• 01:59

    Salasaca Aymara (Quechua) National President Nicolas Chango

    in Religion

    Show was delayed due to unknown issues on Blogtalk's end.


    Prerecorded...


    Past Salasaca National President Nicolas "Miguel" Chango at the United Nation--Indigenous Leader from Ecuador

    By Steve Grove


    June 16, 2004


    In one way or another, Nicholas Chango has been preparing for leadership since the day he was born. The elders of his tribe in Ecuador, the Salasaca, predicted that Chango would be a great leader, and commemorated his birth with many ceremonies. From an early age, Chango says, they put him through an intense training program that sometimes lasted 15 hours a day.


    Brought to a cornfield in the early hours of the morning, Chango was taught to listen to nature and pray to the sun.


    "[The elders] helped me to understand that all the land is interconnected, " Chango remembers. Later, these elders (called yachaj) wanted Chango to learn how to represent the Salasaca in Ecuadorian society. So they sent him to high school outside of the village.


    There, Chango came into contact with non-indigenous Ecuadorians and a society that has a long history of oppression of indigenous peoples. Spanish conquistadors came to Equador in 1534, taking control of the land and weakening the indigenous population with disease. Many Salasacan women were reportedly used as forced laborers. In the 21st century, conflicts between the groups have continued, as indigenous groups wrestle with the mestizo population for a voice in the country’s tenuous democracy.


     

  • 02:00

    Nicolas Chango, Salasaca Aymara- Ecuadorian Indigenous People's Defense Office

    in Religion

    Past Salasaca National President Nicolas "Miguel" Chango at the United Nations
    Nicholas Chango—Indigenous Leader from Ecuador (LinkedIn)(Website)(Facebook)


    In one way or another, Nicholas Chango has been preparing for leadership since the day he was born. The elders of his tribe in Ecuador, the Salasaca, predicted that Chango would be a great leader, and commemorated his birth with many ceremonies. From an early age, Chango says, they put him through an intense training program that sometimes lasted 15 hours a day.


    Brought to a cornfield in the early hours of the morning, Chango was taught to listen to nature and pray to the sun.


    "[The elders] helped me to understand that all the land is interconnected, " Chango remembers. Later, these elders (called yachaj) wanted Chango to learn how to represent the Salasaca in Ecuadorian society. So they sent him to high school outside of the village.


    There, Chango came into contact with non-indigenous Ecuadorians and a society that has a long history of oppression of indigenous peoples. Spanish conquistadors came to Equador in 1534, taking control of the land and weakening the indigenous population with disease. Many Salasacan women were reportedly used as forced laborers. In the 21st century, conflicts between the groups have continued, as indigenous groups wrestle with the mestizo population for a voice in the country’s tenuous democracy.


    After his high school graduation, Chango envisioned a future of political activism for the Salasacan people in mainstream Ecuadorian society. But Chango’s life changed drastically in 1989.


     


     


     

  • 02:06

    Prophecykeepers - Salasaca Aymara Nicolas Chango of Equador

    in Spirituality

    Prerecorded...
    Past Salasaca National President Nicolas "Miguel" Chango at the United Nation--Indigenous Leader from Ecuador By Steve Grove
    June 16, 2004
    In one way or another, Nicholas Chango has been preparing for leadership since the day he was born. The elders of his tribe in Ecuador, the Salasaca, predicted that Chango would be a great leader, and commemorated his birth with many ceremonies. From an early age, Chango says, they put him through an intense training program that sometimes lasted 15 hours a day.
    Brought to a cornfield in the early hours of the morning, Chango was taught to listen to nature and pray to the sun.
    "[The elders] helped me to understand that all the land is interconnected, " Chango remembers. Later, these elders (called yachaj) wanted Chango to learn how to represent the Salasaca in Ecuadorian society. So they sent him to high school outside of the village.
    There, Chango came into contact with non-indigenous Ecuadorians and a society that has a long history of oppression of indigenous peoples. Spanish conquistadors came to Equador in 1534, taking control of the land and weakening the indigenous population with disease. Many Salasacan women were reportedly used as forced laborers. In the 21st century, conflicts between the groups have continued, as indigenous groups wrestle with the mestizo population for a voice in the country’s tenuous democracy.

