• 00:46

    The First Amendment And A Stroll Through American History

    in Politics Conservative

    Today's show is inspired by a piece on Charisma News concerning the misunderstanding of our First Amendment and especially that pesky establishment clause and notion of "separation of church and state".  But it also comes down to something that I enjoy getting into because so much of our history is covered up, forgotten, or not brought up.  More than likely unless something big happens in the news that I feel like I absolutely need to talk about, this will be a series of shows going forward, as some of the information, which is by no means all the information available, that I would like to present is very valuable and will indeed stretch over several shows.  It may even hopefully stretch out into "good government God's way", as I believe if we practiced good government God's way, we wouldn't have anywhere near the messes that we have today that have built up over these many years.  So buckle up and settle in for some references and examples going back hundreds of years and some going back even only 30-40 years as we take a ride down History Lane together, starting today at 4:30 PM and archived later.


     



     

  • 02:11

    American History X, 1998

    in Movies

    American History X , a 1998 film directed by Tony Kaye and written by David McKenna. It stars Edward Norton and Edward Furlong. Two Venice, Los Angeles brothers  involved in the neo-Nazi movement. The older brother serves three years in prison for voluntary manslaughter, changes his beliefs and tries to prevent his brother from going down the same path. The film is told in the style of nonlinear narrative. It grossed over $23 million at the international box office.


     Edward Norton and Edward Furlong

  • 00:38

    The Significance of African American History

    in History

    On this Episode We will talk to Mr. Tambuzi about the significance  of African American History. Mr. Tambuzi is one fo the the people who influenced me to do more and be more.   


    Mr. Tambuzi is a co-founder of the Affordable Housing Coalition of San Diego and served as its first treasurer. Additionally, he served as consultant to the Southeastern Economic Development Corp. (SEDC); working on employment and job readiness issues, and Christ Church of San Diego, Inc., as program coordinator for their Supplemental Educations Services Program, an outgrowth of No Child Left Behind legislation initiated by the Bush Administration.


    Mr. Tambuzi is a civic and community advocate/activist with a focus on social and economic justice issues.  As such, he has been a member of the Organization Us, the founding organization of Kwanzaa and has been a practitioner of the holiday for as long.  He also serves on the County of San Diego Health and Human Services Agency Healthy Works Leadership Team and he is the co-facilitator of the County of San Diego Central Region Health Advisory Team.


    Tambuzi helped organize many events, including the annual Cesar Chavez Walk in Lincoln Park, Kwanzaa celebrations, a farmer’s market and food co-op for seniors. Tambuzi is a graduate of LEAD San Diego and served as the president of African-American Writers and Artists, Inc. for two years.


    Mr. Tambuzi attended San Diego City College, where his major focus of study was journalism, and the University of California, at San Diego, majoring in both Communications and Sociology. He has been married for the past twenty-eight years to Aminisha Tambuzi, co-founder and choreographer for the Teye Sa Thiosane African Drum and Dance Company.  Mr. Tambuzi is the father of six adult children and has nine grandchildren.

  • 00:45

    Sabra Waldfogel Shifts a Novelist Perspective on American History

    in Lifestyle

    Sabra Waldfogel grew up far from the South in Minneapolis. She studied history at Harvard University and received her Ph.D. in American History from the University of Minnesota. She has worked as a technical writer and has written about historic architecture for Old House Journal and Arts and Crafts Homes. Her short story "Yemaya” was recently published in Sixfold's January 2014 issue. Slave and Sister is her first novel.


    Will they be rivals or allies? The age-old struggle between sisters is skillfully brought to life in Slave and Sister, by Sabra Waldfogel. In the antebellum South, relations between slaves and their owners are conflicted enough; if there are blood ties, the tension can become a lethal storm.

    It was common in the antebellum South to raise a slave alongside the heir. But it was a surprise to both Adelaide and Rachel to discover they shared the same father. In a mesmerizing tale marked by impeccable historical accuracy, we begin by learning that scouts for General Sherman stumble upon a plantation that's anything but ordinary: it flies the Union flag and the freed slaves can read and write, and work the former plantation themselves.

