• 00:15

    Special Announcements

    in History

    This episode is full of special announcements to dicuss changes going on behind the scenes at Fieldstone Common. It's important that you listen to this episode so that you will know how to listen to future episodes.

  • 00:05

    Elizabeth Shown Mills and more this November

    in History

    Happy Thanksgiving! I hope you've been enjoying the Thanksgiving holiday and that you've had the time to kick back and enjoy time with family and friends.


    We've had a spectacular month of November here on Fieldstone Common with shows featuring Gary Shattuck, Professor John Demos, Elizabeth Shown Mills and food historian Peter G. Rose.


    If you have some more time to relax before your holiday weekend is over, kick back and enjoy an episode or two of Fieldstone Common from the month of November.


    You'll find the podcast over at www.FieldstoneCommon.com. Just hit the play button which appears right in the middle of the page. You can also head over to iTunes - but be sure to search for Fieldstone Common Season 2. It's a different subscription than Season 1.


    I can't wait to hear what you think of the November shows!

  • 00:04

    Vampires and Tuberculosis - Is there a Connection?

    in History

    In this short podcast host Marian Pierre-Louis talks about the connection between vampires and tuberculosis in New England.  Did vampires exist in New England?  Find out so you can decide!
    More at http://www.FieldstoneCommon.com and on iTunes at Fieldstone Common Season 2.
    https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/fieldstone-common-season-2/id716857178

  • 00:03

    Do You Know what Benefit of Linens Means?

    in History

    In this short podcast host Marian Pierre-Louis talks about the legal term "Benefit of Linens" and how it could be used to save a new mother's life.
    Have you ever heard the term before?
    More at http://www.FieldstoneCommon.com and on iTunes at Fieldstone Common Season 2.
    https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/fieldstone-common-season-2/id716857178
     

  • 01:01

    Special First Anniversary Episode

    in History

    LIVE: THURSDAY, 29 August 2013 at 1:00pm EDT
    This week on Fieldstone Common we celebrate the first anniversary of Fieldstone Common! Join host Marian Pierre-Louis as she gives away 12 books and a Kindle paperwhite!
    This Thursday is your chance to get on the air on Fieldstone Common! We’ll be celebrating the 1st anniversary of Fieldstone Common and we’d love to have some comments, questions and feedback from the audience.
    There are two ways you can send feedback.
    1) LEAVE A VOICE MESSAGE
    Got to www.FieldstoneCommon.com. On the right hand side of the page you’ll the SEND VOICEMAIL tab. Click that and you’ll be prompted to record a voicemail.
    2) SEND AN EMAIL
    Send an email to mailbag@FieldstoneCommon.com and let us know what’s on your mind!
    The emails will be read and the voicemails will be played in between giving out 12 books and the grand prize!
    The Fieldstone Common audience is so important to making the show a success! Tell us what’s on your mind!
    You can also help by spreading the word. Share the www.FieldstoneCommon.com link on your Facebook or Google+ page or on Twitter. Thanks so much for supporting the show!
    For more details and upcoming schedule see: http://www.FieldstoneCommon.com

  • 00:58

    New England Research with Helen Ullmann

    in History

    This week on Fieldstone Common, Marian Pierre-Louis interviews genealogist Helen Schatvet Ullmann, FASG, CG about her work and books on southern New England. Helen has transcribed several books on early Connecticut court records which are particularly helpful to genealogists and historians researching in the colonial period. We'll be digging into the topics of colonial records, indexing, transcribing, editing and writing reports. 
    Helen Schatvet Ullmann, cg, fasg, is associate editor of the New England Historical and Genealogical Register and editor of NEHGS’s Western Massachusetts in 1790 project. She is the award-winning author of a number of compiled genealogies, including Descendants of Peter Mills of Windsor, Connecticut; Some Descendants of Roger Billings of Dorchester, Massachusetts; Descendants of John Mills of Stamford, Connecticut; A Mills and Kendall Family History; The Pierponts of Roxbury, Massachusetts; Some Descendants of John Sibley of Salem, Massachusetts; and Descendants of Richard Coman of Salem, Massachusetts and Providence, Rhode Island. In addition, she is the author of many genealogical articles, as well as the transcriber of Hartford County Court Minutes, Vols. 3 & 4, and Colony of Connecticut Minutes of the Court of Assistants, 1669–1711. Ullmann lives in Massachusetts.
    For more details and upcoming schedule see: http://www.FieldstoneCommon.com

