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  • 01:01

    A Conversation With Dr. Carol D. Lee: Positives of African-Centered Education

    in Education

    In Chicago 1969, Lee and her husband helped to found the Institute of Positive Education. This community-based, African-centered organization sponsored seminars on issues with which the black community wrestled, and it held classes, ran a food co-op and farm, and published a magazine and pamphlets.


    In 1972, under Lee’s direction, the institute even began its own school, New Concept Development Center, which started as a Saturday program and expanded into a full-fledged school by 1974. Both the institute and New Concept Development Center still operate today, not to mention the three charter schools in Chicago that Lee also cofounded: the Betty Shabazz International Charter School, the Barbara A. Sizemore Academy, and the DuSable Leadership Academy.


    African-centered schools, such as New Concept and the Betty Shabazz International Charter School campuses, take an expansive view of cultures, Lee says.


    Lee received her PhD in education from the University of Chicago in 1991 and currently is a professor in the Learning Sciences Program of the School of Education and Social Policy with a joint appointment in African American studies, both at Northwestern University. She is also well known for her “cultural modeling” theory, which provides a framework for the design of instruction in ways that leverage everyday knowledge of youth, especially youth of color, to support discipline specific learning. One goal is to use the everyday knowledge of these students to teach vital concepts.

  • 01:01

    What Are The Positives of An African-Centered Education?

    in Education

    A Conversation With Dr. Carol D. Lee: What Are The Positives of An African-Centered Education?
    In Chicago 1969, Lee and her husband helped to found the Institute of Positive Education. This community-based, African-centered organization sponsored seminars on issues with which the black community wrestled, and it held classes, ran a food co-op and farm, and published a magazine and pamphlets.
    In 1972, under Lee’s direction, the institute even began its own school, New Concept Development Center, which started as a Saturday program and expanded into a full-fledged school by 1974. Both the institute and New Concept Development Center still operate today, not to mention the three charter schools in Chicago that Lee also cofounded: the Betty Shabazz International Charter School, the Barbara A. Sizemore Academy, and the DuSable Leadership Academy.
    African-centered schools, such as New Concept and the Betty Shabazz International Charter School campuses, take an expansive view of cultures, Lee says.
    Lee received her PhD in education from the University of Chicago in 1991 and currently is a professor in the Learning Sciences Program of the School of Education and Social Policy with a joint appointment in African American studies, both at Northwestern University. She is also well known for her “cultural modeling” theory, which provides a framework for the design of instruction in ways that leverage everyday knowledge of youth, especially youth of color, to support discipline specific learning. One goal is to use the everyday knowledge of these students to teach vital concepts.

  • 02:01

    Do African Centered Schools and HBCUs Really Prepare Students For The "Real World"?

    in Women

    Historically Black Colleges and Universities have been under attack for decades, accused of being "unnecessary" in this supposedly "color blind" society. Many such schools, founded after Emancipation and providing that much needed boost for African Americans who had been deprived of education for generations, are now struggling with underfunding and lack of financial support. Likewise, many African Centered grammar schools and even some high schools, founded during the movement for black empowerment, have struggled to remain alive, also lacking the financial support to maintain dedicated teachers and quality programs.  Makita Kheperu, Chief Education officer at Betty Shabazz International Charter School and graduate of Howard University, examines the need for  education based on history culture and a collective goal for achievement as provided by institutions that stress pride in racial heritage. As a former school principal, classroom teacher and a parent of two children attending the PUSH Excel HBCU Tour during this Spring Break, she discusses the effects of culturally based education on preparing African American students to succeed in the "real world."

  • 02:30

    UN Experts Extremely Are Concerned About the State of African Americans in US

    in Culture

    Listen to The Michael Imhotep Show, Thurs. Feb. 4th, 10pm-12midnight EST (7pm – 9pm PST) with host Michael Imhotep of The African History Network.  CALL IN WITH Questions/Comments at 1-888-669-2281.  POST YOUR COMMENTS.  WE MAY READ THEM ON AIR.  Listen online at http://tunein.com/radio/Empowerment-Radio-Network-s199313/ or by downloading the "TuneIn Radio" app to your smartphone and search for "Empowerment Radio Network" or at www.AfricanHistoryNetwork.com.