     

  • 00:18

    V.O.T.M.: BLACK CONTRIBUTIONS TO AMERICAN HISTORY

    in History

    JOIN US AS WE LOOK BACK INTO AMERICAN HISTORY AND AT WHAT "AFRICAN-AMERICAN" PEOPLE HAVE DONE THAT WAS GREATLY APPRECIATED FOR "AFRICAN-AMERICANS" OF TODAY.

  • 02:11

    American History X -- Movie Review

    in Sports

    American History X , a 1998 film directed by Tony Kaye and written by David McKenna. It stars Edward Norton and Edward Furlong. Two Venice, Los Angeles brothers  involved in the neo-Nazi movement. The older brother serves three years in prison for voluntary manslaughter, changes his beliefs and tries to prevent his brother from going down the same path. The film is told in the style of nonlinear narrative. It grossed over $23 million at the international box office.

  • 02:06

    Should African American History Be A Required Subject For All Students?

    in Women

    Racism seems to be so ingrained in American culture, it's as if it's being taught. Attitudes of disrespect and disdain toward African Americans are reinforced by stereotypes of criminal behavior, low morals,  incompetence, laziness and ignorance. But the real history and legacy of African Americans shows just the opposite. How do we change negative beliefs about a major segment of America's population? Should African American history be a required course for all school children? Would that improve race relations among the youth? What about adults? Should employees in sensitive positions such as those jobs related to criminal justice be required to take an African American history course to sensitize them? Filmaker Lia Crawford and Author and historian Alvin Boyce Munson discuss some little known facts about African Americans that could change attitude regarding race, if made widely known

  • 01:02

    African American Pioneers in San Jose & John Brown W/ Prof. Libby

    in Education

    Professor Jean Libby  will discuss the relationship between John Brown and African American pioneers in San Jose, California. She'll also feature two books:  Herbert Ruffin, Uninvited Neighbors; African Americans in Silicon Valley 1860-1990 (2014) and Erica Armstrong Dunbar A Fragile Freedom; African American Women in the Antebellum South (2008).


     



    Establishment of The AME Zion Church in NYC and St. Philip's Episcopal on Wall St. (1820)
    The Cassey Delancy St. Home, National Historic Site
    Establishement of  the first secondary school
    Lovie Spencer, scholar and researcher
    Establishments of Episcopal Churches in California


     

  • 00:59

    Is Your Head On Straight About African American History Month?

    in Youth

    Young Media Critics- voices of the future will discuss African American History Month also known as Black History Month.  Do you know who created "Negro History Week" and in what year?  "If a race has no history,it has no worthwhile tradtion, it becomes a negligible factor in the thought of the world."


    The Young Media Crtiics will voice their opinions along with facts about how the media influences portrayals in the achievements of African Americans now and in the past.


    JOIN IN THE CONVERSATION ON TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2014 AT 5:00 p.m. EST


     

  • 01:18

    Is Your Head On Straight About African American History Month? -Part 2

    in Youth

     


    Young Media Critics- voices of the future will continue to discuss African American History Month also known as Black History Month.  We learned who created "Negro History Week" – Carter Woodson and in 1926.   


    Our Young Media Critics shared with us that President Gerald Ford, in 1976 proclaimed February African American History Month. 


    Young Media Critics continue to voice  their opinions along with facts about how the media influences portrayals in the achievements of African Americans now and in the past.


    JOIN IN THE CONVERSATION ON TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2014 AT 5:00 p.m. EST

  • 02:00

    Abraham Bolden -Black History Month: William Federer - American History

    in Christianity

    Abraham Bolden, first African-American to be part of the Presidential secret service team (JFK era), will be returning.  He will discussing what he lived through, how times have changed over the course of history and other key points of interest as we honor him as a guest for Black History month.


    In the second hour, historian William Federer of American Minute will join us to share pivotal moments in American history.  William and his wife Susie Federer wrote: "Miracles in American History:32 Amazing Stories of Answered Prayer" and "George Washington Carver: His Life and Faith in His Own Words".


    Sure to be an intriguing two hours with these fascinating and honorable men.

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