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  • 00:31

    Part 2: The Technicolor Priestess Eyenie Schultz on Living Life in Technicolor

    in Women

    Let’s get real – you feel stuck, bored, uninspired like you’re letting LOVE, life, and opportunities pass you by.


    You are brilliant, creative, sassy, savvy, gifted and talented with incredible taste… and you know it! But you just can’t shake feeling like something must be wrong with you. Sometimes you even wondering why you’re still single if you supposedly have "so much going for you".


    How are you showing up in your world?


    You’ve likely been using clothes to hide…to tell the world, and yourself, “I don’t want to be seen…”


    But you are sick of muting yourself, shutting yourself down, staying closed off to all the things you know you desire deep down; that includes meeting your dreamboat and tag-teaming through life with them. You know the time has come to get confident and put yourself out there! But you have no idea where to begin (or what to wear!)


    That is where Eyenie Schulz comes in.


    Eyenie {pronounced eh-zje-knee}, the Technicolor Priestess. She is a Career & Style Alchemist based in France who helps career-driven Overachieving Misfits all over the world who struggle with hiding out and letting life pass them by to FIND THEIR CRAFT + CALLING, HAVE FUN, and express themselves through their kick-ass STYLE!


    Because, toots, it is possible.

  • 03:12

    Live Chat : Reggae Super stars Junior Toots,Empress Ayeola & Tuff Like Iron

    in Music

    Empress Ayeola and Nu – Edge released her new album ‘Straight To The Point’   from the ‘acclaimed fire mamma’ including songs like “Reggae Lock Di World” “Nah Mek Dem Bring Mi Down” and the title track “Straight To The Point” A very well put together album displaying her ability to relate to any issues and transform into amazing lyrical content.In 2011 came the release of ‘Stop Dem’ EP, (David Ghetto Records) great material, and her previous album on the Gaddamaweh label back in 2007 ‘Isat Innat (Fire Mamma)’ 


    Tuff Like Iron Born  1986 in NYC.  After dropping out of prestigious Columbia University, Tuff chose to follow the path of Self-reliance and began her clothing label, Tuff Like Iron. The clothing line has a far reaching star studded client base including Erykah Badu, Mos Def, Jah9, Jesse Royal and Jah Cure.In less than one year Tuff Like Iron music has already made quite the splash. Heavy hitting singles like “Talking To You” and “Keep Yuh Head Up” are  getting attention from  music lovers from California, Canada, New York, Jamaica, Trinidad and even Kenya!. Tuff Like Iron fan base has shown overwhelming support for her newly released video “Equal Rights” 


    Junior Toots, Crown of Fire, is a uniquely talented recording artist and performer whose passion for reggae is evident in his moving live performances & recordings that inspire all.Born and raised in Jamaica & the US, he has a genuine commitment to socially conscious lyrics and a determination to express himself sincerely from within. This passion can be felt through his deeply soulful vocal style that is reminiscent of his father, renowned reggae artist Toots Hibbert, of the Toots and the Maytals.With a mixture of Reggae, Roots, & Ska, Junior Toots reaches out to all supporters of conscious music.. 

  • 02:04
  • 02:00

    American Daily Review: Obamebola, Rogaine Rhymes With Cocaine & Mayor DUI

    in Politics Conservative

    Hong Kong gets more violent; Oh, yes, there were WMDs in Iraq; Unfair: Exposing The I.R.S. and other pleasant fantasies; Black Nationalism’s influence in Ferguson, Missouri; Kim Jong-Un, the disappearing, reappearing dictator; General McInerney: missing Malaysian Flight MH370 in Pakistan?; Russian dictator Vladimir Putin eyes westward advance; Lesbian Houston Mayor Annise Parker demands delivery of pastors' sermons; Obama’s Ebola Czar, Ron Klain, is unconstitutional and entirely politically reliable; Democrats smear GOP as "the party of ebola"; Ebola mess proves Obama’s incompetence - or malevolence; and Joe Biden's scion and nepot toots his way out of the Naval Reserve.
     

