• 01:27

    Having Fun with Corinne Dekker!

    in Entertainment

    Corinne Dekker has certainly made the rounds these days! This comedic lady has been on television shows such as Jennie Garth : A Little Bit Country as Jennie Garth's assistant,  How I Met Your Mother, and Ugly Betty, just to name a few.  And she has a few films coming up as well! We're looking forward to hearing all about her adventures in Hollywood and her continuing journey as she creates her vlogs, which can be seen on youtube at ch.cdekker75, and her tweets on twitter are becoming quite the rage because they are hilarious!! She's even involved in an animal rescue for Guinea Pigs! We're really looking forward to having a fun, unique, indepth and hilarious time with Corinne!

  • 01:56

    The Celebrity Link #Celebrating Reggae Icon Desmond Dekker with host Bro Blue

    in Music

    https://www.facebook.com/reggaebillboardchart #reggae #reggaebillboardchart #nowplaying


    The Entertainment Celebrity Link Desmond Dekker (16 July 1941 – 25 May 2006[1]) was a Jamaican ska, rocksteady and reggae singer-songwriter and musician. Together with his backing group, The Aces (consisting of Wilson James and Easton Barrington Howard), he had one of the earliest international reggae hits with "Israelites" (1968). Other hits include "007 (Shanty Town)" (1967), "It Mek" (1969) and "You Can Get It If You Really Want" (1970).Desmond Adolphus Dacres was born in Saint Andrew Parish (Greater Kingston), Jamaica, on 16 July 1941. Dekker spent his early formative years in Kingston, the capital of Jamaica. From a very young age Dekker would regularly attend the local church with his grandmother and aunt. This early religious upbringing as well as his enjoyment of singing hymns led to a lifelong religious commitment. Following his mother's death as a result of illness, Dekker moved to the parish of St. Mary and then later to St. Thomas. While at St. Thomas Dekker embarked on an apprenticeship as a tailor before returning to Kingston where he secured employment as a welder. His workplace singing had drawn the attention of his co-workers who encouraged him to pursue a career in the music industry. In 1961 he auditioned for Coxsone Dodd (Studio One) and Duke Reid (Treasure Isle) though neither audition was successful. The young unsigned vocalist then successfully auditioned for Leslie Kong's Beverley's record label and was awarded his first recording contract.

  • 00:57

    Green Bay Packers-Dallas Cowboys Preview, Wisconsin coaching changes

    in Sports

    We'll preview the Green Bay Packers and Dallas Cowboys -- can Aaron Rodgers and the offense continue their impressive performance against former Badger Nick Hayden's defense? Will Clay Matthews and Julius Peppers contain a potent Dallas offense featuring Tony Romo, DeMarco Murray and fellow former Badgers linemen Travis Frederick?


    We'll also discuss the Wisconsin Badgers' Outback Bowl victory against the Auburn Tigers, as well as the reports regarding new hires for head coach Paul Chryst. Also, is Melvin Gordon the greatest running back in Wisconsin history? We'll debate.

  • 00:32

    Reader's Entertainment Presents Ted Dekker and Tosca Lee

    in Books

    Best selling authors Ted Dekker and Tosca Lee join us.

  • 01:12

    Wisconsin-Maryland preview; hoops season coming up

    in Sports

    Our Wednesday football spectacular returns with two great guest and plenty of Wisconsin Badgers audio from Monday's press conference.


    At 8:10 p.m., the Green Bay Press Gazette's Wes Hodkiewicz stops by to help us preview the Sunday night match-up between the Green Bay Packers and the New Orleans Saints. Can Aaron Rodgers, Clay Matthews, and Randall Cobb pull off the road win against Drew Brees and a desperate Saints team that could go to 2-5?


    At 8:40 p.m., Fox Sports Wisconsin's Jesse Temple joins the show to help us preview the Badgers' 2014 homecoming game against the Maryland Terrapins. How will Sojourn Shelton, Darius Hillary, and the Badgers' defense contain Stefon Diggs and the Terps' receiving corps, along with mobile quarterback C.J. Brown? Will Melvin Gordon have another big game, and what are the keys to Saturday's game? 


    We'll also touch base with Jesse about Badgers basketball media days, and today's charity event #MakeBoPay


    Plus, we'll talk a bit of the World Series, and play some great audio featuring Gordon, seniors Rob Havenstein & Konrad Zagzebski, along with junior safety Michael Caputo.

