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  • 01:59

    Military Monday With John D. Gresham and Zenith Press Author Phil Keith

    in History

    USS Lexington (CV 2), along with her sister ship, USS Saratoga (CV 3), were America's first real aircraft carriers, and genuine wonders of the world we were commissioned in the late 1920s. Converted from a pair of battlecruiser hulls made surplus by the Washington Naval Treaty, the two ships were the largest, most powerful, and fastest warships in the world. Able to carry and operate up to 90 aircraft, twice as many as any of the contemporary British and Japanese aircraft carriers, Lexington and her sister ship were the platforms where the U.S. Navy learned to take airpower out to sea. But Lexington was more than just a ship, for she also was a home and a schoolhouse for the men who served aboard her. As American's aircraft carrier fleet grew prior to World War II, Lexington and her sister were the ships where the men who would crew those new carriers learned their trades. In addition, some of the U.S. Navy's greatest leaders in World War II were captains aboard the Lexington, including Adm. Ernest J. King and Rear Adm. Forrest Sherman. And even though Lexington was lost at the Battle of the Coral Sea in May 1942, her loss taught critical damage control lessons that are still used today.


    To learn more about "Lady Lex," tune in at 1 PM EDT for Military Monday (#MilitaryMonday on the Writestream Radio Network (@Writestream)) hosted by author, historian, journalist and documentary filmmaker John D. Gresham (@greshamj01). John's guest this week is Zenith Press (@Zenith_Press) author Phil Keith, who has written a new book, STAY THE RISING SUN, chronicles the story of the Lexington to her sinking in the Coral Sea.

  • 01:55

    National Agenda with savage-el ~ Cahokia

    in Education

    A Thriving Ancient Metropolis
    According to archaeological finds, the city of Cahokia was inhabited from about A.D. 700 to 1400. At its peak, from A.D. 1050 to 1200, the city covered nearly six square miles and 10,000 to 20,000 people lived here. Over 120 mounds were built over time, and most of the mounds were enlarged several times. Houses were arranged in rows and around open plazas, and vast agricultural fields lay outside the city.


    The site is named for the Cahokia subtribe of the Illiniwek (or Illinois tribe, a loose confederacy of related peoples), who moved into the area in the 1600s. They were living nearby when the French arrived about 1699. Sometime in the mid-1800s, local historians suggested the site be called "Cahokia" to honor these later arrivals.


    Archaeological investigations and scientific tests, mostly since the 1920s and especially since the 1960s, have provided what is known of the once-thriving community.

  • 00:47

    Major League Baseball Historian, Author Harry Lockhart Jr.

    in Baseball

    Join Host Rich Gehlhausen and Author of The Beef, Harry Lockhart Jr. for an evening fireside chat around the campfire on baseball History. Harry's baseball expertise flows, giving listeners a preview into his next book and what baseball was like for some of the great players in the 50's - 60's.


    Marble Award Winner for Best Non-Fiction Book 2014; The Beef


    Amazon Info:



    Paperback: 152 pages
    Publisher: AuthorHouse (February 22, 2013)
    Language: English
    ISBN-10: 1481713248
    ISBN-13: 978-1481713245
    Product Dimensions: 6 x 0.4 x 9 inches


     Baseball, History, Baseball Facts


    The Beef


    Since Babe Ruth joined the New York Yankees in the 1920s, America has been intrigued with baseball sluggers and teams that stuff the middle of their batting order with power. Even today, sports fans flip to ESPN to see who hit the dingers of the day. Yes, we like to see great catches and outstanding pitching performances, but it’s the home runs we live for. The 1960s was a decade of some of the greatest slugging combinations in baseball history. From Maris and Mantle to McCovey and Mays, the decade’s memories will live forever!

  • 00:24

    Harlem Renaissance: The Shaping of An Identity and The Nation

    in Women

    During the first half of the 20th century, the largest internal population shift in U.S. history took place. Starting about 1910, through the Great Migration over five million African Americans made choices and "voted with their feet" by moving from the South to northern cities, the West and Midwest. In the 1920s, the concentration of blacks in New York led to the cultural movement known as the Harlem Renaissance, whose influence reached nationwide.  From A. Philip Randolph to Marcus Garvey, sociopolitical designs for self-determination became the model that pushed towards sociopoliticah shifts within the American construct.  


    How did these extraordinary people develop and sustain such constructs?  Are they relevant during current times?  Join us as we talk about how the Harlem Renaissance shaped identity for black American and the nation.


    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/African-American_history#The_Great_Migration_and_the_Harlem_Renaissance, accessed 2/20/15.

  • 02:00

    P.O.P.S MOVEMENT PRESENTS TEEN TALK TUESDAY

    in Education

    TONIGHT WE WILL BE RELIVING THE LEGACY OF THE NEW NEGRO MOVEMENT HARLEM RENAISSANCE PLEACE JOIN US AS WE GO INTO THE SIX STEPS TO PEACE TONIGHT ON POPS MOVEMENT CHIME IN TONIGHT AT 7:30 EST 6:30 CENTRAL CALL IN NUMBER IS 713-955-0708


    Spanning the 1920s to the mid-1930s, the Harlem Renaissance was a literary, artistic, and intellectual movement that kindled a new black cultural identity. Its essence was summed up by critic and teacher Alain Locke in 1926 when he declared that through art, “Negro life is seizing its first chances for group expression and self determination.” Harlem became the center of a “spiritual coming of age” in which Locke’s “New Negro” transformed “social disillusionment to race pride.” Chiefly literary, the Renaissance included the visual arts but excluded jazz, despite its parallel emergence as a black art form.

