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  • 00:42

    The Vicksburg Campaign And The Importance Of The Railroad

    in Hobbies

    During our Mississippi swing, we stopped off and discovered that the Vicksburg National Military Park had a railroad running through it, and has since before the war.  So I asked the National Park staff if we could do a follow up inerview. What I learned was amazing, just as the spot in the park that overlooked the railroad. Join us for this week's program.

  • 01:59

    LTT On The Road: Monticello Railroad Museum

    in Hobbies

    Let's Talk Trains visits Monticellp Railroad Museum. Learn about the history, the future and the current restorations going on. 

  • 01:00

    Traveling the Underground Railroad from Virginia to Ontario

    in Travel

    We'll share stories about some of the Underground Railroad and a Destination Spotlight will shine on the Faukland Islands and Romania.


    The City of Norfolk, Virginia is an important 400-year-old port city and home to the largest naval base in the world.  But, surprisingly as a southern mid-Atlantic city, Norfolk also played a crucial role in the Underground Railroad as one of the last port stops on the road to freedom north.  Much of this history is now being shared through Norfolk's self-guided Waterways to Freedom Tour that our guest, Dr. Cassandra Newby-Alexander from Norfolk State University helped to create.


    Historian and author Debra Sandoe McCauslin has deep roots in Gettysburg and Adams County, Pennsylvania.  We learned about her family history and, in our car ride with her along the Underground Railroad, Debra brought to life the voices of some fugitive slaves and the Quakers who helped them.


    Lewiston, New York was the final stop for runaway slaves from the South who sought to cross the border into Canada to freedom.  Once slaves reached Lewiston, locals helped them cross the Niagara River by boat or by foot when the river was frozen. 


    After the War of 1812, Canada's reputation as a safe haven for fugitive slaves grew because of the development of settlements like the Southern Ontario farming community of Buxton, formerly the Elgin Settlement.  Buxton was one of four planned settlements for former and runaway slaves and its founder, Reverend William King, a white man, fought other white settlers to establish the area. 

  • 02:08

    Art Unity Network & Underground Railroad Museum

    in Art

    347-989-8767 Saturday 1pm PT 4 ET.


    Join Blackistand Radio as we speak to Chrystal Tucker about her Art Unity Network. All forms of artists are encouraged to join us as we push conscious art forms in this revolutionary Renaissance of spiritual warefare. Also we will explore the Underground Railroad Mesuem restoration efforts of Kansas city.


    Special guest and Hip Hop artist King Free Man will also be joining us sharing his dope tracks and vision.


    Tune in and drop some jewels of your own!

  • 02:01

    LTT On The Road: McComb Mississippi Railroad Museum

    in Hobbies

    On this episode, we head south for our annual Mississippi visit. This time, we pull into McComb, Mississippi. The town of McComb is home to the McComb Railroad Museum. The town owes it's beginnings to the railroads, as do many of Mississippi towns. The McComb Railroad Museum is housed in the current Amtrak Station and has a vast collection of railroad artifacts and some rolling stock.


    We visit with McComb's vice-mayor, about what the railroad and the railroad museum currently means to the area. We will also find out how he personally supports the museum. Then we visit with the museum's director, Winnie Howell. Ms. Howell will educate us on why she decided to save the depot and the town's railroad history. Several of the museum's volunteers will stop by to tell us what resoration projects they are working on. 


    Amtrak's Area Station Manager will closeout the episode to talk the role Amtrak plays in the town.


     


    Join us for a information packed show. 

  • 00:33

    A Quick Visit To The Chatham, Illinois Railroad Museum

    in Hobbies

    If you have ever traveled through the Springfield, Illinois area recently, you probably missed a great little railroad museum, just south of Springfield. The town of Chatham, Illinois has preserved their Chicago and Alton depot. The depot sits next to the Amtrak/UP line that runs from Chicago to St. Louis. The line is getting an upgrade to 110 mph for the higher speed program. 


    The museum is a great example of what can be done, when like minded people come together and preserve history.