  • 01:00

    The 1919 Boston Police Strike with James Redfearn

    in History

    LIVE: THURSDAY, 22 August 2013 at 1:00pm EDT
    This week on Fieldstone Common, Marian Pierre-Louis interviews author James Redfearn about the 1919 Boston Police Strike.
    Leading up to 1919 the Boston Police were working long hours for very little pay. In the post WWI era America was rocked by instability, the growth of labor and suffrage movement and the Red Scare. The mostly Irish police force was at odds with the Brahmin state leaders. The showdown led to chaos on the streets of Boston and helped pave the way for Calvin Coolidge, then governor of Massachusetts, to the White House.
    We'll talk about how James Redfearn researched the historical event for use in his novel, The Rising and Roxbury Crossing.
    James Redfearn, author of the Irish American historical saga, The Rising at Roxbury Crossing, has been an industrial-commercial photographer, a Massachusetts State Trooper and an investigator for a Boston law firm. He graduated from Harvard University with an ALM in Literature and Creative Writing. His stories have been published in the University’s Charles River Review and the New England Writers Network. He was raised in the Mission Hill neighborhood of Boston and now resides with his wife, Gail, west of the city where he enjoys his four children and eight grandchildren.
    In 1971, he began a twenty-one year career with the State Police, serving as a patrol officer, criminal investigator and academy instructor. He has lectured on investigative research methods at national Law Enforcement conferences.
    For more details and upcoming schedule see: http://www.FieldstoneCommon.com

  • 01:00

    Why Baseball Matters with Joanne Hulbert and David Lambert

    in History

    This week on Fieldstone Common we're talking about America's favorite past-time - Baseball!  Marian Pierre-Louis interviews Joanne Hulbert and David Allen Lambert, two baseball historians who are passionate about the sport.
    Did you know that baseball in America started before the Civil War? We'll be talking about old-time baseball, how it caught on in the United States and why it is so important.
    Joanne Hulbert is the author of Holliston, A Good Town. She is co-chair of the Society for American Baseball Research's (SABR) Baseball and the Arts Committee and co-chair of SABR's Boston Chapter group. She is the author of numerous historical baseball articles and player biographies. She resides in Mudville, a venerable, old neighborhood of Holliston, Massachusetts, a town rich in early baseball history. And, contrary to the popular presumption, there can be joy in Mudville.
    David Allen Lambert is the Chief Genealogist for the New England Historic Genealogical Society, and has served on the staff since 1993. His interest in genealogy started at the young age of seven, and has increased over the past four decades. He has published various articles in the New England Historical and Genealogical Register; the New Hampshire Genealogical Record, Rhode Island Roots, The Mayflower Descendant, and American Ancestors magazine. He is the author of A Guide to Massachusetts Cemeteries, and four other titles.
    For more details and upcoming schedule see: http://www.FieldstoneCommon.com

