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Suspense Radio Inside Edition December 12th, 2015

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Ellen Kirschman: "The Right Wrong Thing"Officer Randy Spelling had always wanted to be a police officer, to follow in the footsteps of her brothers and her father. Not long after joining the force, she mistakenly shoots and kills Lakeisha Gibbs, a pregnant teenager. The community is outraged; Lakeisha’s family is vocal and vicious in their attacks against Spelling.  Suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder, and filled with remorse, Randy is desperate to apologize to the girl’s family.  Everyone, including the police chief, warns her against this, but the young police officer will not be dissuaded.  Her attempt is catastrophic. Dr. Dot Myerhoff, police psychologist, plunges herself into the investigation despite orders from the police chief to back off. Not only does the psychologist’s refusal to obey orders jeopardize her career, but her life as well, as she enlists unlikely allies and unconventional undercover work to expose the tangled net of Officer Spelling’s. 

Bonnie Macbird: "Art in the Blood, A Sherlock Holmes Adventure": 

London, a snowy December, 1888.  A disastrous Ripper investigation has left 35-year-old Sherlock Holmes in a deep depression and back on cocaine. The newly married Watson is summoned urgently to 221B to rouse his friend.  Nothing works until the arrival of an intriguing encoded letter from a beautiful French singer, Mlle. Emmeline La Victoire.  Her illegitimate son Emil (with the famous art collector and humanitarian Earl of Pellingham)  has disappeared and she fears him kidnapped, and she herself  has been accosted in the street.

As they travel to Paris to come to her aid, a larger picture is unveiled. This same untouchable Earl may well be behind the world’s largest art theft.

 

 

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