  • 00:12

    Shift to the Fundamental Structure of Our Program, Toot Faces!

    in Pop Culture

    We discuss subjects likes toots, poop, and life.  We dig deep.  Literally.  Into a pile of poop.  With our hands.  Pretty gross, but fun! #toots  #twofingers in air

  • 00:17

    Cruzing Sundays: Strictly Reggae Music before the 70's with KING MOHICAN

    in Music


    The history of Jamaica's music is a fascinating one, and seldom has a nation's pop music been so celebratory, political, and concerned with civil rights, all rolled into an upside-down one-drop rhythm that is as recognizable as it is pervasive. Part mento, part African drums, part American jazz, soul, and R&B, part a Marcus Garvey-derived treatise on human rights and repatriation, Jamaica's reggae is pop music with clear revolutionary goals, intent on dancing in the face of Babylon while forthrightly chanting it down. This Is Reggae Music hits most of the historical high points, including Jamaica's entry into the international pop market with early hits like Millie Small's "My Boy Lollipop" (arranged by the venerable Ernest Ranglin) and Desmond Dekker's "Israelites," following these up with key tracks from Jimmy Cliff's The Harder They Come soundtrack (including Cliff's own "Many Rivers to Cross," the Maytals' "Pressure Drop," the Melodians' "Rivers of Babylon," and the Slickers' immortal "Johnny Too Bad" and some early reggae gems like Marley's "Duppy Conqueror" (produced by Lee "Scratch" Perry), the Heptones' "Hypocrite," and Cliff's "Vietnam." The final disc finds reggae poised to take over the world (on the wings of one Bob Marley), and includes essential tracks like Delroy Wilson's "Better Must Come," Zap Pow's bit of reggae-meets-Stax, "This Is Reggae Music," Slim Smith's stunningly beautiful "The Time Has Come," and the concluding song, the classic Jack Ruby-produced "Marcus Garvey" by Burning Spear.www.crsradio.com www.caribbeanradio.com

  • 02:06

    Dee Daniels

    in Entertainment

    September 18 - Jazz Vocalist - Dee Daniels


     


    Dee Daniels’ musical career is as varied as her four-octave vocal range is thrilling. She is a unique talent who transcends musical borders when she brings her jazz styling, infused with gospel and blues flavoring, to the stage.


     


    Her vocal style was born in her stepfather’s church choir in Oakland, California, refined through the R&B era, polished during a five-year stay in The Netherlands and Belgium from 1982 to 1987, and brought to full fruition upon her return to North America. During those years to the present, she has performed and recorded with many ‘Legends of Jazz’ including Toots Thielemans, Houston Person, Clark Terry, Lionel Hampton, Monty Alexander, John Clayton, and Jeff Hamilton, Hank Jones, Bill Mays, Dennis MacKrel, Bucky Pizzarelli, Ken Peplowski, and Russell Malone - to mention a few.


     


    Dee has just released her newest project, Intimate Conversations, and it is nothing less than stellar.  Please join me and my very special guest for what I know will be an interesting, entertaining, and just a good old time! 

  • 03:56

    LIVE: Vintage Music Vibrations with KING MOHICAN on the Tower

    in Music


    The history of Jamaica's music is a fascinating one, and seldom has a nation's pop music been so celebratory, political, and concerned with civil rights, all rolled into an upside-down one-drop rhythm that is as recognizable as it is pervasive. Part mento, part African drums, part American jazz, soul, and R&B, part a Marcus Garvey-derived treatise on human rights and repatriation, Jamaica's reggae is pop music with clear revolutionary goals, intent on dancing in the face of Babylon while forthrightly chanting it down. This Is Reggae Music hits most of the historical high points, including Jamaica's entry into the international pop market with early hits like Millie Small's "My Boy Lollipop" (arranged by the venerable Ernest Ranglin) and Desmond Dekker's "Israelites," following these up with key tracks from Jimmy Cliff's The Harder They Come soundtrack (including Cliff's own "Many Rivers to Cross," the Maytals' "Pressure Drop," the Melodians' "Rivers of Babylon," and the Slickers' immortal "Johnny Too Bad" and some early reggae gems like Marley's "Duppy Conqueror" (produced by Lee "Scratch" Perry), the Heptones' "Hypocrite," and Cliff's "Vietnam." The final disc finds reggae poised to take over the world (on the wings of one Bob Marley), and includes essential tracks like Delroy Wilson's "Better Must Come," Zap Pow's bit of reggae-meets-Stax, "This Is Reggae Music," Slim Smith's stunningly beautiful "The Time Has Come," and the concluding song, the classic Jack Ruby-produced "Marcus Garvey" by Burning Spear.www.crsradio.com www.caribbeanradio.com

