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  • Rex Sikes Movie Beat chats with actor Clint Howard

    in Film

    Clint Howard, actor, has a career spanning over fifty years,and over two hundred film and TV shows.  He has spent his entire life entertaining us in a variety of interesting and unique roles. From childhood roles in The Andy Griffith Show and Star Trek to of course, the hit TV Show Gentle Ben, Clint was a well recognized personality by the time he was ten.Making the transition from juvenile to adult actor was no problem for Clint. Cult classic Rock N Roll High School and horror genre Evilspeak showed as an adult he could be versatile and affective. Whether Clint works in comedy classics like Waterboy, the Austin Powers film series or a hilarious episode of Seinfeld, he comfortably slides into dramatic roles such as Apollo 13, Frost/Nixon and Alabama Moon. Recently, Clint can be seen in the campy, B Horror title, Bloodrayne Third Reich and Rob Zombie's Lords of Salem. He's also put on the producing hat, teaming with long time colleague Gavin Grazer on an indie comedy. Born and raised in Burbank, California, Clint has always balanced his professional career with a 'hometown' oriented life. He continues to live with his wife Melanie in Burbank and stay active in the community. Stay tuned to Rex Sikes Movie Beat for other great archived interviews, cast and crew listings, events, festivals, premieres, and more at rexsikes.com

  • 00:31

    It’s the End of the World? Let’s Go to Mars!

    in Education

    Hosts Phil Bowermaster and Stephen Gordon discuss why the end may be near. is it time to book passage to Mars?


    How virtual reality can save humanity


    Truc de Ouf's Gentry Lane says society is losing its humanity, but a powerful storytelling tool like VR can help revive it.


    Panarchy 101, or How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love Global Collapse


    Like air moving from one balloon into another, the collapse of an archaic system actively drives the emergence of a new system. 


    How to Solve a Mass Extinction Event


    Human Extinction Isn't That Unlikely
    “A typical person is more than five times as likely to die in an extinction event as in a car crash,” says a new report


    SpaceX may have just changed the world with a tweet.


    It began with a Tweet. On Wednesday, April 27, SpaceX posted two photos on Twitter, announcing plans to send a Red Dragon space capsule to Mars "as soon as 2018."


    Terraforming Mars: Turning the Red Planet Green 


    Join us


    WT 158-464

  • 02:02

    WORLD WIDE AFRICA THE VOICE OF THE PAN AFRICAN MOVEMENT

    in Politics

     


    Tonight we continue with chapter 2 of MALCOLM X THE MAN AND HIS TIMES, The Myths about Malcolm X.


    "We have a great tendency to turn our leaders over to somebody else.  Who is the custodian of Malcolm’s tradition? Who is the custodian? But we aren’t acting like it.  You know who the custodian is, don’t you?  —there he sits, right there. If Mr. Breitman stopped writing, nobody would write anything.  And he’s doing it in terms of what he believes is a proper interpretation.  If we want to preserve our heroes, we have to become the custodians of that tradition.  Who is the custodian of DuBois?  Black people? No, we don’t have one thing that he wrote.  The Communist Party has it, and they will let us read what they want us to read.  

  • 01:29

    Diamond's World Presents JL Sapphire

    in Books

    Join me as I talk to Author JL Sapphire about her literary journey and catalog.

