• 00:30

    "Where Are They Now?" - Louisiana's Female Singers Of Color - 1960s To Present.

    in Entertainment

    Take A Journey With Us Tonight Throughout The State of Louisiana!


    Listen and reminence as the music flows like butter through your ears. Slippery, melancholy little notes that take you  away to another time and place. Listen... as it plays out from distant portals and doors of any city you visit.


    That's Louisiana!


    [ But, upon closer review anyone can see that the view is askew. ]


    Slanted towards almost certain oblivion of the female artist, and her legacy.


    At least, for those of ethnic backgrounds.


    We will explore a piece of Louisiana's 'omitted musical history' as we share the journey of a few who's footsteps opened then doors for women of color within the state.


    Join us....


    As We Get LIVE AFTER DARK!


    Your Hosts:  Betty Lewis & Diamond Ryan

  • 03:03

    Imam Yahya Shabazz & Imam Kareem Hamid

    in Religion

    Study Of Life After The Human Rights Movement Of The Decade Of The 1960s From A QURANIC Prespective. And Identifying ALLAH'S Purpose And Intent For The Creation,Insha ALLAH.

  • 02:12

    The Full Fledge Show with Jeri and Kay: Remember what happened, remember when?

    in Lifestyle

    Tonight at 6:30CST, 7:30EST, call in line is 347-826-9733. On this week's show, join Kay as she looks at the changes in morality in society since the early 1960s up to today. Kay invites you to join in on the conversation. Call in, tell her what changes you have seen, how it has effected you. This is YOUR chance to be heard. If you could pick a time to go back to in your life, when would that be and why? Open line night. Kay wants to hear from you.
    Jeri returns next week for a very special guest interview.

  • 00:53

    William David Spencer,Name in The Papers

    in Books

    Since early childhood, William David Spencer has been in love with books and, particularly with mysteries and adventure stories. Captivated as a small child by the ingenious tales of Joe Pooh, Teddy Bear Detective, spun out by his endlessly inventive older sister, the young boy was left bereft of sister and story at her untimely death when he was only six years old. Books, poems, music and lyrics were his solace and he has been deeply immersed in creating them ever since.
    Born and reared in urban central New Jersey, his life was changed by two events; his encounter with Jesus through Inter-Varsity Christian Fellowship after a thought-provoking hospitalization in the summer between his final year in high school and first year in college, due to cutting too much weight as co-captain of his high school wrestling team; and the impact of a riot in his birth city, Plainfield, N.J., during the racial upheavals in the late 1960s. The second event propelled him into a lifetime of urban ministry taking the healing message he’d learned from the first event to the streets of Plainfield, then to Newark, Philadelphia, back to Newark/New York/Jersey City, Trenton, Louisville, Kentucky, and today to Boston, where he trains ministers, as professor of theology and the arts, with Gordon-Conwell Theological Seminary’s Center for Urban Ministerial Education. Along the way he played in a band during the Jesus Movement, performing at coffee houses and festivals, helped establish a school for store front pastors, planted a storefront church he continues to co-pastor, helped create an academic journal and a book line and has had many adventures himself in city ministry.
     

  • 02:12

    Wanda's Picks Radio Show: State of Black Oakland 2015

    in Art

    This is a black arts and culture site. We will be exploring the African Diaspora via the writing, performance, both musical and theatrical (film and stage), as well as the visual arts of Africans in the Diaspora and those influenced by these aesthetic forms of expression. I am interested in the political and social ramifications of art on society, specifically movements supported by these artists and their forbearers. It is my claim that the artists are the true revolutionaries, their work honest and filled with raw unedited passion. They are our true heroes. Ashay!

    1. State of Black Oakland Organizers Noni Sessions and Turha Ak, join us to talk about the event, Saturday, March 28, 2015, 10-4 at Geoffrey's Inner Circle in Downtown Oakland.

