• 00:30

    Ask Dr. Annie Abram 3/29/10

    in Parents

    Join parenting expert Dr. Annie Abram, Ph.D. on March 29th, 2010. She will talk about how parenthood presents opportunities for self-transformation throughout our lifetime. The parenting experience provides on-going opportunities to think about our life stories and understand how this narrative informs our daily life. We become mindful by making the connection between today and yesterday allowing ourselves to live in the present.
    You Can Rewrite Your Life!

    Call (646) 716 52 32 at 12:30pm EST, 11:30am CT, 9:30am PT with your questions and to learn more about healthy parenting styles.

  • 00:30

    Ask Dr. Annie Abram

    in Parents

    Our show is an open conversation about mindful parenting, finding your voice as a parent and feeling competent in this role. Parenting is a relationship not a set of rules and it gives us the opportunity of a lifetime: to re-write our own life narrative. On our show we talk about developing a deeper understanding of ourselves in order to better understand our children.

  • 00:35

    "Helping Families Adjust to a Gay or Lesbian Child"

    in Parents

    Homosexuality as an identity is increasingly acceptable in our society. However, we have a long way to go in offering help to children and their families as a gay child struggles with his/her identity, and makes the decision to come out. We need to find ways to be supportive to families and the individual child. The dynamics of a family are invariably changed when a child comes out and the family needs to be considered as a system in order to begin to come to terms with their child's identity.


    Parents often feel stigmatized, and believe that they have not succeeded in being a good parent. "What did I do wrong?" Kids may blame themselves for even feeling any sort of sexual attraction to a same sex person, and fear they could lose their family, if it was even hinted at.  Although many parents suspect their child is gay, it is rarely a topic that is addressed openly before the child comes out.


    Today's guest, Dr Michael LaSala, the author of "Coming Out, Coming Home: Helping Families Adjust to a Gay or Lesbian Child,"  will help us understand the complexities of this concern and how we can navigate them.


    Michael C. LaSala, PhD is a psychotherapist and associate professor at the School of Social Work at Rutgers University. He has been in practice for more than 30 years and he currently treats LGBT individuals and families at the Institute for Personal Growth in Highland Park, NJ.


    Dr. LaSala’s book entitled “Coming Out, Coming Home: Helping Families Adjust to a Gay or Lesbian Child” is available from Columbia University Press and describes the findings and practice implications of a National Institute of Mental Health funded qualitative study of 65 gay and lesbian youth and their families.


    http://drmichaellasala.com/

  • 00:30

    Advocacy for Changing Domestic Violence Law

    in Parents

    Leigh Goodmark’s book, “A Troubled Marriage: Domestic Violence and the Legal System” challenges traditional ways domestic violence is understood by our society and its institutions. She sees WAVA (Women Against Violence Act, 1994) as a significant step forward in empowering women.  However, although disappointed that WAVA did not pass in 2013, Dr. Goodmark urges that we see it as an opportunity to rethink how we might improve it.  For example, we need to recognize that there is no “cookie cutter” solution for domestic violence.  Each abused woman’s circumstances are different and in order to truly understand and help her, it is essential that we help empower her to do what is best for her. “The justice system is simply one tool, and not always the best tool, among the many available to respond to domestic violence. Those who want to eradicate woman abuse must channel their energy, creativity, and passion into constructing multiple pathways for women to live autonomous lives free of abuse”. (Goodmark, Leigh (2011-12-01). A Troubled Marriage: Domestic Violence and the Legal System (p. 198). NYU Press short. Kindle Edition)


    Leigh Goodmark joined the Maryland Carey Law faculty in 2014 and teaches the Gender Violence Clinic, which she launched while a visiting professor here at the law school during the 2013-2014 academic year.


    Professor Goodmark is a member of the Editorial Board of Violence Against Women and serves on the Advisory Board for NVRDC, a victim service organization. Professor Goodmark is a member of the Maryland, District of Columbia and California bars.

