• 01:23

    Military Monday with John D. Gresham and Author Robert Shenk

    in Military

    It is a sad truth that most Americans have little or no idea of where the Black Sea region is, much less which countries are located there. Notwithstanding the failure of American schools to teach world geography, the Black Sea region is rarely visited by Westerners. It nevertheless remains one of the most politically important and strategically significant places on Earth. The Black Sea is literally the divide between the Christian and Muslim religions in Eurasia, and is bordered by some of the most volatile countries in the world today. In fact, American military forces have only rarely operated in the region, and then mostly within the borders of our NATO ally, Turkey. There was however an exception to this, just after World War I, when for a few years America operated a squadron of the U.S. Navy warships in the Black Sea. The story of their operations during that few years is a tale that is both compelling and informative, mixing elements of an Agatha Christie novel with the adventures of C. S. Forrester's Horatio Hornblower. And with the region presently at the top of the daily news, it makes sense to look at the American Black Sea experience in the 1920s.


    To learn more about the American Black Sea Squadron and it's experiences, join military historian, author and journalist John D. Gresham (@greshamj01) for Military Monday at 1 p.m. Eastern.His guest this week is U.S. Naval Institute Press (@USNIPress) author and historian Robert Shenk, whose book America's Black Sea Fleet tells the story of this rather unique chapter in American naval history. They will also talk about the unique features, qualities, and cultures in the region during the 1920s, and also provide some insights into what operating in the Black Sea today may be like. Listeners are in encouraged to call in and offer questions to both gentlemen, in what will surely be a highly topical and relevant show.

  • 00:31

    Women’s History Month: Perspective on Women over the last 50+ Years

    in Self Help

    If women forget the real importance of how far they have come, they will regress!


    If women today focus on the petty points, and forget the primary ones, we will ultimately and rightfully be considered inept and ignorant.


    Petty points are incidental. Primary points are essential and enduring … the ones that will affect women 50 years from now!


    The heart of the women’s movement was the underlying concept that women, as citizens, professionals, athletes and soldiers, were as valuable as men, and that was in the best interest of America.


    The women’s movement today seems to revolve around abortion rights birth control pills. But its roots and purpose meant so much more to America in general and women in particular. From the right to vote to the right to work to the right to privacy, the cultural and legal battle wages on, but many of the real soldiers never got the headlines.


    In 1962, Norma became the first woman enrolled in the prestigious Hornblower & Weeks stockbroker training program; and as a trainee she demanded and got equal pay, and joined her fellow trainees as the first woman to walk the floor of the NYSE. After training Norma worked as a licensed broker at Hornblower & Weeks, and was the only women on their Management Advisory Board. Her success led her to Bear Stearns & Co., and then Drexel Burnham Lambert, Inc.


    Moving to California, Norma soon opened her own firm, initiated a mutual fund, started a second firm and lectured throughout the United States to give advice to women starting on careers and investing. And she did all of this while raising five children,
    Norma sold her firm in 1998, retired with Larry, and traveled the world.


    Now age 83, Norma has a written her first book Breaking Down the Walls for more information visit http://healyourselftalk.com/womens-history-month/

  • 01:00

    Women's History Month: A Perspective on Women Over the Last 50+ Years

    in Lifestyle

    March is Women's History Month: a time for celebrating women of character, courage, and commitment. So we have the perfect guest for you! Norma Yaeger, age 83, long considered to be "feisty and funny" is also the first woman to ever walk the floor of the NYSE. We'll be talking with her about the opportunities women have now that did not exist for them in the 1960s.


    Coming of age in New York in the mid 20th century, when even educated women were expected to marry, have children and keep house, Norma bucked the trends and went to Bernard Baruch College and the NY Institute of Finance. She then did what was expected of women then: she got married, had children and deferred to her husband, when he failed to provide, she not only stepped-up but she stepped out and became a stockbroker.


    Norma reminds us at the heart of the women’s movement is the underlying concept that women, as citizens, professionals, athletes and soldiers, were as valuable as men. The Women’s Movement today seems to revolve around abortion rights and birth control pills. But she reminds us that its roots meant much more to America. From the right to vote, to the right to work, to the right to privacy, the cultural and legal battles continue now even in the 21st Century.