  • 01:58

    WORLD WIDE AFRICA THE VOICE OF THE PAN AFRICAN MOVEMENT

    in Politics

    Tonight we will continue our book on Malcolm X THE MAN AND HIS TIMES, edited by Dr. John Henrik Clarke. Essay number two is wiritten by a fellow clergyman.  "Certainly Brother Malcolm wanted to relate our struggle, the struggle of black people in America, to the struggle of black people everywhere.  I say to the struggle of black people everywhere, because that is a struggle that he understood, that I understand, and that you understand.,   I am not talking about relating it to the struggle of oppressed people everywhere, but relating it to the struggle of BLACK people everywhere.  But he expected little help from the Africans and the African nations.  Malcolm wasn’t running around Africa thinking that the African nations were going to free us.  Malcolm wasn’t that kind of an idiotic idealist.  He went to our black brothers because they were our bothers.  He talked to them about our problems, and we are as concerned about their problems as we want them to be about our problems.  But he didn’t go to Africa expecting them to free us. Sometimes we forget that, and we sit around waiting for somebody in Africa to send somebody over here to free us— “like Malcolm said they were going to.”  He never said it and they were never going to do it.  If you are going to be free, you are going to free yourself, and that is what Malcolm told us.  The African nations can’t free us, they can’t save us.  They couldn’t even sabe Lumumba in Africa, they couldn’t save the black people of Rhodesia; they couldn’t free black people of South Africa. The why should we sit here in our own brutality, waiting for some mysterious transformation when back armies from Africa are coming over here and free us?  They could use some black armies from over here to free them." Myths about Malcolm X by Reverand Albert Cleage Feb. 24, 1967

  • 01:11

    Her Dork World / His Dork World Talks MORE ECW 1997!

    in Entertainment

    Her Dork World / His Dork World talked about the 6/30/97 & 7/7/97 episodes of ECW, featuring matches from Bam Bam Bigelow, Chris Candido, Dr. Tom Pritchard, Taz, RVD, Sabu, Sandman, & more!  The 6-30 show was also the infamous night that Jim Cornette showed up in the ECW Arena!  We are barreling headlong toward Hardcore Heaven 1997 as we stay hardcore in the 90's!!!  We also sneak in a little hockey talk at the start of the show.

  • 00:13

    Finding Freedom in an Unfree World

    in Health

    Author and lecturer Roland Trujillo talks about how past traumas chain us to the past, and more importantly how to get free from baggage from the past

  • 01:15

    It's A Kentucky Basketball Recruiting World

    in Basketball

    Will put the subject matter up on tuesday of next week. Call 516-595-8069.

  • 01:31

    Life is just Music that's why our heart has a Beat

    in LGBT

    Life for some people can be merely white noise and for some it can be the greatest orchestra ever conducted. It's when your life is stuck on search that eventually you get done trying and get to the point your just pick a tune or a station. The only bad thing is life keeps going but are you gonna be stuck in that one song forever

  • 01:55

    Underground Beat with Madam President #Take9

    in Hip Hop Music

    On this Underground Beat with Madam President will be throwing down all those raw hip-hop tracks you’ve come to expect from the Underground Beat, while she reviews some new material, gives some older material another spin, of course she’ll have those announcements on deck so that everyone will know what’s going on around them, and other than that, remember YOU can tune in from 8-10pm est. If YOU want to call in and speak with Madam President the number is (646)716-5926 and just press 1 to connect with her. As always #PresidentialSalute to all the listeners, callers, supporters, former co-host, and former guest speakers we greatly appreciate YOU!

  • 01:59

    WORLD WIDE ARRICA THE VOICE OF THE PAN AFRICAN MOVEMENT

    in Politics

    MYTHS ABOUT MALCOLM X by, Reverend Albert Cleave
    SPEECH DELIVERED IN DETROIT FEBRUARY 24, 1967


    "I am not a Marxist  I don't pretend to be, I don't even preTend to know anything about it. I am a black man in a world dominated by white oppression, and that is my total philosophy.  I would like to get rid of that impression, and that is my total objective.  Son I bring to this occasion rather a simple approach personal reflections on the significance of Malcolm X.
    I can remember a number of occasions when I talked to him, when I was with him, when I was with him, when I spoke on platforms with him; and so I am not indebted to printed material for my impression of Malcolm X .  I remember the last time he was in the city --not so much the speech, which was not one of his best by any means; it reflected, I think, much of the tension that he was under so much pressure .t
    Hat he was under, much of the confusion, the constant living on the brink of violence.  But I can remember him backstage, in the Gold room, I think they call it, of Ford Auditorium. Recently he had suffered smoke inhalation, the doctor had given him an injection, when trying to sleep, he was irritable.  But he was there because he had promised to be there, because he thought some people were concerned about what he had to say."