  • 00:32

    What Causes Bullying?

    in Parents

    Bullying may be defined as the activity of repeated, aggressive behavior intended to hurt another person, physically, mentally or emotionally. Bullying is characterized by an individual behaving in a certain way to gain power over another person.[9] It can be classified into four types:[10]


    Physical, verbal, and relational bullying are most prevalent in primary school and could also begin in preschool. Cyber-bullying, arguably the most destructive and common form today, is more common in secondary school than in primary school.[10]   http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bullying#cite_note-:0-10


    If you hit your kid, you give them a message that it’s okay to hit others. And a new study examining the case histories of almost 2,500 American children confirms that spanking breeds bullies. Lead author Dr. Catherine Taylor of Tulane University... factored out the influences such as maternal mental health and use of drugs, domestic violence, neglect, income, age, race and education. And spanking emerged as the most important factor in determining which three-year-old children developed into aggressive five-year-olds. ("Mothers' Spanking of 3-Year-Old Children and Subsequent Risk of Children's Aggressive Behavior", C. A. Taylor, J. A. Manganello, S. J. Lee, J. C. Rice, Pediatrics 2010; 125:5 e1057-e1065; published ahead of print April 12, 2010, doi:10.1542/peds.2009-2678)


    Should we focus on early intervention with parents?

  • 00:33

    Managing Difficult Family Relationships During The Holidays

    in Parents

    Dr. Ruth Nemzoff, author of Don't Bite Your Tongue: How to Foster Rewarding Relationships with Your Adult Children (Palgrave/Macmillan, 2008) and Don't Roll Your Eyes: Making In-Laws Into Family (Palgrave/Macmillan, 2012) is our guest on Monday, December 8. She will be talking about the complexities of family relationships and how they are often exacerbated by the holiday season and family gatherings. How many times have you heard: - "prey for me - we're going to my mother-in law," or: "my son's and his wife for the holidays".



    Dr. Ruth Nemzoff is a resident scholar at Brandeis University's Women's Studies Research Center. She lectures on parenting adult children, relationships and family dynamics. Her papers are archived at the Schlesinger Library at Harvard University where she also holds a doctorate in social policy. She has served three terms in the New Hampshire Legislature and was New Hampshire Deputy Commissioner of Health and Welfare. She is the mother of four adult children, four in-law children and grandmother of eight. She lives in Brookline, MA with her husband Harris Berman, Dean of Tufts University School of Medicine.

  • 00:32

    Life Long Effects of Bullying

    in Parents

    October is National Bullying Prevention Month, and we will recognize it today with Dr. William Copeland, Associate Professor at Duke University Medical Center.


    Dr. Copeland recently wrote an article (published online 2/20, 2013 In JAMA Psychiatry) on the long-term effects of bullying behavior.  The findings as to what extent bullying can affect a person’s adult functioning are alarming and should be a “call to arms,” to create effective bullying prevention programs in all schools and communities.


    Dr. William Copeland is a clinical psychologist and epidemiologist, who trained at the University of Vermont and completed his clinical internship at Duke University Medical Center. He is currently an Associate Professor at the Center for Developmental Epidemiology in the department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Duke University Medical Center.

    Dr. Copeland’s research program is supported by the National Institute on Drug Abuse, the National Institute of Mental Health, and the National Alliance for Research in Schizophrenia and Depression (NARSAD).

  • 00:34

    What Can We Do To Help Our Children Develop Empathy And Healthy Self-Esteem?

    in Parents

    RELATIONSHIPS MATTER - with Dr. Annie Abram
    Whether it's your child, spouse, your co-worker or the person behind the counter at the dry cleaners, how you interact with others is what makes up the fabric of your day. Coping, cajoling, conceding or just standing your ground could all be invoked over the course of an hour. How you respond can either make or break your day. On Relationships Matter, we will peel the onion, helping you to understand your interactions with others so that you can create meaningful communications with the people in your life.  Join Dr. Annie Abram and expert guests for a deeper understanding of your relationships, how to make them better and most importantly how to make them matter.


    Listen live today at 12:30 PM EST!


    CDD (Compassionate Deficit Disorder) is one of the many disorders coined by Dr. Diane Levin to describe the effects of children spending time in front of a screen, whether it be a computer, TV, iPad, mobile phone, Xbox or other electronic device. Professor Levin has been studying this troubling problem for 30 years with little support from those with the authority and resources to join her cause, not to mention corporate America and the Media who have a huge economic investment in selling electronic devices and toys (with or without screens) to young children.


    Dr. Levin will help us make sense of how a "Remote Controlled Childhood" (title of Professor Levin's latest book) is putting the healthy development of our young people at risk.

