• 00:49

    Genealogist, Gist family, African Am., Native Am , White Abolitionist

    in Education

    Join The Gist of Freedom as we speak with two Gist family genealogists, Dr. Natalie Pierce and Mr. James E. Gist. 


    Peter Gist Still the long lost enslaved brother of the Father of The Underground Railroad,  William Still. After 40 years Peter is reunited with his mother Charity Still!


    Samuel Gist was a resident of Great Britain and Virginia. In his will, Gist insisted his daughter free all the slaves she owned on the Gould Hill Plantation in Virginia. She complied and establish 6 free Gist Settlements throughout Ohio. Many of the descendants of the enslaved Gist settlers still live on the settlement.


    Samuel Gist was orphaned.  In 1739,  he was shipped to Virginia where he was indentured. 


    Sequoyah (George Gist) created the Cherokee alphabet, the syllabary.


    Secessionist South Carolina Governor – William Henry Gist, 1858-1860 The first to secede

  • 00:58

    Using Civil Rights Records to Find The Story in Your Family- Antoinette Harrell

    in History

    Using Civil Rights Records to Find The Story In Your Community and Family


    Please join genealogist and family historian Antoinette Harrell for a discussion of how and why researchers will want to explore the Civil Rights records to find relatives that were engaged in the Civil Rights movement throughout the South.  Ms. Harrell will use a case example of Mr. Herbert Lee a Civil Rights leader from Amite County, Mississippi to illustrate what was documented in Federal Records about him.


    Antoinette Harrell, a renowned genealogist, author and blogger whose genealogical research has been featured on Nightline News, People Magazine and many other national and international public media. Harrell is the host and producer of Nurturing Our Roots Television and Nurturing Our Roots Blog Talk Radio and was appointed Honorary Attorney General in the State of Louisiana in 2003 for her studies in genealogy. She is also one of the recipients of the ASLAH Award in 2013 for her outstanding services as a humanitarian activist and film maker and has been featured in “Chronicle On Civil Rights” & Civil Rights History from the Ground Up: Local Struggles a National Movement.


    The Department of Justice Records are available under the Civil Rights Division at the National Archives.


    The Civil Rights Division of the Department of Justice, created in 1957 by the enactment of the Civil Rights Act of 1957, works to uphold the civil and constitutional rights of all Americans, particularly some of the most vulnerable members of our society. The Division enforces federal statutes prohibiting discrimination on the basis of race, color, sex, disability, religion, familial status and national origin.

  • 00:57

    Using Civil Rights Records to Find the Story with Antoinette Harrell

    in History

    Using Civil Rights Records to Find The Story In Your Community and Family


    Please join genealogist and family historian Antoinette Harrell for a discussion of how and why researchers will want to explore the Civil Rights records to find relatives that were engaged in the Civil Rights movement throughout the South.  Ms. Harrell will use a case example of Mr. Herbert Lee a Civil Rights leader from Amite County, Mississippi to illustrate what was documented in Federal Records about him.


    Antoinette Harrell, a renowned genealogist, author and blogger whose genealogical research has been featured on Nightline News, People Magazine and many other national and international public media. Harrell is the host and producer of Nurturing Our Roots Television and Nurturing Our Roots Blog Talk Radio and was appointed Honorary Attorney General in the State of Louisiana in 2003 for her studies in genealogy. She is also one of the recipients of the ASLAH Award in 2013 for her outstanding services as a humanitarian activist and film maker and has been featured in “Chronicle On Civil Rights” & Civil Rights History from the Ground Up: Local Struggles a National Movement.


    The Department of Justice Records are available under the Civil Rights Division at the National Archives.


    The Civil Rights Division of the Department of Justice, created in 1957 by the enactment of the Civil Rights Act of 1957, works to uphold the civil and constitutional rights of all Americans, particularly some of the most vulnerable members of our society. The Division enforces federal statutes prohibiting discrimination on the basis of race, color, sex, disability, religion, familial status and national origin.