     


    1) A Judge Rules Criminal Case Against Bill Cosby Will Move Forward. 2) In the Flint, MI Water Crisis, new evidence that taking Flint off of the Detroit Water source was NOT a savings.  3) It has been revealed that the Gov. Snyder Administration learned about Legionnaires disease in March 2015 and not Jan. 2016 when they told the public.  4) A new report from the United Nations states that they are Extremely Concerned about the condition of African Americans in the U.S.  They are recommending that the U.S. give reparations to African Americans.


    DETROIT: FREE EVENT - "The History Of Black History Month, Cooperative Economics & Redistributing The Pain With Economic Boycotts", Presentation & Discussion with Michael Imhotep founder of The African History Network, host of The Michael Imhotep Show. Sat. Feb. 6th, 12pm-3pm, Sun. Feb. 7th, 2pm-5pm at Nandi's Knowledge Cafe, 12511 Woodward Ave., Highland Park MI. Visit www.AfricanHistoryNetwork.com for more information.

  • 01:48

    Kerry Davis - African Americans Aint African

    in Politics Progressive

    Kerry Davis, author of "African Americans Ain't African," joined "Human Rigths Demand and hosted a series of shows on the subject of Blacks as indigenous people of America. This is his debut episode. Please call 347.857.3293 to listen, or access the show from our archives at Blogtalkradio anytime, 24/7. See Davis on video at YouTube at https://youtu.be/LURMdeTsKyA also. Davis asserts that Blacks in the USA descended from people who lived in the area now called the United States many generations before the first Europeans arrived and did NOT arrive here on slave ships. You are invited to leave comments for Mr. Davis in the comment field at Blogtalkradio at "Human Rights Demand" channel, or contact him using the information on the tape. Thank you for listening to and sharing this tape.


    Black History Month begins January 1 and ends December 31, but we celebrate in February. Happy Black History Month 2016!


    "Power concedes nothing without a demand; it never has, and it never will." ~Frederick Douglass

  • 01:01

    Kingdom Work for Christ and Christ-Centered Wellness

    in Christianity

    This week, Host Emma Boa-Durgammah will be addressing how Kingdom Work for Christ relates to seeking Christ-Centered physical wellness along with Biblical Insight on this topic. Tune in to find out more. Next week, we will have the blessing of holding an interview with Alisha Washington, a phenomenal sister-in-Christ who has been practicing Christ-Centered wellness through her victory over multiple sclerosis (MS).


    Every week, the Kingdom Work for Christ Online Radio Show addresses the Christ Follower's Purpose in God and how to practically represent Christ every day. Previous shows provide examples of how Kingdom Work for Christ can happen in any environment including: gossip, grief, abortion, youth, resting, chronic illness, the workplace, near death experiences, disagreement, speaking in truth, sexuality, rebuilding after a storm, among others. To listen to previous shows visit www.kingdomworkforChrist.com/events


    Emma would love to hear from you through email after the show contact@kingdomworkforchrist.com. More on Emma can be found at www.kingdomworkforChrist.com or www.facebook.com/kingdomworkerforChrist. A very special thanks to Alyce Metallo for her arrangement of Blessed Assurance (My Story), our opening song! Check her out at www.alycemetallo.com.