  • 02:51

    Cruzing Sundays: Strictly Reggae Music before the 70's with KING MOHICAN

    in Music


    The history of Jamaica's music is a fascinating one, and seldom has a nation's pop music been so celebratory, political, and concerned with civil rights, all rolled into an upside-down one-drop rhythm that is as recognizable as it is pervasive. Part mento, part African drums, part American jazz, soul, and R&B, part a Marcus Garvey-derived treatise on human rights and repatriation, Jamaica's reggae is pop music with clear revolutionary goals, intent on dancing in the face of Babylon while forthrightly chanting it down. This Is Reggae Music hits most of the historical high points, including Jamaica's entry into the international pop market with early hits like Millie Small's "My Boy Lollipop" (arranged by the venerable Ernest Ranglin) and Desmond Dekker's "Israelites," following these up with key tracks from Jimmy Cliff's The Harder They Come soundtrack (including Cliff's own "Many Rivers to Cross," the Maytals' "Pressure Drop," the Melodians' "Rivers of Babylon," and the Slickers' immortal "Johnny Too Bad" and some early reggae gems like Marley's "Duppy Conqueror" (produced by Lee "Scratch" Perry), the Heptones' "Hypocrite," and Cliff's "Vietnam." The final disc finds reggae poised to take over the world (on the wings of one Bob Marley), and includes essential tracks like Delroy Wilson's "Better Must Come," Zap Pow's bit of reggae-meets-Stax, "This Is Reggae Music," Slim Smith's stunningly beautiful "The Time Has Come," and the concluding song, the classic Jack Ruby-produced "Marcus Garvey" by Burning Spear.www.crsradio.com www.caribbeanradio.com

  • 03:48

    Cruzing Sundays:Reggae Music 40's- 70's with Special Festival Song KING MOHICAN

    in Music


    The history of Jamaica's music is a fascinating one, and seldom has a nation's pop music been so celebratory, political, and concerned with civil rights, all rolled into an upside-down one-drop rhythm that is as recognizable as it is pervasive. Part mento, part African drums, part American jazz, soul, and R&B, part a Marcus Garvey-derived treatise on human rights and repatriation, Jamaica's reggae is pop music with clear revolutionary goals, intent on dancing in the face of Babylon while forthrightly chanting it down. This Is Reggae Music hits most of the historical high points, including Jamaica's entry into the international pop market with early hits like Millie Small's "My Boy Lollipop" (arranged by the venerable Ernest Ranglin) and Desmond Dekker's "Israelites," following these up with key tracks from Jimmy Cliff's The Harder They Come soundtrack (including Cliff's own "Many Rivers to Cross," the Maytals' "Pressure Drop," the Melodians' "Rivers of Babylon," and the Slickers' immortal "Johnny Too Bad" and some early reggae gems like Marley's "Duppy Conqueror" (produced by Lee "Scratch" Perry), the Heptones' "Hypocrite," and Cliff's "Vietnam." The final disc finds reggae poised to take over the world (on the wings of one Bob Marley), and includes essential tracks like Delroy Wilson's "Better Must Come," Zap Pow's bit of reggae-meets-Stax, "This Is Reggae Music," Slim Smith's stunningly beautiful "The Time Has Come," and the concluding song, the classic Jack Ruby-produced "Marcus Garvey" by Burning Spear.www.crsradio.com www.caribbeanradio.com

  • 03:17

    Cruzing Sundays: Strictly Reggae Music before the 70's with KING MOHICAN

    in Music


    The history of Jamaica's music is a fascinating one, and seldom has a nation's pop music been so celebratory, political, and concerned with civil rights, all rolled into an upside-down one-drop rhythm that is as recognizable as it is pervasive. Part mento, part African drums, part American jazz, soul, and R&B, part a Marcus Garvey-derived treatise on human rights and repatriation, Jamaica's reggae is pop music with clear revolutionary goals, intent on dancing in the face of Babylon while forthrightly chanting it down. This Is Reggae Music hits most of the historical high points, including Jamaica's entry into the international pop market with early hits like Millie Small's "My Boy Lollipop" (arranged by the venerable Ernest Ranglin) and Desmond Dekker's "Israelites," following these up with key tracks from Jimmy Cliff's The Harder They Come soundtrack (including Cliff's own "Many Rivers to Cross," the Maytals' "Pressure Drop," the Melodians' "Rivers of Babylon," and the Slickers' immortal "Johnny Too Bad" and some early reggae gems like Marley's "Duppy Conqueror" (produced by Lee "Scratch" Perry), the Heptones' "Hypocrite," and Cliff's "Vietnam." The final disc finds reggae poised to take over the world (on the wings of one Bob Marley), and includes essential tracks like Delroy Wilson's "Better Must Come," Zap Pow's bit of reggae-meets-Stax, "This Is Reggae Music," Slim Smith's stunningly beautiful "The Time Has Come," and the concluding song, the classic Jack Ruby-produced "Marcus Garvey" by Burning Spear.www.crsradio.com www.caribbeanradio.com