     


     


     

  • 01:05

    Gather at the Table Revisited with Sharon Morgan and Thomas Norman Dewolf

    in History

    Gather at the Table: The Healing Journey of a Daughter of Slavery and a Son of the Slave Trade --


     


    -- is the chronicle of a shared journey toward racial reconciliation. Informed by genealogy, it deals with race, social justice and healing from the traumatic wounds of slavery. Over a three year period, the authors traveled through 27 states, visiting ancestral towns, courthouses, cemeteries, plantations, antebellum mansions, and historic sites. 


    Bernice Alexander Bennett welcomes Sharon Leslie Morgan and Thomas Norman Dewolf to share this compelling journey with us.


    Sharon Morgan is a marketing communications consultant and a nationally recognized pioneer in multicultural marketing. An avid genealogist, she is the webmaster for OurBlackAncestry.com and is a founder of the Black Public Relations Society. 


    Thomas Norman DeWolf, author of Inheriting the Trade, is featured in the Emmy-nominated documentary film Traces of the Trade, which premiered at the Sundance Film Festival and on the acclaimed PBS series POV. DeWolf speaks regularly about healing from the legacy of slavery and racism at conferences and colleges throughout the United States. 

  • 00:49

    Genealogist, Gist family, African Am., Native Am , White Abolitionist

    in Culture

    Peter Gist Still the long lost enslaved brother of the Father of The Underground Railroad,  William Still. After 40 years Peter is reunited with his mother Charity Still!


    Samuel Gist was a resident of Great Britain and Virginia. In his will, Gist insisted his daughter free all the slaves she owned on the Gould Hill Plantation in Virginia. She complied and establish 6 free Gist Settlements throughout Ohio. Many of the descendants of the enslaved Gist settlers still live on the settlement.


    Samuel Gist was orphaned.  In 1739,  he was shipped to Virginia where he was indentured. 


    Sequoyah (George Gist) created the Cherokee alphabet, the syllabary.


    Secessionist South Carolina Governor – William Henry Gist, 1858-1860 The first to secede


     

  • 01:27

    African Americans in 19th Century Alexandria with Char McCargo Bah

    in History

    Prior to the Civil War, Alexandria, Virginia had a large freed African American and slave population who contributed a lot to the community and to the United States.  Each one of these groups helped build Alexandria, Virginia through their skilled labor, involvement in politics, teachers, churches, businessmen and etc. The history of Alexandria, Virginia cannot be told without including these African Americans.


    Char is posting blogs every two weeks on African American people in the 19th century that made a difference in the History of Alexandria, Virginia at http://theotheralexandria.com.


    Char McCargo Bah is the CEO/Owner of FindingThingsforU, LLC.  She has been a genealogist since 1981; appeared on numerous television interviews with CBS, FOX-5, Comcast, Public Broadcasting Services just to name a few and documentaries. She has also received numerous awards in 2014, 2013, 2010, and in 2009 for her work in genealogy. Char became a 2014 Living Legend in Alexandria, VA.  She was the City of Alexandria’s genealogist on the Alexandria Freedmen and Contraband Cemetery.  She is doing an advance study in genealogy at the University of Toronto and is co-author of “African Americans of Alexandria, VA: Beacons of Light in the Twentieth Century.”


     

  • 01:02

    The Power of Identity with Kathy Wigley on A Voice for Our Time EP06

    in Christianity

    Join host Charlana Kelly and her guest Kathy Wigley for a conversation about heritage and identity. Kathy is a Genealogist with a passion for heritage beyond her immediate family and previous generations. She actually has been searching the Word of God for clues about the lost tribes of Israel. We are all connected! Tune in for this riveting conversation about a topic that is as vital today as ever. If we don't know where we came from, then we sure won't know where we are going. Let's put an end to the identity crisis and rise up to be all God created us to be! #TRUTHmatters #SPEAKup #BeAVoiceForOurTime


    A Voice for Our Time is the flagship program on Voices of Truth Radio Network a SpeakTruth Media Group production (c) 2015.


