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  • 00:29

    St. Fidelis of Sigmaringen, Franciscan Capuchin martyr

    in Religion

    Rebroadcast of the long running radio program, "The Ave Maria Hour", a presentation of the Franciscan Friars of the Atonement. www.AtonementFriars.org


    St. Fidelis of Sigmaringen, Franciscan Capuchin martyr.  He was born Mark Rey in Sigmaringen, Germany, in 1577. A practicing lawyer, he traveled across Europe as a tutor to aristocrats, but then he started defending the poor. In 1612, he became a Franciscan Capuchin monk, taking the name of Fidelis. He was missionary to Grisons, Switzerland, and he also served as the head of the Congregation for the Spreading of the Faith.


    He was so successful that local Protestants claimed that he was a spy for the Austrian Emperor. Fidelis was stabbed to death in a church in Seewis. He was canonized by Pope Benedict XIV. 

  • 01:30

    FRANCISCAN SPIRITUALITY

    in Spirituality

    Join us for a continuation of Franciscan spirituality which began on Oct.4, St.Francis feastday....

  • 00:30

    St. Justin de Jacobis

    in Religion

    Rebroadcast of the long running radio program, "The Ave Maria Hour", a presentation of the Franciscan Friars of the Atonement. www.AtonementFriars.org


    St. Justin de Jacobis -- Born at San Fele, Italy. At 18 he was ordained. After helping found a Vincentian house at Monopoly, he served as superior at Lecce and in 1839 was sent as the first prefect and vicar apostolic to the new Catholic mission at Adua, Ethiopia. His efforts to evangelize met with great opposition., but in 1841 he was included in a delegation of Ethiopian prelates to Cairo to request the Coptic patriarch of Alexandria to appoint one of his monks Abuna (patriarch) of the Ethiopian church. In Cairo, the patriarch denounced the presence of Father de Jacobis on the delegation and intrigued to a point one Salama as Abuna. Some of the delegation then accompanied Father de Jacobis to meet the Pope in Rome. On his return, Father de Jacobis founded a college and seminary at Guala, and in 1846 a vicariate apostolic of the Galla was established, with William Massaia as its first bishop. These developments caused Salama to launch an anti-Catholic campaign. The college was closed, Catholicism was proscribed, and bishop Massaia was forced to return to Aidan. In 1848, he secretly consecrated Father de Jacobis, now a fugitive, bishop at Massawa, with authority to administer the sacraments in the Ethiopian rite. By 1853, the new bishop had ordained some twenty Ethiopians, was ministering to 5000 Catholics, and was able to reopen the college. In 1860, Kedaref Kassa became king as Theodore II and in return for the backing he had received from Abuna Salama, launched a persecution of the Catholics. Bishop de Jacobis was arrested and improsoned. After release he managed to find his way to Halai in southern Eritrea. He spent the rest of his life in missionary work along the Red Sea coast and died in the valley of Alghedien.

  • 00:30

    Three White Veils for Sandra - Alessandra di Rudini

    in Religion

    Rebroadcast of the long running radio program, "The Ave Maria Hour", a presentation of the Franciscan Friars of the Atonement. www.AtonementFriars.org


    Alessandra di Rudini - The Marchesa Alessandra di Rudini, known in Carmel as Mother Marie of Jesus, came of an old Neapolitan family. Her privileged childhood was marred by her mother's ill-health and her father's womanizing. Perhaps it was the problems between her parents that led her to question her faith, a crisis which was reinforced by an atheistic teacher when she was thirteen. As Alessandra di Rudini became a young lady she moved in the highest circles of European society. A Russian Grand Duke wanted to marry her but Alessandra would not renounce her Catholic faith as would have been required, showing that her convictions may have been deeper than her doubts.

  • 00:31

    St. Lorenzo Giustiniani

    in Religion

    Rebroadcast of the long running radio program, "The Ave Maria Hour", a presentation of the Franciscan Friars of the Atonement. www.AtonementFriars.org


    Born to the Venetian nobility; his ancestors had fled Constantinople for political reasons. Against his widowed mother‘s wishes, he chose against marriage and for the religious life. Augustinian canon regular at San Giorgio, Alga, Italy in 1400. Spent his days wandering the island, begging for the poor. Ordained in 1406. Noted preacher and teacher of the faith. Held assorted administrative positions within his Order. Reluctant bishop of Castello, Italy in 1433. General of the canons regular. Bishop of Grado, Italy in 1451; the see was then moved to Venice, Italy, and Laurence was named archbishop and patriarch by Pope Nicholas V. Noted writer on mystical contemplation. Had the gift of prophecy. Miracle worker.

  • 00:30

    The Day of the Lord

    in Religion

    The Day of the Lord


    Rebroadcast of the long running radio program, "The Ave Maria Hour", a presentation of the Franciscan Friars of the Atonement. www.AtonementFriars.org


    First broadcasted in the 1950's, this episode is set in the future ... a story of the future ... when the great events depicted will happen, no man can foretell. But the fact of their happening is foretold in the Bible. This is the story of The Day of the Lord.

