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  • 00:56

    Black Reconstruction #LaShawnAllenMuhammad 323.927.2913

    in Business

    Hosted By: LaShawn Allen-Muhammad


    Who were the first Black Elected Officials? During the month of November, as the country gears up to re-elect or vote in the next wave of politicians, Black Reconstruction will revisit the Reconstruction era to pay homage to the Black Men who came before Obama.  During this tumultuous time, Blacks not only established townships, they also positioned themselves to be an integral part of government.   


    At a Glance.. In 1855, Brownhelm Township, founded by Col. Henry Brown,  gained notoriety throughout the U.S, when the township elected an African-American to government office.  The NY Syracuse Daily Journal, May 31, 1855 reported that John Mercer Langston was a fugitive slave who had been elected clerk.  Brownhelm's early residents had long been known for their strong anti-slavery stance; and Col. Henry Brown's home on the Lake Shore was often a final stop on the Underground Railroad, before reaching Canada by boat.    African-American Firsts: Government


    Local elected official: John Mercer Langston, 1855, town clerk of Brownhelm Township, Ohio.


    State elected official: Alexander Lucius Twilight, 1836, the Vermont legislature.


    Governor  (appointed): P.B.S. Pinchback served as governor of Louisiana from Dec. 9, 1872-Jan. 13, 1873, during impeachment proceedings against the elected governor.


    U.S. Representative: Joseph Rainey became a Congressman from South Carolina in 1870 and was reelected four more times. 


    U.S. Senator: Hiram Revels became Senator from Mississippi from Feb. 25, 1870, to March 4, 1871, during Reconstruction.  


    There have only been a total of five black senators in U.S. history: the remaining two are Blanche K. Bruce [1875-1881] and Barack Obama 

  • Black Reconstruction #LaShawnAllenMuhammad 323.927.2913

    in Business

    Hosted By: LaShawn Allen-Muhammad


    Who were the first Black Elected Officials? During the month of November, as the country gears up to re-elect or vote in the next wave of politicians, Black Reconstruction will revisit the Reconstruction era to pay homage to the Black Men who came before Obama.  During this tumultuous time, Blacks not only established townships, they also positioned themselves to be an integral part of government.   


    At a Glance.. In 1855, Brownhelm Township, founded by Col. Henry Brown,  gained notoriety throughout the U.S, when the township elected an African-American to government office.  The NY Syracuse Daily Journal, May 31, 1855 reported that John Mercer Langston was a fugitive slave who had been elected clerk.  Brownhelm's early residents had long been known for their strong anti-slavery stance; and Col. Henry Brown's home on the Lake Shore was often a final stop on the Underground Railroad, before reaching Canada by boat.    African-American Firsts: Government


    Local elected official: John Mercer Langston, 1855, town clerk of Brownhelm Township, Ohio.


    State elected official: Alexander Lucius Twilight, 1836, the Vermont legislature.


    Governor (appointed): P.B.S. Pinchback served as governor of Louisiana from Dec. 9, 1872-Jan. 13, 1873, during impeachment proceedings against the elected governor.


    U.S. Representative: Joseph Rainey became a Congressman from South Carolina in 1870 and was reelected four more times. 


    U.S. Senator: Hiram Revels became Senator from Mississippi from Feb. 25, 1870, to March 4, 1871, during Reconstruction.  


    There have only been a total of five black senators in U.S. history: the remaining two are Blanche K. Bruce [1875-1881] and Barack Obama 

  • 00:48

    Baltimore,gays, the supreme court, and the constitution!

    in Christianity

    So how should we Christians react to RIOTS ( Not protests) in Baltimore. Gay's redefining the word marriage, The Supreme court having WAY TOO MUCH power and our missing Constitution? Is it k to be angry? If so what should we do with our anger? What would Jesus do? Hmmmm... 

  • 01:30

    The Constitution and its Amendments

    in Education

    The concept of "Citizenship", and the nationalist propaganda which accompanies it, are as old as the hills. The fear-stricken are the most likely to give up freedom for a sense of security -- the high priests of even the most "uncivilized" peoples understand this principle and utilize it to this day. Citizens are those who have given up a freeman's sovereignty for the sake of virtual anonymity in the collective, even in a so-called "capitalist" or "democratic" society.


    The Constitution for the United States is one of the most idolized documents in recent history, but why? What does it even have to say? What does it have to do with your life? Does it protect you from your own personal boogeyman?


