• 00:49

    Genealogist, Gist family, African Am., Native Am , White Abolitionist

    in Culture

    Peter Gist Still the long lost enslaved brother of the Father of The Underground Railroad,  William Still. After 40 years Peter is reunited with his mother Charity Still!


    Samuel Gist was a resident of Great Britain and Virginia. In his will, Gist insisted his daughter free all the slaves she owned on the Gould Hill Plantation in Virginia. She complied and establish 6 free Gist Settlements throughout Ohio. Many of the descendants of the enslaved Gist settlers still live on the settlement.


    Samuel Gist was orphaned.  In 1739,  he was shipped to Virginia where he was indentured. 


    Sequoyah (George Gist) created the Cherokee alphabet, the syllabary.


    Secessionist South Carolina Governor – William Henry Gist, 1858-1860 The first to secede


     

  • 01:55

    Chief Langley - Metaphysical Approach to Removing Genealogical Brick Walls

    in Education

    Ancestoral Roadbocks and Brickwalls,  Things you refuse to think about.  Renewing your research. Opening the backdoor. What was I thinking?  The simple things we ignore.  Why did i do that?   Right before your eyes.  In the mist of a genealogical blessing.  The ancestor I never knew.  Beware of the signs.   Will I see moma again?  Leaning on faith?  Your ancestral belief system.  I dont know where to turn.  What can i do?   Stuck in a nutt.   In the middle of the road.   I cant turn back now.   I am almost there. This is it.  O my I knew i should hav tried that.   The search is over and on to the next.  One ancestor at a time.  Knowning who you are.  

  • 01:09

    Mocavo with Michael Leclerc

    in History

    Note: a dropped call in the middle of the show, but we were up and running again quickly.


    Michael Leclerc, chief genealogist at Mocavo, joins Jane this morning to talk about Mocavo, the genealogy search engine. Find out how Mocavo works as a search engine, what types of records can be found in its database, how it is different from other databases, and what each subscription tier provides a subscriber.


    https://www.mocavo.com/


    support@mocavo.com


     

  • 01:02

    Chief Langley Speaks Healing lies within you- "Honoring The Ancestors"

    in Education

    Forensic Genealogist and Uchean Tribal Historian breaks down  Native Slavery and the One Drop Blood Rule. Growning up with his Uchean Ancestors.  Discuss Burial Practices,  Hunting and Fishing traditions. Herbal healing.  Love is medication. Having faith in the Unknown and Unseen. Believing in yourself.  Walking with the Ancestors. 

  • 01:01

    Cherokee Genealogist Twila Barnes Discusses Fake Indian Elizabeth Warren

    in Politics

    Join Joe Dunn and Special Guest Cherokee Genealogist Twila Barnes for an hour discussion of Twila's Barnes' research into Senator Elizabeth Warren's ancestry claims.  Twila Barnes researched Elizabeth Warren during the 2012 MA Senate Race and debunked Elizabeth Warren's claims.  In Warren's new book, "A Fighting Chance," she writes that she was "hurt" and "angry" that people challenged her claims, for which, to this day, there is no evidence.  Twila Barnes can be found online at pollysgranddaughter.com, and on Twitter @pollysgdaughter.  You can listen on your phone or call in with your questions or comments simply by dialing (347) 826-9184, or listen online during the live broadcast and ON DEMAND 24/7.

  • 00:59

    Ireland and the Slave Trade with Maurice Gleeson, MD

    in History

    What role did the Irish play in the Transatlantic slave trade? Were the Irish ever enslaved or slave owners?


    Join my special guest, Dr. Maurice Gleeson for a compelling overview of Ireland and the Slave Trade.


    Dr. Maurice Gleeson is a psychiatrist from Dublin who works in London as a pharmaceutical physician. He is an avid genealogist and has traced his Irish family tree back to about 1800 on half of his ancestral lines. Using DNA, he was able to get back into the 1600's on one line, and this inspired his interest in Ireland's involvement with the Transatlantic Slave Trade.

  • 01:02

    What's New In Technology for Genealogist, Thomas MacEntee

    in History

    As a genealogist specializing in the use of technology and social media to improve genealogical research and to interact with others in the family history community, Thomas MacEntee relies upon his 25 years of experience in the information technology field.