  • 00:29

    Olaf Tryggvesson

    in Religion

    Rebroadcast of the long running radio program, "The Ave Maria Hour", a presentation of the Franciscan Friars of the Atonement. www.AtonementFriars.org


    Olaf Tryggvesson - (born c. 964—died c. 1000), Viking king of Norway (995–c. 1000), much celebrated in Scandinavian literature, who made the first effective effort to Christianize Norway.


    Already a Christian, Olaf was confirmed at Andover (in modern Hampshire) in 994, with Ethelred, with whom he had been reconciled, as his godfather. Learning of the growing revolt against the Norwegian king Haakon the Great, Olaf returned to Norway and was accepted as king on Haakon’s death in 995. He forcefully imposed Christianity on the areas under his control, the coast and the western islands, but had little influence elsewhere. By commissioning missionaries and baptizing visiting dignitaries, Olaf was able to introduce Christianity to the Shetland, Faroe, and Orkney islands and to Iceland and Greenland. (Christianity was adopted by the Icelandic parliament [Althing] about 1000). 


    Olaf met his death in the Battle of Svolder (c. 1000) at the hands of the Danish king Sweyn I, the Swedish king Olaf Skötkonung, and Eric the Norwegian, earl of Lade. 

  • 00:30

    Fourteenth Station - Jesus is laid in the tomb

    in Religion

    Rebroadcast of the long running radio program, "The Ave Maria Hour", a presentation of the Franciscan Friars of the Atonement. www.AtonementFriars.org


    After Jesus died, his body was placed in a tomb. This was better treatment than many crucified people would have received. Their bodies were often discarded by Roman soldiers and left exposed, unless they had families or friends nearby to care for them. The body of Jesus was fortunate enough to receive unusual attention from a man named Joseph, who was both a member of the Sanhedrin and a follower of Jesus. He made sure the body of his Master was appropriately buried, so that, later, the bones of Jesus could be finally interred in an ossuary (a special box for bones). Little did Joseph know that God had other plans for the body of Jesus.

  • 00:30

    St. Peregrine - Patron Saint of Cancer Patients

    in Religion

    Rebroadcast of the long running radio program, "The Ave Maria Hour", a presentation of the Franciscan Friars of the Atonement. www.AtonementFriars.org


    St. Peregrine - St. Peregrine was born in Forli, Italy, around 1265. At that time, Forli was governed by the Pope as part of the Papal States, and Peregrine grew up in a family that was actively involved in the opposition, or anti-papal party. Because of anti-papal activity, the city was under the church penalty of interdict, meaning that Mass and the Sacraments could not be celebrated there. St. Philip Benizi, Prior General of the Servants of Mary, went to Forli to preach reconciliation. Young Peregrine, very intense in his political fervor, not only heckled Philip during his preaching, but, in fact, struck him. Philip, instead of responding with anger and violence to the attack, turned and forgave Peregrine.


    This encounter with Philip is said to have dramatically changed Peregrine. He began channeling his energy into good works and eventually joined the Servants of Mary in Siena, Italy. He returned to Forli, where he spent the rest of his life, dedicating himself to the sick, the poor, and those on the fringes of society. He also imposed on himself the penance of standing whenever it was not necessary to sit. This led to varicose veins, which later deteriorated into an open sore on his leg, and was eventually diagnosed as cancer.


    Peregrine's leg wound became so serious that the local surgeon decided to amputate the leg. The night before the surgery, Peregrine prayed before the image of the crucified Christ, and when he awoke, the wound was healed and his leg saved. He lived another 20 years, dying on May 1, 1345, and the age of about 80. Peregrine was canonized on December 27, 1726, and has been named the Patron Saint of those suffering from cancer.

  • 00:28

    Mother Emmanuela - Mary Emmanuela Franciscan

    in Religion

    Rebroadcast of the long running radio program, "The Ave Maria Hour", a presentation of the Franciscan Friars of the Atonement. www.atonementfriars.org
    Mother Emmanuela - Born Mary Emmanuela.  She gave up a life of selfishness and privilege to become Mother Emmanuela and founded a Franciscan convent.

  • 00:29

    St. John of Sahagon

    in Religion

    Rebroadcast of the long running radio program, "The Ave Maria Hour", a presentation of the Franciscan Friars of the Atonement. www.AtonementFriars.org


    John Gonzales de Castrillo was born at Sahagun, Leon Spain. He was educated by the Benedictine monks of Fagondez monastery there and when twenty, received a canonry from the bishop of Burgos, though he already had several benefices. He was ordained in 1445; concerned about the evil of pluralism, he resigned all his benefices except that of St. Agatha in Burgos. He spent the next four years studying at the University of Salamanca and then began to preach. In the next decade he achieved a great reputation as a preacher and spiritual director, but after recovering after a serious operation, became an Augustinian friar in 1463 and was professed the following year. He served as master of novices, definitor, prior at Salamanca, experienced visions, was famous for his miracles, and had the gift of reading men's souls. He denounced evil in high places and several attempts were made on his life. He died at Sahagun on June 11, reportedly poisoned by the mistress of a man he had convinced to leave her. He was canonized in 1690 as St. John of Sahagun.