     

  • 01:20

    Underground Railroad (Social Capital) Millionaires - (Law Clinic)

    in Real Estate

    Today on "It's My House" we shall be making people aware of the "Underground Railroad Millionaires". The (3) we shall speak on today are:



    Melvin Dempsey.........Founder of Dempsey, Alaska
    Mary Ellen Pleasant......Former slave who became a multi-millionaire.
    Keish...........Discovered gold that led to a gold rush.


    Feel free to call in with any questions, comments, or suggestions that you might have.


    Thankyou for visiting our website @: www.itsmyhouseonline.com


    Call to listen to "It's My House Radio" by dialing 712-432-8863.


    Thank you for listening to our podcast and please listen often.

  • 00:03

    Railroad Talk

    in Dreams

    Train

  • 01:01

    Gettysburg's underground railroad trail

    in Travel

    World Footprints is pleased share this GOLD Award winning show which was recognized by the North American Travel Journalist Association.   In celebration of Black History Month and the 150 Anniversary Commemoration of the American Civil War and Gettysburg Address, you will see a very compelling side of Gettysburg as told through our guests.  In 2013 the city of Gettysburg, the nation and the world reflected upon the Battle of Gettysburg, which took place from July 1 to July 3 1863, and President Abraham Lincoln's Gettysburg Address on November 19, 1863.  We showcased what visitors can expect to see and experience following the Commemorations and beyond the battlefield with Stacey Fox, Vice President of Marketing and Sales of the Gettysburg Convention & Visitors Bureau. Then, Scott Hancock, PhD, Associate Professor of History and Africana Studies at Gettysburg College joins us to discuss the role of the Underground Railroad in the war, the African-American struggle for freedom--from President Abraham Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address to Martin Luther King, Jr.’s “I Have a Dream” speech, and the seminal events that took place in Gettysburg in 1863 that forever changed America. Finally, Debra Sandoe McCauslin of For the Cause/Gettysburg Histories takes us along the Underground Railroad in Adams County, Pennsylvania where we visit Yellow Hill and the Quaker Valley to uncover the African-American families who settled in the area and the role of Quakers in the Abolitionist Movement there.

  • 02:00

    Respondek Railroad President Terry Respondek Visits With ShuttletrainTED

    in Hobbies

    Terry Respondek describes how he built his Shortline Railroads from one engine. Terry also details why he decided to become a railroad executive. Call in and ask him questions. The call in number is 646-716-7106.

  • 02:12

    Harriet Tubman and Quakers = Underground Railroad

    in Politics Conservative

    Tubman's organizing ability was key to her success -- she had to work with supporters on the clandestine Underground Railroad, as well as get messages to the slaves, since she met them away from their plantations to avoid detection. They usually left on a Saturday evening, as the Sabbath might delay anyone noticing their absence for another day, and if anyone did note their flight, the Sabbath would certainly delay anyone from organizing an effective pursuit or publishing a reward.


    Tubman was only about five feet tall, but she was smart and she was strong -- and she carried a long rifle. She used the rifle not only to intimidate pro-slavery people they might meet, but also to keep any of the slaves from backing out. She threatened any who seemed like they were about to leave, telling them that "dead Negroes tell no tales." A slave who returned from one of these trips could betray too many secrets: who had helped, what paths the flight had taken, how messages were passed..


    Quakers Released Slaves


     


    Not only did many Quakers release their slaves, but they saw to it that they could take care of themselves, teaching them to read and write and, in many cases, seeing that they were escorted to states or territories where they could live in freedom.


     


    Quaker John Woolman was involved with the abolitionist movement from an early date. He traveled the countryside, preaching against slavery. Woolman, born in 1720, became convinced that slavery was wrong when, at the age 20, he was asked by his employer to write a bill of sale for a slave girl. He did write it, but told his boss that he “believed slave-keeping to be a practice inconsistent with the Christian religion.” Shortly after this incident, Woodman left his job to travel and was instrumental in spreading the abolitionist message.