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Expressing Art Through Fashion: Designer Timothy K.

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Timothy Kuzmeski “Timothy K” was born in Hartford, Connecticut and showed great promise early on. In middle school he was already winning awards in national design competitions in architectural design and drafting. A passion for fine art and the human figure spurred the switch from architecture to fashion design where he earned the gold key award in the national portfolio competition and entrance to the nation’s top art schools.At the Pratt Institute of Design, he earned an apprenticeship with the East Village couturier Garo Sparo, eventually earning the position as his couture assistant and dressmaker, a position that in combination with other positions in company’s such as Chado Ralph Rucci, would prove invaluable through the knowledge he would gain over the course of the next couple years. In May 2010, he graduated with a BFA. in fashion design from the Pratt Institute of Design in NYC. His senior thesis collection earned him the Renee Hunter evening wear award, work within the Viktor & Rolf atelier in Europe and other prestigious industry honors. He's been featured in publications, newspapers, websites, and blogs across the nation.The House of Timothy K was officially created in 2010 as a merging of talents amongst a group of young artists under the design direction of Timothy Kuzmeski following his acclaimed undergraduate collection, “Opus 1.” ”Using the human body as its natural canvas, each garment is designed with structure and craftsmanship in mind before being hand-constructed in studio. The end result is a piece of clothing which transcends modern standards and is not only wearable, but could stand on it’s own as a work of fine art. This creative process, he says, is the most self-rewarding because he finds it to be the most difficult.

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