    In 1962, Norma became the first woman enrolled in the prestigious Hornblower & Weeks stockbroker training program; and as a trainee she demanded and got equal pay and was hired as a licensed broker at Hornblower & Weeks as the only woman on their Management Advisory Board. Upon moving to California, Norma soon opened her own firm and began lecturing throughout the United States giving advice to women starting careers and investing. She did all of this while raising five children. Norma has a written her first book "Breaking Down the Walls," available at Amazon and Barnes and Noble. www.NormaYaeger.com

  • 01:18

    Military Monday with John D. Gresham and Author Robert Shenk

    in Military

    It is a sad truth that most Americans have little or no idea of where the Black Sea region is, much less which countries are located there. Notwithstanding the failure of American schools to teach world geography, the Black Sea region is rarely visited by Westerners. It nevertheless remains one of the most politically important and strategically significant places on Earth. The Black Sea is literally the divide between the Christian and Muslim religions in Eurasia, and is bordered by some of the most volatile countries in the world today. In fact, American military forces have only rarely operated in the region, and then mostly within the borders of our NATO ally, Turkey. There was however an exception to this, just after World War I, when for a few years America operated a squadron of the U.S. Navy warships in the Black Sea. The story of their operations during that few years is a tale that is both compelling and informative, mixing elements of an Agatha Christie novel with the adventures of C. S. Forrester's Horatio Hornblower. And with the region presently at the top of the daily news, it makes sense to look at the American Black Sea experience in the 1920s.


    To learn more about the American Black Sea Squadron and it's experiences, join military historian, author and journalist John D. Gresham (@greshamj01) for Military Monday at 1 p.m. Eastern.His guest this week is U.S. Naval Institute Press (@USNIPress) author and historian Robert Shenk, whose book America's Black Sea Fleet tells the story of this rather unique chapter in American naval history. They will also talk about the unique features, qualities, and cultures in the region during the 1920s, and also provide some insights into what operating in the Black Sea today may be like. Listeners are in encouraged to call in and offer questions to both gentlemen, in what will surely be a highly topical and relevant show.

  • 00:32

    A Conversation with Norma Yaeger Retired Business Pioneer

    in Lifestyle

    The heart of the women’s movement was the underlying concept that women, as citizens, professionals, athletes and soldiers, were as valuable as men, and that was in the best interest of America


    The women’s movement roots and purpose meant so much more to America in general and women in particular.  From the right to vote to the right to work to the right to privacy, the cultural and legal battle wages on, but many of the real soldiers never got the headlines.


    Norma Yaeger, came of age in New York the mid 20th century when even educated women were expected to marry, have children and keep house.  So Norma went to Bernard Baruch College and the NY Institute of Finance and then she got married, had children and deferred to her husband. When he failed to provide, she not only stepped-up, she stepped out, and became a stockbroker.


    In 1962, Norma became the first woman enrolled in the prestigious Hornblower & Weeks stockbroker training program; and as a trainee she demanded and got equal pay, and joined her fellow trainees as the first woman to walk the floor of the NYSE. After training Norma worked as a licensed broker at Hornblower & Weeks, and was the only women on their Management Advisory Board.  Her success led her to Bear Stearns & Co., and then Drexel Burnham Lambert, Inc


    Moving to California, Norma soon opened her own firm, initiated a mutual fund, started a second firm and lectured throughout the United States to give advice to women starting on careers and investing.  And she did all of this while raising five children,


    Norma sold her firm in 1998, retired with Larry, and traveled the world. Now age 83, Norma has  written her first book Breaking Down the Walls


     


     

  • 00:32

    The Real Women’s Movement- The Personal Strength to be First

    in Motivation

    The heart of the women’s movement was the underlying concept that women, as citizens, professionals, athletes and soldiers, were as valuable as men, and that was in the best interest of America.
    The women’s movement today seems to revolve around abortion rights birth control pills. But its roots and purpose meant so much more to America in general and women in particular. From the right to vote to the right to work to the right to privacy, the cultural and legal battle wages on, but many of the real soldiers never got the headlines.
    Norma Yaeger, came of age in New York the mid 20th century when even educated women were expected to marry, have children and keep house. So Norma went to Bernard Baruch College and the NY Institute of Finance and then she got married, had children and deferred to her husband. When he failed to provide, she not only stepped-up, she stepped out, and became a stockbroker.
    In 1962, Norma became the first woman enrolled in the prestigious Hornblower & Weeks stockbroker training program; and as a trainee she demanded and got equal pay, and joined her fellow trainees as the first woman to walk the floor of the NYSE. 
    Now age 83, Norma has a written her first book Breaking Down the Walls, available for pre-sales at Amazon and Barnes and Noble. 

  • 01:32

    May the 4th Be With George Lucas' Marketing Dept!

    in Entertainment

    Nathaniel Hornblower goes silent AKA the tragic loss of Adam Yauch from The Beastie Boys.  Tragedy strikes down another prominent member of NFL's elite.  Rays home cooking places them atop the MLB standings.  NHL playoffs have fans staying up way past their bedtime.  Do you know someone that's swallowed a peanut?  We've got the cure!  All that and much more on this week's show.

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