    Thomas now shares his knowledge of technology and experience as a genealogist with others through various forms of social media and speaking engagements.  Through his business High-Definition Genealogy, he provides consulting services in the genealogy industry covering such areas as market research, education, technology and more.


    As the creator of GeneaBloggers.com, Thomas has organized and engaged a community of over 2,800 bloggers to document their own journeys in the search for ancestors.

  • 00:52

    Black Whalers w/ genealogist Earl Depass

    in Culture

    Black Whalers,  with genealogist Earl Depass!


    Whaling: Opportunities for African Americans 

    Four Whalers of African Descent

    The whaling industry, created several black abolitionists, entrepreneurs & philanthropists!

    Whaling Centered until the 1870s in New Bedford, employed a large number of African Americans. This was in part due to the Quaker tradition of tolerance in the New Bedford area, but more importantly, to the large demand for manpower in an expanding industry requiring unusually large crews.

    Some black seamen in the business were Americans, from the Northeast and the South, some were from the West Indies, and a significant group was from the Cape Verde Islands off the African coast. Whatever their origin, black seamen found acceptance as hard workers and skilled mariners in an industry that was physically demanding, dirty, and often financially unrewarding.

    When the center of the industry moved to San Francisco in the 1870s, African Americans continued to form a large percentage of the crews. The whaling business was no doubt the largest employer of African Americans seamen on the West Coast until it ended shortly before World War I.
     

  • 01:13

    Becoming A Professional Genealogist - Lisa B. Lee

    in History

    9pm Est, 8pm Central, 7pm Mountain, 6pm Pacific
    Do you know what it takes to become a professional genealogist?
    Join host Bernice Bennett and  Lisa B. Lee for a discussion of the process of what you need to know and do to become a professional genealogist.
    Professional genealogist Lisa B. Lee, is owner of GotGenealogy.com, a Web site designed to help genealogists make the most of their online searches. A graduate of the National Institute for Genealogical Studies (University of Toronto), she obtained her PLCGS with certificates in U.S., Canadian and Irish genealogy and methodology. Since the inception of ExpertConnect, by Ancestry.com in 2009, Ms. Lee was one of the original Experts, and conducted professional research for clients in the U.S. and Europe, until the demise of ExpertConnect in Early 2011. In addition to the Got Genealogy Gazette, dozens of her articles have been published in numerous genealogical journals and newsletters in North America.
     

  • 01:30

    African and Native American Research with Angela Walton-Raji

    in History

    Genealogist Angela Walton-Raji has committed herself to sharing information with the descendants of the Freedmen of Indian Territory--which is now Oklahoma. She is the author of  the book Black Indian Genealogy Research: African American Ancestors Among the Five Civilized Tribes. The book serves as a guide to researching the history and lives of the 20,000 Freedmen of Indian Territory, who have been deleted from American history. She is also the author of the http://african-nativeamerican.blogspot.com.


    The Dawes Commission, named after Henry C. Dawes who chaired the commission, consisted of a process that would lead to a redistribution of land to those who already owned it among the Five "Civilized" Tribes. Understand that land was held in common by the Five Civilized Tribes. The Dawes Enrollment process was created to determine who would be eligible for allotted parcels of land. Eligibility involved providing "proof" that one had been a part of the tribe for several decades, and especially in those years immediately following the Civil War. So one had to prove that one had been a part of the Indian Community since 1866. For those whose ancestors were enslaved by members of the Tribes, (the Freedmen)  they had to often provide proof that their former enslaver was a member of the tribe.

  • 01:00

    The Global Family Reunion with AJ Jacobs

    in History

    Join AJ Jacobs on today's show to find out about the Global Family Reunion, which will be held on 6 June 2015 at the New York Hall of Science, on the grounds of the World’s Fair in Queens. Journalist, lecturer, human guinea pig and author of four New York Times bestsellers, AJ is also host of the biggest, most inclusive and most fascinating family reunion in history. He will tell us what's in store for all attendees -- including talks by celebrities, scientists and comedians.


    Also with AJ today will be his chief genealogist and cousin coordinator, Eowyn Langholf, talking about the genealogy behind the event.  


    The Global Family Reunion will be featured in a documentary by Morgan Spurlock (Supersize Me).


    http://globalfamilyreunion.com/


    To volunteer for researching, contact Eowyn at gfrcousincoordinator@gmail.com.

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