was this: to publish and take care of her family. Her first attempt to write a novel came at the age of 15, and in between ten years, she tried and failed.


    Growing up in Denver, Colorado, it was realized (and said) countless times that opportunity in the workforce was greater and more stable than most states, especially for a woman. But having Systemic Lupus and two children only ten and a half months apart changed everything.


    Early 2012, inspiration came as J.C.S. decided to write her first romance novel. Even though it was a completed work, she saw that it wasn't yielding light on her talent. After doing a little research on the Archangel of Death and the Greek Goddess of War, Enyo, the makings of an Epic Fantasy trilogy had just begun.


    Taking her work to Authonomy and trying out the first two books, J.C.S. realized that sticking with something she loved, Epic Fantasy, did her better than trying to fit in.


    In 2013 J.C.S. wrote and published the first book to Bleeding Stars and Paper Hearts: Adrianna is Mine, following the same previewing and publishing path of her previous work. The audience from Authonomy helped her decide on publishing when not only had her book gone from #599 to #31 in a week, it stayed at #7 for three weeks and #1 for two.

  • 00:44

    NCTE on THE USE OF GRAPHIC NOVELS & A CONVERSATION ABOUT "BANNED BOOKS WEEK"

    in Education

    NCTE on THE USE OF GRAPHIC NOVELS & A CONVERSATION ABOUT "BANNED BOOKS WEEK"


    ST. Louis University Professor Jennifer Buehler and University of Central Florida's Jeff Kaplan are our guests


    www.ncte.org  @ncte


    Presented by The Great Books Foundation


    www.greatbooks.org @greatbooksfnd

  • 01:08

    Graphic Policy Radio with Guest Matt Bors

    in Pop Culture

    This Monday is a brand new episode of Graphic Policy Radio with a brand new guest, Matt Bors!


    Bors is an editorial cartoonist and editor of The Nib and was working at Medium running it since 2013. In 2012 he was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize and became the first alt-weekly cartoonist to win the Herblock Prize for Excellence in Cartooning. Currently he's running a Kickstarter to collecting some of the best political cartoons, comics journalism, non-fiction and humor.


    Eat More Comics packs more than 300 pages featuring dozens of the best cartoonists to ever toon a toon. I mean, it's going to be a large book.


    We're going to talk to him about the Kickstarter, The Nib, and more!


    We also want to hear from you. Tweet us your questions @graphicpolicy.

  • 01:58

    Graphic Policy Radio with guest Brenden Fletcher

    in Pop Culture

    This Monday night Graphic Policy Radio hits the airwaves with a brand new guest. Joining us for the first time is comic creator Brenden Fletcher.


    Brenden Fletcher has been a professional storysmith for more than a decade. Hailing from the worlds of theatre and film, Brenden made an impact on comics with DC Comics' award-winning Wednesday Comics anthology, penning the critically acclaimed Flash story with Karl Kerschl. Since then he's been developing new media and video game properties, most recently partnering with Ubisoft to extend its line of Assassin's Creed graphic novels. He's currently writing the Black Canary series for DC Comics while continuing to co-write Batgirl with Cameron Stewart and Gotham Academy with Becky Cloonan.


    We'll be discussing Brenden's entire career but especially his work on Gotham Academy, Batgirl, and the brand new Black Canary which debuts in comic shops this week.


    You can Tweet us your thoughts to @graphicpolicy.

  • 01:26

    Graphic Policy Radio: Politics and Comics of the Multiverses

    in Pop Culture

    This Monday night Graphic Policy returns with a brand new episode mixing comics and politics. Listen in as we talk live about some of the latest comic news.


    On this episode, we're discussing:



    DC Comics' Convergence has ended and a new focus on diversity has begun. We'll talk some of their new series and new directions including Midnighter, Batgirl, Batman, Green Lantern: The Lost Army, and more!
    Marvel's universe is in ruins and embroiled in Secret Wars. We discuss this massive event that will result in a whole new Marvel Universe when it's over. We already know some new series such as Invincible Iron Man, A-Force, Squadron Supreme, and Miles Morales headlining Spider-Man! We'll talk the event and what comes after.
    San Diego Comic-Con is right around the corner, we'll talk a bit about the convention, the announced panels, and some of the exclusives!


    We'll discuss all that and more! We of course want to hear from you too. Tweet us your thoughts @graphicpolicy.

  • 00:31

    Graphic Novels: Twilight Saga & Book Reviews!

    in Books

    In today's show I'll be sharing my thoughts on graphic novels after reading Page by Paige and The Twilight Saga's: Twilight Graphic Novels.


    I'll also be reviewing, "Fat, Broke, & Lonely No More!" by Victoria Moran & Bram Stoker's, Dracula!


    Then we'll talk a little bit about the whole goodreads vs. booklikes issue! What are your thoughts? Let me know in the comments!


     


    A lot is happening on today's episode so be sure to tune in & invite a friend!

  • 01:14

    Graphic Policy Radio with Guest Ming Doyle

    in Pop Culture

    This Monday is a brand new episode of Graphic Policy Radio, the show that mixes comics and politics. Joining us this episode is writer and artist Ming Doyle. Ming is writing a brand new series from DC Comics as part of their new direction, Constantine the Hellblazer.