  • 00:17

    Cruzing Sundays: Strictly Reggae Music before the 70's with KING MOHICAN

    in Music


    The history of Jamaica's music is a fascinating one, and seldom has a nation's pop music been so celebratory, political, and concerned with civil rights, all rolled into an upside-down one-drop rhythm that is as recognizable as it is pervasive. Part mento, part African drums, part American jazz, soul, and R&B, part a Marcus Garvey-derived treatise on human rights and repatriation, Jamaica's reggae is pop music with clear revolutionary goals, intent on dancing in the face of Babylon while forthrightly chanting it down. This Is Reggae Music hits most of the historical high points, including Jamaica's entry into the international pop market with early hits like Millie Small's "My Boy Lollipop" (arranged by the venerable Ernest Ranglin) and Desmond Dekker's "Israelites," following these up with key tracks from Jimmy Cliff's The Harder They Come soundtrack (including Cliff's own "Many Rivers to Cross," the Maytals' "Pressure Drop," the Melodians' "Rivers of Babylon," and the Slickers' immortal "Johnny Too Bad" and some early reggae gems like Marley's "Duppy Conqueror" (produced by Lee "Scratch" Perry), the Heptones' "Hypocrite," and Cliff's "Vietnam." The final disc finds reggae poised to take over the world (on the wings of one Bob Marley), and includes essential tracks like Delroy Wilson's "Better Must Come," Zap Pow's bit of reggae-meets-Stax, "This Is Reggae Music," Slim Smith's stunningly beautiful "The Time Has Come," and the concluding song, the classic Jack Ruby-produced "Marcus Garvey" by Burning Spear.www.crsradio.com www.caribbeanradio.com

  • 03:56

    LIVE: Vintage Music Vibrations with KING MOHICAN on the Tower

    in Music


    The history of Jamaica's music is a fascinating one, and seldom has a nation's pop music been so celebratory, political, and concerned with civil rights, all rolled into an upside-down one-drop rhythm that is as recognizable as it is pervasive. Part mento, part African drums, part American jazz, soul, and R&B, part a Marcus Garvey-derived treatise on human rights and repatriation, Jamaica's reggae is pop music with clear revolutionary goals, intent on dancing in the face of Babylon while forthrightly chanting it down. This Is Reggae Music hits most of the historical high points, including Jamaica's entry into the international pop market with early hits like Millie Small's "My Boy Lollipop" (arranged by the venerable Ernest Ranglin) and Desmond Dekker's "Israelites," following these up with key tracks from Jimmy Cliff's The Harder They Come soundtrack (including Cliff's own "Many Rivers to Cross," the Maytals' "Pressure Drop," the Melodians' "Rivers of Babylon," and the Slickers' immortal "Johnny Too Bad" and some early reggae gems like Marley's "Duppy Conqueror" (produced by Lee "Scratch" Perry), the Heptones' "Hypocrite," and Cliff's "Vietnam." The final disc finds reggae poised to take over the world (on the wings of one Bob Marley), and includes essential tracks like Delroy Wilson's "Better Must Come," Zap Pow's bit of reggae-meets-Stax, "This Is Reggae Music," Slim Smith's stunningly beautiful "The Time Has Come," and the concluding song, the classic Jack Ruby-produced "Marcus Garvey" by Burning Spear.www.crsradio.com www.caribbeanradio.com

  • 02:51

    Cruzing Sundays: Strictly Reggae Music before the 70's with KING MOHICAN

    in Music


    The history of Jamaica's music is a fascinating one, and seldom has a nation's pop music been so celebratory, political, and concerned with civil rights, all rolled into an upside-down one-drop rhythm that is as recognizable as it is pervasive. Part mento, part African drums, part American jazz, soul, and R&B, part a Marcus Garvey-derived treatise on human rights and repatriation, Jamaica's reggae is pop music with clear revolutionary goals, intent on dancing in the face of Babylon while forthrightly chanting it down. This Is Reggae Music hits most of the historical high points, including Jamaica's entry into the international pop market with early hits like Millie Small's "My Boy Lollipop" (arranged by the venerable Ernest Ranglin) and Desmond Dekker's "Israelites," following these up with key tracks from Jimmy Cliff's The Harder They Come soundtrack (including Cliff's own "Many Rivers to Cross," the Maytals' "Pressure Drop," the Melodians' "Rivers of Babylon," and the Slickers' immortal "Johnny Too Bad" and some early reggae gems like Marley's "Duppy Conqueror" (produced by Lee "Scratch" Perry), the Heptones' "Hypocrite," and Cliff's "Vietnam." The final disc finds reggae poised to take over the world (on the wings of one Bob Marley), and includes essential tracks like Delroy Wilson's "Better Must Come," Zap Pow's bit of reggae-meets-Stax, "This Is Reggae Music," Slim Smith's stunningly beautiful "The Time Has Come," and the concluding song, the classic Jack Ruby-produced "Marcus Garvey" by Burning Spear.www.crsradio.com www.caribbeanradio.com