  • 00:59

    Connecticut's Indigenous Peoples with Lucianne Lavin

    in History

    This week on Fieldstone Common, Marian Pierre-Louis interviews Lucianne Lavin, author of Connecticut's Indigenous Peoples: What Archeology, History, and Oral Traditions Teach Us About Their Communities and Their Cultures.
    More than 10,000 years ago, people settled on lands that now lie within the boundaries of the state of Connecticut. Leaving no written records and scarce archaeological remains, these peoples and their communities have remained unknown to all but a few archaeologists and other scholars. This pioneering book is the first to provide a full account of Connecticut’s indigenous peoples, from the long-ago days of their arrival to the present day.
    Lucianne Lavin draws on exciting new archaeological and ethnographic discoveries, interviews with Native Americans, rare documents including periodicals, archaeological reports, master’s theses and doctoral dissertations, conference papers, newspapers, and government records, as well as her own ongoing archaeological and documentary research. She creates a fascinating and remarkably detailed portrait of indigenous peoples in deep historic  times before European contact and of their changing lives during the past 400 years of colonial and state history.
    Lucianne Lavin is Director of Research and Collections at the Institute for American Indian Studies, a research museum and educational center in Washington, CT. She received her M.A. and Ph.D. in anthropology from NY University.  She is an archaeologist who has over 30 years of research and field experience in Northeastern archaeology and anthropology.  Dr. Lavin has written over 100 professional publications and technical reports on the archaeology and ethnohistory of the Northeast.
    For more details and upcoming schedule see: http://www.FieldstoneCommon.com

  • 01:01

    The Philadelphia Nativist Riots with Kenneth Milano

    in History

    This week on Fieldstone Common, Marian Pierre-Louis interviews Kenneth Milano, author of The Philadelphia Nativist Riots.
    The outskirts of Philadelphia seethed with tension in the spring of 1844. By May 6, the situation between the newly arrived Irish Catholics and members of the anti-immigrant Nativist Party took an explosively violent turn. When the Irish asked to have their children excused from reading the Protestant version of the Bible in local public schools, the nativists held a protest. The Irish pushed back. For three days, riots scorched the streets of Kensington. Though the immigrants first had the upper hand, the nativists soon put the community to the torch. Those who fled were shot. Two Catholic churches burned to the ground, along with several blocks of houses, stores, a nunnery and a Catholic school. Local historian Kenneth W. Milano traces this tumultuous history from the preceding hostilities through the bloody skirmishes and finally to the aftermath of arrests and trials. Discover a remarkably intimate and compelling view of the riots with stories of individuals on both sides of the conflict that rocked Kensington.
    Kenneth W. Milano is a historical & genealogical researcher. He was born and raised in the Kensington neighborhood of Philadelphia. Milano received his degree in History from Temple University. His 2006-2011 column “The Rest is History” is well remembered by readers of Star Newspapers. He is one of the founders of the Kensington History Project.
    For more details and upcoming schedule see: http://www.FieldstoneCommon.com

  • 00:58

    Margaret Fuller A New American Life with Megan Marshall

    in History

    LIVE: THURSDAY, 18 July 2013 at 1:00pm EDT
    This week on Fieldstone Common, Marian Pierre-Louis interviews Megan Marshall, author of Margaret Fuller: A New American Life.
    From an early age, Margaret Fuller provoked and dazzled New England’s intellectual elite. Her famous Conversations changed women’s sense of how they could think and live; her editorship of the Transcendentalist literary journal the Dial shaped American Romanticism. Marshall tells the story of how Fuller, tired of Boston, accepted Horace Greeley’s offer to be the New-York Tribune’s front-page columnist. The move unleashed a crusading concern for the urban poor and the plight of prostitutes, and a late-in-life hunger for passionate experience. In Italy as a foreign correspondent, Fuller took a secret lover, a young officer in the Roman Guard; she wrote dispatches on the brutal 1849 Siege of Rome; and she gave birth to a son. Yet, when all three died in a shipwreck off Fire Island shortly after Fuller’s fortieth birthday, the sense and passion of her life’s work were eclipsed by tragedy and scandal. Marshall’s inspired account brings an American heroine back to indelible life.
    Megan Marshall is the author of The Peabody Sisters, which won the Francis Parkman Prize, the Mark Lynton History Prize, the Massachusetts Book Award in Nonfiction, and was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize in biography and memoir.A recipient of Guggenheim and NEH fellowships, Marshall teaches narrative nonfiction and the art of archival research in the MFA program at Emerson College.  
    For more details and upcoming schedule see: http://www.FieldstoneCommon.com
    Photo credit: Eric Antoniou

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