    Ming Doyle was born in Boston to an Irish-American sailor and a Chinese Canadian librarian. In 2007, she earned her BFA from Cornell University with a dual concentration in painting and drawing. She has been working as a freelance illustrator and comic book artist ever since. She worked with such companies as Boom! Studios, Image, Tokyopop and Valiant, and now DC Comics. Works include (but not limited to) The Kitchen, Mara, Quantum and Woody, and now she's taking on writing duties with Constantine the Hellblazer.


    We'll be talking about her career as well as her take on John Constantine and what we can expect out of the new series.


    We also want to hear what questions you might have for her too. Tweet them to us @graphicpolicy.

  • 01:20

    Graphic Policy Radio with Guests Ales Kot and Spencer Ackerman

    in Pop Culture

    This Monday Graphic Policy Radio hits the air to discuss writer Ales Kot's newest series from Image Comics, Material!


    In Material a man comes home from Guantanamo Bay, irrevocably changed. An actress receives an offer that can revive her career. A boy survives a riot and becomes embedded within a revolutionary movement. A philosopher is contacted by a being that dismantles his beliefs. Look around you. Everything is material.


    Joining us in the discussion is not just Kot, but also guest Spencer Ackerman. Ackerman reported the uncovering of the Chicago Police Department's torture site which is a key point in Kot's series.


    Ales Kot writes because nothing else makes sense. He's responsible for screenplays, video games, graphic novels and products/experiences which do not even have their names assigned as of yet. His portfolio includes Disney, Warner Brothers, Image Comics, Marvel Entertainment, DC Entertainment, Dark Horse Comics and more.


    Spencer Ackerman is the U.S. national security editor of the Guardian, where he was part of the team that won the 2014 Pulitzer Prize for Public Service Journalism for the NSA surveillance revelations provided by whistleblower Edward Snowden. A former senior writer for Wired, Ackerman won the 2012 National Magazine Award for Digital Reporting for his series about Islamophobia in FBI counterterrorism training. Having reported from Iraq, Afghanistan, Guantanamo Bay and numerous ships, bases and a submarine, Ackerman in 2015 exposed a secretive incommunicado police detention center in Chicago called Homan Square. A Brooklyn NY native, his mother taught him to read with Bill Mantlo's Incredible Hulk run.


    We want to hear your thoughts too. You can Tweet them to us at @graphicpolicy.


     

  • 01:06

    Graphic Policy Radio with Guest Spencer Ackerman

    in Pop Culture

    Graphic Policy is back with a brand new episode with special guest, and award winning journalist Spencer Ackerman.


    Comics have often featured torture as a method for the heroes to extract information or get them to their goal. We most recently saw this in Marvel and Netflix's Daredevil, where torture is a key point in advancing the hero's plot. We'll discuss torture in comics, and its place in the modern stories and the world.


    Spencer Ackerman is the U.S. national security editor of the Guardian, where he was part of the team that won the 2014 Pulitzer Prize for Public Service Journalism for the NSA surveillance revelations provided by whistleblower Edward Snowden. A former senior writer for Wired, Ackerman won the 2012 National Magazine Award for Digital Reporting for his series about Islamophobia in FBI counterterrorism training. Having reported from Iraq, Afghanistan, Guantanamo Bay and numerous ships, bases and a submarine, Ackerman in 2015 exposed a secretive incommunicado police detention center in Chicago called Homan Square. A Brooklyn NY native, his mother taught him to read with Bill Mantlo's Incredible Hulk run.


    We want to hear your thoughts on the topic. You can Tweet them to us at @graphicpolicy or call in live.
     

  • 01:12

    Graphic Policy Radio talks Age of Ultron with Guest Sarah Jaffe

    in Pop Culture

    This Monday is a brand new episode of Graphic Policy Radio, and we're going to the movies again. Marvel's Avengers: Age of Ultron has already proven itself to be one of the biggest films of the year. The film has already earned $1.2 billion globally. But popularity doesn't necessarily mean the film has been universally praised. The movie has come under fire for its portrayal of women, the absence of women in tie-in products, and for other issues with the story itself. Joining us for the conversation is Sarah Jaffe.


    Sarah Jaffe is a reporting fellow at the Nation Institute and a giant nerd who once upon a time wrote about comics more than she wrote about politics, believe it or not, and she has lots of feelings about superhero movies AND their politics. Follow her on Twitter https://twitter.com/sarahljaffe


    So listen in, and join us in the conversation. Call in with your thoughts, or Tweet them to us @graphicpolicy.

  • 01:57

    Graphic Policy Radio Talks Mad Max: Fury Road

    in Pop Culture

    This Monday Graphic Policy Radio goes to the movies to discuss George Miller's Mad Max: Fury Road. 30 years have passed since the last Mad Max movie, but Miller has returned to his apocalyptic world with new leads, in one hell of a movie. Joining us to discuss the film are Steven Attewell and Dirk Lester.


    On the show we're excited to discuss not just the visual extravaganza, and practical fx, but also what the film has to say about women in action movies, its handling of sexism and slavery, and the global climate apocalypse.



    Steve Attewell – A political & union activist, Steve holds a PhD in History from the University of California, Santa Barbara. He is the founder and writer of Race for the Iron Throne as well as The Realignment Project
    Dirk Lester - The world’s 3RD deadliest #ComicbBook geek, film fanatic, political junkie, music nerd, #digital sherpa, #HumanRights activist – and yeah, it is all connected. You can see what Dirk has to say about the film here.


    So listen in and Tweet us your thoughts about the film to @graphicpolicy