  • 00:31

    WORLD WIDE AFRICA THE VOICE OF THE PAN AFRICAN MOVEMENT

    in Politics

    "Asa Philip Randolph was about ten when a group of solemn, angry men arrived at his Jacksonville, Florida, home one afternoon. They wanted to see his father, Reverend James William Randolph.  The reverend gathered the men in the family's sparse living room, and they told him what had happened.
    A black man had been locked up in the Duval County jail and angry white men were muttering about hanging him without a trial.  Such hangings,  known as lynchings, were terribly familiar to black people, particularly in the South.  But the city of Jacksonville had a tradition of African American pride; the black men gathered in Randolph house were not willing to tolerate lynching.  Guns packed, they were prepared to encircle the jail and greet the white mob with force. They wanted the reverend to join them.
    The Randolph's kept two guns in the house, a Bulldog pistol and a shotgun. James Randolph handed his wife the shotgun, took the Bulldog for himself and headed for the Jail. Elizabeth Randolph, a dead shot, kept the gun cradled across her lap for the rest of the night.  The Reverend returned home at dawn, exhausted but relieved.  When the lynch mob was confronted with the jail's armed defenders they wisely backed down."  A. PHILIP RANDOLPH and the AFRICAN AMERICAN LABOR MOVEMENT by Calvin Craig Miller. 

  • 03:56

    The Dangers of Negropean Parenting of Black-African Children

    in Politics

    The Dangers of Negropean Parenting Against Black Children (The dillemmas of Crackers-In-Blackface Parenting)


    Traumas of Black-African children, the Cracker-In-Blackface (Negropean) Parents; birthing & parenting Black children and the (multifaceted) racial psychoses as a result of it. 


    Dr. Alli Muhammad MS, PhD, MD:


    The Traumatic Black Obtrusive Negropean Parenting Disorder (AKA Cracker-In-Blackface Parenting Disorder); The Origins, Ingredients and Psychology of the Negropean Parenting birthing & parenting Black children and the (multifaceted) racial psychoses as a result of it. 


    Dr. Alli Muhammad CGIC-RBPP exposes the origings and ingredients of Negropean Parenting birthing & parenting Black children and the (multifaceted) racial psychoses as a result of it; the corollaries of the Traumatic Black African Holocaust Disorder as a result of the Black African Holocaust.


    Baba Osagyefo Olugbala Revolutionary Goon, General Dr. Alli Muhammad M.S., PhD, MD AKA "Super Nigga". Fights for us on many battlefields he is our BOLD REVOLUTIONARY BLACK POWER WARRIOR GENERAL. Dr. Alli Muhammad is the Chief-General-In-Command of the RBPP.


    The Revolutionary Black Panther Party – RADIO BROADCAST
    Tonight – Thursday – February 4, 2016 - 9:30 pm EST
    9:30PM Eastern | 8:30PM CDT| 7:30PM MDT| 6:30 PM Pacific
    TOPIC: The Dangers & Origins of the Negropean Parenting of  Black-African Children!
    The multifaceted racial psychoses as a result Cracker-In-Blackface (Negropean) Parenting
    (By Dr. Alli Muhammad - CGIC-RBPP)


    Call: 347-637-2773 To Listen In
    Online: www.blogtalkradio.com/revolutionaryblackpantherparty


     


     

  • 01:02

    African American Battered program

    in Family


    African American Battered program: discussion about things that are relevant to the community, with social context, connection gang violence and violence in the home, prison re entry, fatherhood, high stress low income community and violence

  • 00:45

    The Decoding Society

    in Politics

    The Brown Baggers riff on African Americans' infatuation with the Clintons and whether supporters of Bernie Sanders are naive. Also recap the results of the Iowa Caucus and the upcoming primary in New Hampshire.. 1:30p EST The call in number is 347-857-1436.

  • 00:31

    It Ain't History Unless you Recognize Me In It...

    in Radio

    Another year has come and we're faced again with the idea of celebrating the accomplishments of the African American community or better yet our ancestors from a not too distant past and for all their achievements we're going to try to sum it up in the course of a month and call it simply... Black history! Native Americans, African Americans, Latin Americans have all somehow been excluded from American history and today we want to ask a question how when this country was founded on the backs (almost literally) of these very people, but somehow they've all seem to have been forgotten inside of the American history in, and somehow they've all seem to have been forgotten for their contributions, for their charities, for their hard work, for their sacrifices, for their very lives given to build this country to where it is today. We'll address that in our segment: "It aint history unless you include this"!