  • 03:48

    Cruzing Sundays:Reggae Music 40's- 70's with Special Festival Song KING MOHICAN

    in Music


    The history of Jamaica's music is a fascinating one, and seldom has a nation's pop music been so celebratory, political, and concerned with civil rights, all rolled into an upside-down one-drop rhythm that is as recognizable as it is pervasive. Part mento, part African drums, part American jazz, soul, and R&B, part a Marcus Garvey-derived treatise on human rights and repatriation, Jamaica's reggae is pop music with clear revolutionary goals, intent on dancing in the face of Babylon while forthrightly chanting it down. This Is Reggae Music hits most of the historical high points, including Jamaica's entry into the international pop market with early hits like Millie Small's "My Boy Lollipop" (arranged by the venerable Ernest Ranglin) and Desmond Dekker's "Israelites," following these up with key tracks from Jimmy Cliff's The Harder They Come soundtrack (including Cliff's own "Many Rivers to Cross," the Maytals' "Pressure Drop," the Melodians' "Rivers of Babylon," and the Slickers' immortal "Johnny Too Bad" and some early reggae gems like Marley's "Duppy Conqueror" (produced by Lee "Scratch" Perry), the Heptones' "Hypocrite," and Cliff's "Vietnam." The final disc finds reggae poised to take over the world (on the wings of one Bob Marley), and includes essential tracks like Delroy Wilson's "Better Must Come," Zap Pow's bit of reggae-meets-Stax, "This Is Reggae Music," Slim Smith's stunningly beautiful "The Time Has Come," and the concluding song, the classic Jack Ruby-produced "Marcus Garvey" by Burning Spear.www.crsradio.com www.caribbeanradio.com

  • 01:57

    The Celebrity Link: #1 songs by Jamaicans reaching UK Singles National Chart

    in Music

    The Celebrity Link: #1 songs  by Jamaicans  reaching UK Singles National Chart


    The incidence of Jamaican recordings reaching the United Kingdom charts and impacting British culture has become commonplace.
    Millie Small’s 1964 remake of Barbie Gaye’s 1957 R&B hit, My Boy Lollipop set the trend when it climbed to No. 2 on the British charts.
    It effectively opened the floodgates for a deluge of Jamaican recordings to flow incessantly onto the British charts.
    Earlier, others like Laurel Aitken and Dandy Livingstone created an initial impact, with Aitken’s Boogie in My Bones and Little Sheila in 1957 becoming the first Jamaican-made recordings to be distributed in England.


    A couple years after Millie Small’s hit, ska legend Prince Buster burst onto the UK music scene with the ultimate rude-boy song, Al capone Guns Don’t Argue, which established his career in Britain.


    The year 1967 saw the biggest Jamaica-UK hit of that period, when Desmond Dekker’s 007 (Shanty Town) found its way to the No. 14 slot on the charts.


    Dekker, who had ushered in a more conscious form of Jamaican rocksteady, revealed to the outside world, through the recording, the condition of ghetto dwellers and gun-toting hoodlums in a society going through a transition:


    Two years later, Dekker and the Aces would return to register Jamaica’s greatest impact on the UK charts and the first Jamaican record to hit the No. 1 spot there — Israelites.


    Although few could understand its lyrics, it became a timeless masterpiece, merely on the strength of its intense reggae beat, reaching the top in April 1969.http://www.herald.co.zw/jamaican-music-rules-uk/ 661-467-2407 www.crsradio.com

  • 00:29

    Success Secrets of Enterprising Women - Carolann Dekker

    in Business

    Carolann Dekker is CEO & Founder of Top Dekk Sailing Network & Apparel, a company she founded in 2010.  A seasoned and accomplished marketing professional, Carolann started Top Dekk Sailing Network and Apparel after more than two decades of experience in marketing, developing online communities and licensed apparel programs working with some of the most well-known, respected sporting events, enterprises and high-profile entrepreneurs.  Chief among them are the America’s Cup and the Super Bowl events.  In addition, Carolann oversaw marketing and community development for Tony Robbins, noted world authority on leadership and CollegeClub.com, the first online community to connect over 15 million college students from around the globe.  Carolann is now engaged in building a community that empowers women to access the yachting lifestyle utilizing the latest online social media tools and by offering a unique line of fashionably technical sailing apparel designed to take women from the boat to the party.  www.TopDekk.com

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