  • 00:38

    The Myth of The Post-Racial Society

    in Parents

    Dr. Yancy, Professor of Philosophy at Duquesne, works primarily in the areas of critical philosophy of race, critical whiteness studies, and philosophy of the Black experience.Today, Dr Yancy, will help us understand the killing of Michael Brown as part of America's deeply embedded racism.
     


    GEORGE YANCY is professor in the Department of Philosophy at Duquesne University. He received his Ph.D. (with honors) in philosophy from Duquesne University. He received an M.A. in philosophy from Yale University and a B.A. (cum laude) in philosophy from the University of Pittsburgh. He received a second M.A. from New York University in Black Studies. He has authored, edited, and co-edited 16 books, including Black Bodies, White Gazes: The Continuing Significance of Race (Rowman & Littlefield, 2008), Look, a White! Philosophical Essays on Whiteness (Temple University Press, 2012), and Pursuing Trayvon Martin (Lexington Books, 2012). His philosophical areas of specialization are Critical Whiteness Studies, Critical Philosophy of Race and African American Philosophy. 

  • 00:32

    You Can Help Raise Awareness re: Domestic Violence

    in Parents

    Today our guest, Rita Bailey, Co-Chair of the Domestic Violence and Abuse Partnership Task Force in Darien, CT,  will describe how a grass roots community group can help raise domestic violence awareness.
    Consider the statistics:



    Every 9 seconds a woman is battered in the United States.
    Conservatively, each year 1 million women suffer nonfatal violence by an intimate.
    Nearly 1 in 3 women experience domestic violence in their lifetime.
    Ninety to ninety-five percent of domestic violence victims are women.
    As many as 324,000 women each year experience intimate partner violence during their pregnancy.
    The U.S. Department of Justice reported that 37 percent of all women who sought care in hospital emergency rooms for violence-related injuries were injured by a current or former spouse, boyfriend, or girlfriend.
    Forty percent of teenage girls age 14 to 17 report knowing someone their age who has been hit or beaten by a boyfriend.
    Studies of the Surgeon General's office reveal that domestic violence is the leading cause of injury to women between the ages of 15 and 44, more common than automobile accidents, muggings, and cancer deaths combined. Other research has found that half of all women will experience some form of violence from their partners during marriage, and that more than one-third are battered repeatedly every year.


    Domestic Violence occurs in all communities. Victims have no profile.? They are found in all ethnic and demographic groups, can have no education or hold advanced degrees in professions such as medicine, law, or be voted the most upstanding citizen and perhaps even volunteer their time to combating ?domestic violence. ?You may be surprised to learn that the above statistics ?are undoubtedly on the low side?.

  • 00:39

    What Is Love?

    in Parents

    Is it possible to repair a broken marriage? Can it be repaired or is it best to throw in the towel?
    How do we maintain loving relationships to our loved ones? Is there a formula? Does couple's counseling really work?

    Along comes Dr. Sue Johnson who tells us that our attachment styles can change through reliable and loving relationships. Today, Dr. Johnson will help us understand how we can find connection to our loved ones.


    Dr. Sue Johnson is an author, clinical psychologist, researcher, professor, popular presenter and speaker and one of the leading innovators in the field of couple therapy.


    She is the primary developer of Emotionally Focused Couples Therapy (EFT) which has demonstrated its effectiveness in over 25 years of peer-reviewed clinical research. Sue Johnson is founding Director of the International Centre for Excellence in Emotionally Focused Therapy and Distinguished Research Professor at Alliant University in San Diego, California, as well as Professor of Clinical Psychology at the University of Ottawa, Canada.


    As author of the best-selling book: Hold Me Tight, Seven Conversations for a Lifetime of Love, Sue Johnson has created for the general public, a self-help version of her groundbreaking research about relationships – how to enhance them, how to repair them and how to keep them.


    Her most recent book, Love Sense, The Revolutionary New Science of Romantic Relationships outlines the new logical understanding of why and how we love – based on new scientific evidence and cutting-edge research.


    Dr. Johnson’s best known professional books include, The Practice of Emotionally Focused Couple Therapy: Creating Connection (2004) and Emotionally Focused Couple Therapy with Trauma Survivors (2002).


    Sue Johnson lives in Ottawa with her husband.

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