  • 00:01

    LA SEMANA DEL "HOMECOMING"

    in Education

    Cynthia y Mariah, hosts of Radio Chango, will talk about the Homecoming taking place this week at Howard University

  • 02:50

    Prophecykeepers Radio - Salasaca Aymara Elder Nicolas Chango

    in Spirituality

    Prerecorded...
    Past Salasaca National President Nicolas "Miguel" Chango at the United Nation--Indigenous Leader from Ecuador

    By Steve Grove
    June 16, 2004
    In one way or another, Nicholas Chango has been preparing for leadership since the day he was born. The elders of his tribe in Ecuador, the Salasaca, predicted that Chango would be a great leader, and commemorated his birth with many ceremonies. From an early age, Chango says, they put him through an intense training program that sometimes lasted 15 hours a day.
    Brought to a cornfield in the early hours of the morning, Chango was taught to listen to nature and pray to the sun.
    "[The elders] helped me to understand that all the land is interconnected, " Chango remembers. Later, these elders (called yachaj) wanted Chango to learn how to represent the Salasaca in Ecuadorian society. So they sent him to high school outside of the village.
    There, Chango came into contact with non-indigenous Ecuadorians and a society that has a long history of oppression of indigenous peoples. Spanish conquistadors came to Equador in 1534, taking control of the land and weakening the indigenous population with disease. Many Salasacan women were reportedly used as forced laborers. In the 21st century, conflicts between the groups have continued, as indigenous groups wrestle with the mestizo population for a voice in the country’s tenuous democracy.

  • 00:29

    CONTROVERSIAL ART EXHIBIT IN LONDON

    in Education

    Cynthia and Mariah will talk about a controversial art exhibit in London, by a South African artist. News from Howard University will be discussed too.

  • 00:01

    Ebola y Otras Noticias

    in Education

    Cynthia and Mariah will talk about Ebola and Critical Languages scholarships for Study Abroa

  • 02:06

    Prophecykeepers Radio - Salasaca Aymara Elder Nicolas Chango

    in Spirituality

    Past Salasaca National President Nicolas "Miguel" Chango at the United Nation--Indigenous Leader from Ecuador

    By Steve Grove
    June 16, 2004
    In one way or another, Nicholas Chango has been preparing for leadership since the day he was born. The elders of his tribe in Ecuador, the Salasaca, predicted that Chango would be a great leader, and commemorated his birth with many ceremonies. From an early age, Chango says, they put him through an intense training program that sometimes lasted 15 hours a day.
    Brought to a cornfield in the early hours of the morning, Chango was taught to listen to nature and pray to the sun.
    "[The elders] helped me to understand that all the land is interconnected, " Chango remembers. Later, these elders (called yachaj) wanted Chango to learn how to represent the Salasaca in Ecuadorian society. So they sent him to high school outside of the village.
    There, Chango came into contact with non-indigenous Ecuadorians and a society that has a long history of oppression of indigenous peoples. Spanish conquistadors came to Equador in 1534, taking control of the land and weakening the indigenous population with disease. Many Salasacan women were reportedly used as forced laborers. In the 21st century, conflicts between the groups have continued, as indigenous groups wrestle with the mestizo population for a voice in the country’s tenuous democracy.

  • 02:01

    Prophecykeepers - Salasaca National President Nicolas Chango

    in Spirituality

    Prerecorded...
    Past Salasaca National President Nicolas "Miguel" Chango at the United Nation--Indigenous Leader from Ecuador By Steve Grove
    June 16, 2004
    In one way or another, Nicholas Chango has been preparing for leadership since the day he was born. The elders of his tribe in Ecuador, the Salasaca, predicted that Chango would be a great leader, and commemorated his birth with many ceremonies. From an early age, Chango says, they put him through an intense training program that sometimes lasted 15 hours a day.
    Brought to a cornfield in the early hours of the morning, Chango was taught to listen to nature and pray to the sun.
    "[The elders] helped me to understand that all the land is interconnected, " Chango remembers. Later, these elders (called yachaj) wanted Chango to learn how to represent the Salasaca in Ecuadorian society. So they sent him to high school outside of the village.
    There, Chango came into contact with non-indigenous Ecuadorians and a society that has a long history of oppression of indigenous peoples. Spanish conquistadors came to Equador in 1534, taking control of the land and weakening the indigenous population with disease. Many Salasacan women were reportedly used as forced laborers. In the 21st century, conflicts between the groups have continued, as indigenous groups wrestle with the mestizo population for a voice in the country’s tenuous democracy.

  • 02:00

    Talking with The Elders: The True Essence of Shango

    in Spirituality

    Dia Nunez of the H20 Network hosts a discussion with Lukumi elders Oba Ernesto Pichardo, and Baba Antonio Mondesire about Shango. What dos that word REALLY mean. How does that energy move in our environment, and our lives.How can we use this energy to improve our world and ourselves. and Lastly, How this connects to 2014 reading of the year. Join Us!!

  • 00:16

    INTERVIEW WITH LEAH HAIRSTON

    in Education

    Student at Howard University, and president-to-be (Fall 2013) of Chango, Howard University Spanish Cultural Society, Leah Hairsto will talk about her early passion for travel abroad and her cultural experiences.

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