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BIGFOOT Expert Researcher KATHY STRAIN on Sasquatch Is Alive & Well

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Kathy Moskowitz Strain is currently the Forest Archaeologist for the Stanislaus National Forest, headquartered in Sonora, California. She is responsible for all archaeological and paleontological resources on her Forest and directs education and public participation programs on archaeology and Native American cultures. Kathy is currently the chair of the Alliance of Independent Bigfoot Researchers, a non-profit Bigfoot research group.


Kathy became interested in Bigfoot as a child, and her interest lead her into the field of anthropology. Kathy received a Bachelor of Arts degree in Anthropology in 1990 and a Master of Arts in Behavioral Science (emphasis in Anthropology) in 1994. Her main field of study involved prehistoric human ecology.

In 1991, as an archaeologist for the Sequoia National Forest, she began interviewing elders from the Yokuts Tribe about their traditional Hairy Man stories. This work lead her to an in depth study of the Hairy Man pictographs, located on the Tule River Indian reservation. She has presented her research at the 2003 Willow Creek Symposium, the 2005 Texas Bigfoot Conference, and published an article in Meet the Sasquatch, by Chris Murphy. Recently, she appeared on the Giganto: The Real King Kong special on the History Channel.

Using her specialty in human ecology, Kathy is exploring the connection between Native American adaptation of the environment and how Bigfoot might also have used similar techniques to exploit plants and animals. Comparisons may be found in habitation methods and locations, hunting and gathering techniques, resource availability, calorie input/output, seasonal movements, etc. Knowing this information may foster collection of evidence not previously associated with Bigfoot behavior. It may also allow us to develop techniques to better obtain direct observations and therefore documentation and protection of this currently unrecognized primate.

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