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How the Baby-Boom Generation Created an Anti-Christian Culture

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Baby boomers are people born during the demographic Post–World War II baby boom between the years 1946 and 1964. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the term "baby boomer" is also used in a cultural context.  Baby boomers are associated with a rejection or redefinition of traditional values.  As a group, they were the wealthiest, most active, and most physically fit generation up to that time, and amongst the first to grow up genuinely expecting the world to improve with time.  They were also the generation that received peak levels of income; therefore they could reap the benefits of abundant levels of food, apparel, retirement programs, and sometimes even "midlife crisis" products. The increased consumerism for this generation has been regularly criticized as excessive.  One feature of the boomers was that they tended to think of themselves as a special generation.  This rhetoric had an important impact in the self-perceptions of the boomers, as well as their tendency to define the world in terms of generations, which was a relatively new phenomenon. The baby boom has been described variously as a "shockwave" and as "the pig in the python.”

The term Generation Jones has sometimes been used to distinguish those born from 1957 onward from the earlier Baby Boomers.

Generation Jones is a term coined by the author Jonathan Pontell to describe the cohort of people born from approximately 1954 to 1965.  Pontell defined Generation Jones as referring to the last years of the post–World War II baby boom.  The term also includes first-wave Generation X.

The name "Generation Jones" has several connotations, including a large anonymous generation, a "keeping up with the Joneses" competitiveness and the slang word "jones" or "jonesing", meaning a yearning or craving.

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