    2. We close with an interview (part 1 of a series) with Mrs. Colia LaFayette Clark, Civil Rights Leader, Veteran Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) Organizer in Selma, Jackson and Montgomery in the early 1960s; Recipient of the Bridge-Crossing Jubilee Freedom Flame Award; Life-long Activist for Black Liberation and Social Justice. See http://www.teachingforchange.org/selma-bottom-up-history

  • 00:32

    COINTELPRO at the Mall

    in Politics

    Taking a page from the FBI’s COINTELPRO program of the 1960s, “intelligence analysts” from Mall of America in Bloomington, Minneapolis set up a fake Facebook account to identify and monitor local Black Lives Matter activists, who were later arrested and charged for a holiday protest at the mega mall.On December 11, as news of the planned Black Lives Matter protest began to spread, the “Nikki Larson” account was updated with a banner image of an (apocryphal) Martin Luther King Jr. quote: “Our lives begin to end the day we become silent about things that matter.” At some point, the Larson account “liked” the Black Lives Matter Minneapolis Facebook group.Metadata from some of the documents lists the software that created them as belonging to “Sam Root” at the “Mall of America.” A Facebook account for a Sam Root lists his profession as “Intelligence Analyst at Mall of America.”  The Intercept


     

  • 02:03

    Imam Yahya Shabazz &Karriem Hameed

    in Islam

    Study Of Life After The Human Rights Movement Of The Decade Of The 1960s From A QURANIC Prespective. And Identifying ALLAH'S Purpose And Intent For The Creation,Insha ALLAH.

  • 01:58

    sIgNoThEtImEs LISTEN IN SESSION Kwame Toure TURNING UNCONSCIOUS INTO CONSCIOUS

    in Motivation

    TONIGHT IS THE FINAL LISTEN-IN SESSION DURING THE 90 DAY BLACKOUT OF MAINSTREAM MEDIA Kwame Touré, once known as Stokely Carmichael (June 29, 1941 – November 15, 1998), was a Trinidadian-American activist active in the 1960s Civil Rights Movement, and later, the global Pan-African movement. Growing up in the United States from the age of eleven, he graduated from Howard University. He rose to prominence in the civil rights and Black Power movements, first as a leader of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC), later as the "Honorary Prime Minister" of the Black Panther Party, and finally as a leader of the All-African Peoples Revolutionary Party.

  • 01:30

    Teen Pregnancy

    in Social Networking

    Even though the teen pregnancy rate has declined over the past few decades, the fact of the matter is that the United States has the highest teen pregnancy rate of the Western industrialized world. It is true that the teen pregnancy and birth rate was much higher prior to 1980 (and especially in the 1950s and 1960s), but at the time young women were getting married and having children before the age of 20. Most of the teen pregnancies occurring before 1980 were to married women; now most of today's teen mothers are unwed.

  • 02:59

    Pan-African Journal: Special Worldwide Radio Broadcast

    in Politics

    Listen to this special broadcast of the Pan-African Journal hosted by Abayomi Azikiwe, editor of the Pan-African News Wire. We present our regular PANW reports on developments in Sierra Leone, Egypt, Ferguson and other issues. The second hour focuses on several artists during the 1960s in rare archival interviews on the African American national question including Rosa Parks, Dorothy Dandridge, James Baldwin, Lorraine Hansberry, Langston Hughes and others. In the final hour we focus on the political legacy of Coretta Scott King and how she continued the struggle led by her husband after his martyrdom in April 1968 until her death in 2006. 

  • 01:59

    Celebrity Link- Featuring the great Voice of Ernie Smith & The Band FAB5

    in Music

     


    Ernie Smith (born Glenroy Anthony Michael Archangelo Smith, May 1945, Kingston, Jamaica) is a reggae singer, with a deep baritone voice, who had his greatest success in the late 1960s and 1970s.


    Fab 5, formed in 1970, is Jamaica's pre eminent popular band, whether measured by record sales at home, hits on the charts, frequency of engagements or major awards won over the years.Their first recording, "Come Back And Stay", was number one in Jamaica, and in their first year on the road, and for the following two years, they won the only available awards, the Swing Awards for best band of 1971-72, 1972-73 and 1973-74. They also took the El Suzie Award as Joint Top Road and Dance Band for 1975-76 and the RJR Listeners' Award for Best Band in 1980.They backed Johnny Nash on all the reggae cuts comprising most of his platinum album "I Can See Clearly Now". Two singles from that album, "Guava Jelly" and "Stir It Up", established Bob Marley as a major songwriter on the international scene.Fab 5 have enjoyed an endless succession of hits in Jamaica and the "ethnic" markets of North America.In their early years such songs as "Chirpy Cheep", "Shaving Cream", "Oh, Dad" and "Love Me For A Reason", and their musicality and showmanship made Fab 5 the rage on the dance and show circuits.More recently, they have been kept on top by the likes of "Yu Safe", "Ring Road Jam", "Feeling Horny", "Computer Mad", "What The Police High Command Can Do", "Jamaican Woman", "Psalms", "All Night Party", "Mini", "Sweat", "Don't Wear None", "Freeze", "Good Buddy", "Mango" and their "Live" series.

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