    Join Burt, Greg, Casey, and our special guest Susan (ghostwriter of Beyond the National Myth:Waking up in the Land of the Free, and author of The Quality Life Plan: 7 Steps to Uncommon Financial Security) as we discuss these ideas and more.


    We'll be taking callers throughout the show tonight at (347) 637-3632 -- feel free to give us a shout!

  • 01:30

    The Constitution and its Amendments, pt. 2

    in Education

    The concept of "Citizenship", and the nationalist propaganda which accompanies it, are as old as the hills. The fear-stricken are the most likely to give up freedom for a sense of security -- the high priests of even the most "uncivilized" peoples understand this principle and utilize it to this day. Citizens are those who have given up a freeman's sovereignty for the sake of virtual anonymity in the collective, even in a so-called "capitalist" or "democratic" society.


    The Constitution for the United States is one of the most idolized documents in recent history, but why? What does it even have to say? What does it have to do with your life? Does it protect you from your own personal boogeyman?


    Join Burt, Greg, Casey, and guests as we discuss these ideas and more!


    We'll be taking callers throughout the show tonight at (347) 637-3632 -- feel free to give us a shout!

  • Black Reconstruction #LaShawnAllenMuhammad 323.927.2913

    in Business

    Hosted By: LaShawn Allen-Muhammad


    Who were the first Black Elected Officials? During the month of November, as the country gears up to re-elect or vote in the next wave of politicians, Black Reconstruction will revisit the Reconstruction era to pay homage to the Black Men who came before Obama.  During this tumultuous time, Blacks not only established townships, they also positioned themselves to be an integral part of government.   


    At a Glance.. In 1855, Brownhelm Township, founded by Col. Henry Brown,  gained notoriety throughout the U.S, when the township elected an African-American to government office.  The NY Syracuse Daily Journal, May 31, 1855 reported that John Mercer Langston was a fugitive slave who had been elected clerk.  Brownhelm's early residents had long been known for their strong anti-slavery stance; and Col. Henry Brown's home on the Lake Shore was often a final stop on the Underground Railroad, before reaching Canada by boat.    African-American Firsts: Government


    Local elected official: John Mercer Langston, 1855, town clerk of Brownhelm Township, Ohio.


    State elected official: Alexander Lucius Twilight, 1836, the Vermont legislature.


    Governor (appointed): P.B.S. Pinchback served as governor of Louisiana from Dec. 9, 1872-Jan. 13, 1873, during impeachment proceedings against the elected governor.


    U.S. Representative: Joseph Rainey became a Congressman from South Carolina in 1870 and was reelected four more times. 


    U.S. Senator: Hiram Revels became Senator from Mississippi from Feb. 25, 1870, to March 4, 1871, during Reconstruction.  


    There have only been a total of five black senators in U.S. history: the remaining two are Blanche K. Bruce [1875-1881] and Barack Obama 

  • 01:02

    Article 5 of the US Constitution

    in Politics

    "The Congress, whenever two thirds of both houses shall deem it necessary, shall propose amendments to this Constitution, or, on the application of the legislatures of two thirds of the several states, shall call a convention for proposing amendments, which, in either case, shall be valid to all intents and purposes, as part of this Constitution, when ratified by the legislatures of three fourths of the several states, or by conventions in three fourths thereof, as the one or the other mode of ratification may be proposed by the Congress; provided that no amendment which may be made prior to the year one thousand eight hundred and eight shall in any manner affect the first and fourth clauses in the ninth section of the first article; and that no state, without its consent, shall be deprived of its equal suffrage in the Senate. " Article Five of the United States Constitution describes the process whereby the Constitution may be altered. Altering the Constitution consists of proposing an amendment or amendments and subsequent ratification..


    Tonite go live with the Founder of " Citizen Iniatives " Charles Kacprowicz and director Mike Coons.    Charles works with his Directors to advance Article V "Single Issue" Amendment Conventions through State Legislatures, bypassing Congress, the Courts and Executive Branch. He is author of the book,  "Countermand Amendment, The Missing Piece in the Article 5 Puzzle."


    This show sponsored by Studentsforabetterfuture.com


    Studentsforabetterfuture.com is a registered 501 (C) (3) non profit.  Your dollars are tax deductible Please donate here : DONATE 

  • 02:06

    Am I Losing My Rights Under the Constitution

    in Radio

    Tonight's show is all about the constitution. We are looking at all our rights under the constitution that are slowly being desolved without "we the people," taking a vote on it.