     

  • 01:01

    Cherokee Genealogist Twila Barnes Discusses Fake Indian Elizabeth Warren

    in Politics

    Join Joe Dunn and Special Guest Cherokee Genealogist Twila Barnes for an hour discussion of Twila's Barnes' research into Senator Elizabeth Warren's ancestry claims.  Twila Barnes researched Elizabeth Warren during the 2012 MA Senate Race and debunked Elizabeth Warren's claims.  In Warren's new book, "A Fighting Chance," she writes that she was "hurt" and "angry" that people challenged her claims, for which, to this day, there is no evidence.  Twila Barnes can be found online at pollysgranddaughter.com, and on Twitter @pollysgdaughter.  You can listen on your phone or call in with your questions or comments simply by dialing (347) 826-9184, or listen online during the live broadcast and ON DEMAND 24/7.

  • 01:00

    Mapping the Freedmen's Bureau with Angela Walton-Raji and Toni Carrier

    in History


    Did you know that the majority of Freedmen's Bureau records are now digitized and available online for free, as well as the records of other institutions that served newly-freed African Americans during Reconstruction? Angela Walton-Raji and Toni Carrier have built a new website called "Mapping the Freedmen's Bureau - An Interactive Research Guide" (www.mappingthefreedmensbureau.com) to assist researchers in locating and accessing records of the Freedmen's Bureau, Freedmen's hospitals, contraband camps and Freedman's Bank branches. Researchers can use the website's interactive map to learn which of these services were located near their area of research interest. If the records are online, the map provides a link to the records that tell the stories of newly-freed former slaves in the American south. The goal of this mapping project is to provide researchers, from the professional to the novice, a useful tool to more effectively tell the family story, the local history and the greater story of the nation during Reconstruction.


    Angela Walton-Raji is an author, genealogist, guest lecturer and producer of the weekly African Roots Podcast and Toni Carrier  is the Founder of LowcountryAfricana, a free website dedicated to African American genealogy and history in SC, GA and FL.


     


    www.mappingthefreedmensbureau.com

  • 01:02

    What's New In Technology for Genealogist, Thomas MacEntee

    in History

    As a genealogist specializing in the use of technology and social media to improve genealogical research and to interact with others in the family history community, Thomas MacEntee relies upon his 25 years of experience in the information technology field.


    Thomas now shares his knowledge of technology and experience as a genealogist with others through various forms of social media and speaking engagements.  Through his business High-Definition Genealogy, he provides consulting services in the genealogy industry covering such areas as market research, education, technology and more.


    As the creator of GeneaBloggers.com, Thomas has organized and engaged a community of over 2,800 bloggers to document their own journeys in the search for ancestors.

  • 00:52

    Black Whalers w/ genealogist Earl Depass

    in Culture

    Black Whalers,  with genealogist Earl Depass!


    Whaling: Opportunities for African Americans 

    Four Whalers of African Descent

    The whaling industry, created several black abolitionists, entrepreneurs & philanthropists!

    Whaling Centered until the 1870s in New Bedford, employed a large number of African Americans. This was in part due to the Quaker tradition of tolerance in the New Bedford area, but more importantly, to the large demand for manpower in an expanding industry requiring unusually large crews.

    Some black seamen in the business were Americans, from the Northeast and the South, some were from the West Indies, and a significant group was from the Cape Verde Islands off the African coast. Whatever their origin, black seamen found acceptance as hard workers and skilled mariners in an industry that was physically demanding, dirty, and often financially unrewarding.

    When the center of the industry moved to San Francisco in the 1870s, African Americans continued to form a large percentage of the crews. The whaling business was no doubt the largest employer of African Americans seamen on the West Coast until it ended shortly before World War I.
     

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