  • 00:46

    Superbowl Sunday; the secret horse deal of Ibn Saud & the Americans

    in Islam

    We will briefly dicuss the Superbowl Highlights.


    The Saudis have a rich and interesting history and have been able to sustain a brotherly reign over 3-4 generations.  Find out how real gold generated into black gold made the Saudi's one of the most wealthy in the world.  The first kingdom leader only wanted 500 horses in exchange for a land grant to explore minerals in the mid 1920s.  Learn how the Saudis have had to ride the fence on Arab vs. Western interests.  Bob gives a rich explanation of Saudi history.


    Also, is Katy Perry a sellout or just an all American girl?

  • 00:34

    The Liberal Cosmos Is Cracking Up

    in Current Events

    The terrible murders at the Charlie Hebdo offices in Paris sent a tremor though the civilized world.  They undermine the narrative that the war on terror is some bizarre invention perpetrated by the Bush Administration, a favorite lefty narrative.  Liberalism may never be the same.  Tonight we explore some core concepts underlying the progressive view of the world. 


     


     

  • 02:26

    The Smoking Glass Hour with Baron Glass

    in Social Networking

    Oklahoma Hoodie Law & An Amazing Story of Success


    Guest Line Up


    7:30 PM CST - A 1920s Oklahoma law that was once meant to combat the Klu-Klux-Klan may now be amended to make it illegal to wear a hoodie in the state. Under the new proposal a person could be fined up to $500 for sporting a hoodie....tune in to hear more.   


    8:30 PM CST - Cindy Tawian - Ms. Tawian was a victim of molestation. She tells how she overcame the hurdle and now has a successful business with a hair care product line...tune in to hear more.

  • 00:18

    Christmas Eve in Kent Texas

    in History

    My buddy Bob Mc Glew suggested a story line that was visit a ghost town and to do a short story about what you find there. So has we were traveling to Austin Texas on December 24  we stopped in Kent Texas just to see what was there and do a share some reflections . There is not much there but I did learn some valuable lessons. (1) the batteries in my digital camera fell out and promptly disappeared, (2) we were not sure what we would find but do the research first This show is dedicated to Robert Mc Glew my S3 productions foreign reporter for giving me the idea


    COMMENTS: Kent. A ranch town born to supply the needs of the long x Cattle Company. The most famous of the west Texas ranches. Owned by the Reynolds brothers, prominent west Texas ranchers. Their holding consisted of several thousand acres extending from north of us highway 10 to several miles south into the Davis mountains. REMAINS: Lots of ruins but a lot still standing. http://www.ghosttowns.com/states/tx/kent.html


    The town, once called Antelope, was founded in the early 1890s.

    A post office was granted in 1893 and by 1914 the population was a thriving 25 persons. The population doubled in the mid-1920s and remained at that level for 40 years. The post office was reported closed in 1960 but has since reopened.

    Kent had a population of sixty-five in the late 1960s - falling to 60 by the mid-1970s where it remains today.

    Today little is left to interest a tourist - but the juncture of the two roads provides a sense of place. The lone telephone at least looks comforting but its condition is unknown. The overpass of I-10 offers some relief from the scorching sun but it will be sometime before Kent becomes a destination.


    http://www.texasescapes.com/WestTexasTowns/KentTexas/KentTexas.htm


    A special thank you to Excutive INN Best Western Round Rock for their help

  • 01:23

    White Women of the Harlem Renaissance w/ Author Carla Kaplan

    in Culture

    Amy Beth welcomes distinguished American Literature professor Carla Kaplan, author of the acclaimed Miss Anne in Harlem: The White Women of the Black Renaissance. We discuss her search for the story of Miss Anne- a collective term applied to white women who poured into Harlem during the 1920s- and their impact on the lively and culturally important Jazz Age.


    And Holiday hoopla, free flow Pop Culture convo, Inspiration to Action shout-outs, humor, music and more!


    Tweet before/during show @abwrites 


    Call during the show 347-857-4505 


    Join us LIVE or later on demand! 


     

  • 00:37

    It's Classic Monday! Today we will listen to Aimee Semple McPherson

    in Christianity

    From Wikipedia:


    Aimee Semple McPherson (October 9, 1890 – September 27, 1944), also known as Sister Aimee, was a Canadian-American Los Angeles–based evangelist and media celebrity in the 1920s and 1930s. She founded the Foursquare Church. McPherson has been noted as a pioneer in the use of modern media, especially radio, and was the second woman to be granted a broadcast license. She used radio to draw on the growing appeal of popular entertainment in North America and incorporated other forms into her weekly sermons at Angelus Temple.