  • 01:30

    Black Reconstruction #LaShawnAllenMuhammad 323.927.2913

    in Finance

    Hosted By: LaShawn Allen-Muhammad


    Who were the first Black Elected Officials? During the month of November, as the country gears up to re-elect or vote in the next wave of politicians, Black Reconstruction will revisit the Reconstruction era to pay homage to the Black Men who came before Obama.  During this tumultuous time, Blacks not only established townships, they also positioned themselves to be an integral part of government.   


    At a Glance.. In 1855, Brownhelm Township, founded by Col. Henry Brown,  gained notoriety throughout the U.S, when the township elected an African-American to government office.  The NY Syracuse Daily Journal, May 31, 1855 reported that John Mercer Langston was a fugitive slave who had been elected clerk.  Brownhelm's early residents had long been known for their strong anti-slavery stance; and Col. Henry Brown's home on the Lake Shore was often a final stop on the Underground Railroad, before reaching Canada by boat.    African-American Firsts: Government


    Local elected official: John Mercer Langston, 1855, town clerk of Brownhelm Township, Ohio.


    State elected official: Alexander Lucius Twilight, 1836, the Vermont legislature.


    Governor (appointed): P.B.S. Pinchback served as governor of Louisiana from Dec. 9, 1872-Jan. 13, 1873, during impeachment proceedings against the elected governor.


    U.S. Representative: Joseph Rainey became a Congressman from South Carolina in 1870 and was reelected four more times. 


    U.S. Senator: Hiram Revels became Senator from Mississippi from Feb. 25, 1870, to March 4, 1871, during Reconstruction.  


    There have only been a total of five black senators in U.S. history: the remaining two are Blanche K. Bruce [1875-1881] and Barack Obama 


     

  • 02:59

    Four Clauses in the U.S. Constitution Can Court Martial Obama

    in Politics Conservative

    President Obama is the Commander-in Chief, the top most position in the United States military. Does this mean he is open to Court Martial? Our guest Christine Timmon says , YES!  Hear which Four Clauses in the U.S. Constitution Can Court Martial Obama.


    Our Guest: Timmon is an alumni of Thomas M. Cooley Law Library. She worked with the 104th Congress to reform welfare and drug dealing. In 2012,she worked towards exposing voter fraud. She is a Constitutional Consultant. Immigration is now the focus of her work. She exposes how drug deals aided the invasion of America and how the Constitution takes America back. Recently she has been in Washington D.C. also Discover the 12 Words that can Reform Immigration and Citizenship.


    Join the host Robert Jetter, Jr., panelists Activist Cindy Todd, Constitutional scholar Kelly Mordecai, and Dan Gray former columnist of the Washington Times. Call in and you stay on the show. You can Join our Round Table Discussion. Share the Link to the Live Show and Podcast.


    Bards Logic is the Grassroots, We the People Show.


    Please visit and Like Our Page on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BardsLogicPoliticalTalk

  • 01:30

    Black Reconstruction #LaShawnAllenMuhammad 323.927.2913

    in Politics

    Hosted By: LaShawn Allen-Muhammad


    Who were the first Black Elected Officials? During the month of November, as the country gears up to re-elect or vote in the next wave of politicians, Black Reconstruction will revisit the Reconstruction era to pay homage to the Black Men who came before Obama.  During this tumultuous time, Blacks not only established townships, they also positioned themselves to be an integral part of government.   


    At a Glance.. In 1855, Brownhelm Township, founded by Col. Henry Brown,  gained notoriety throughout the U.S, when the township elected an African-American to government office.  The NY Syracuse Daily Journal, May 31, 1855 reported that John Mercer Langston was a fugitive slave who had been elected clerk.  Brownhelm's early residents had long been known for their strong anti-slavery stance; and Col. Henry Brown's home on the Lake Shore was often a final stop on the Underground Railroad, before reaching Canada by boat.    African-American Firsts: Government


    Local elected official: John Mercer Langston, 1855, town clerk of Brownhelm Township, Ohio.


    State elected official: Alexander Lucius Twilight, 1836, the Vermont legislature.


    Governor (appointed): P.B.S. Pinchback served as governor of Louisiana from Dec. 9, 1872-Jan. 13, 1873, during impeachment proceedings against the elected governor.


    U.S. Representative: Joseph Rainey became a Congressman from South Carolina in 1870 and was reelected four more times. 


    U.S. Senator: Hiram Revels became Senator from Mississippi from Feb. 25, 1870, to March 4, 1871, during Reconstruction.  


    There have only been a total of five black senators in U.S. history: the remaining two are Blanche K. Bruce [1875-1881] and Barack Obama 


     


     

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