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  • 02:35

    Dixon D. White on "White Racial Responsibility" & Racial Healing

    in Politics Progressive

    Quite often, there are people who can be described as "a person for a time such as this."  

    Abraham Lincoln, Frederick Douglass, Harriet Tubman, Sojourner Truth, Susan B. Anthony, Teddy Roosevelt, Rosa Parks, Eleanor Roosevelt, Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., Malcolm X and so many others come to mind. Looking back on the context of their times in history, we loft them into super human statuses and forget that they were born like the rest of us and they have died like we all will.

    What unites all of these names from our history is the common trait that they had the courage to stand up, speak up and "ACT UP!!"

    That last phrase Act Up comes from our featured guest for this episode of The #SocialSpitballShow.

    Dixon D. White is a self-described redneck and reformed racist. Dixon has many experiences to draw from to elicit truth about race, which is, in part, that we cannot ignore it away. Dixon calls on fellow White Americans to embrace their "White Racial Responsibility" to speak up and ACT UP when they see racial hurt.

    I personally love the term "Act Up" because it makes me think of a child misbehaving, but also the clever bumper sticker that says that "Well-Behaved Women Never Make History." It's true & fitting because we need to step outside of our "comfort zone" of complacency and condoning of a terrible history of racism and violence in this country.

    This history of racism and violence manifests itself as much today as in the past. Racism is not over. We need to stand up to racism. With courageous folks like Dixon White speaking up and acting up on the subject, we can be sure to bring more healing and common ground.

    Won't you tune in and hear from this amazing & inspiring man and others like him? Barbara and I are excited to get this conversation going...

  • Baltimore Riots, Freddie Gray, and Racial Profiling in America

    in Legal

    Commentary and discussion on Baltimore and racial profiling by police.

  • 00:34

    Racial Profiling

    in Spirituality

    We explore what racial profiling is and it's purpose!!!!

  • 01:12

    "Help4Men Radio Special" Racial Profiling Against Black Men in America

    in US Government

    Every African-American male in this country who drives a vehicle, or has traveled by bus or plane, either knowingly or unknowingly has been the victim of racial profiling by law enforcement officials. Indeed, African-American males are disproportionately targeted, stopped, and searched by law enforcement officials based on race and gender. Those responsible for enforcement of public laws view African-American males as criminals. Unfortunately, the American justice system has condoned, supported, and in some instances encouraged such actions by law enforcement officials to stop, arrest, prosecute, and incarcerate African-American males. On the basis of race and gender, governmental officials have devised a profile of the typical criminal: black and male.


    The term driving while black has been used to describe the practice of law enforcement officials to stop African-American drivers without probable cause. The practice particularly targets African-American males. African-American males are not only singled out while driving, but also while schooling, eating, running for political office, walking, banking, serving as a juror, getting a taxi, shopping, and just being black and a male. The mere fact of being black and male in America is sufficient cause for governmental and private law enforcement officials to abridge the rights of African-American males. This is not to suggest that law enforcement officers can never consider race when performing their job. Just the opposite, where a witness identifies the race and gender of a suspect, it is relevant evidence to consider in an effort to apprehend a criminal. Racial profiling, however, involves a pre-disposition held by law enforcement officers who are members of the majority, to believe that minorities, and particularly African-American males, are engaged in criminal activities; therefore, they are stopped and searched without probable cause or reasonable suspicion.

  • 01:03

    "Help4Men Radio Special" Equal Justice Initiative A HISTORY OF RACIAL INJUSTICE

    in US Government

    Our nation’s prison population has more than quintupled,” she said. “And this is due largely to the war on drugs and the ‘get tough’ movement. The drug war has been waged almost exclusively in poor communities of color even though studies have consistently shown now for decades that contrary to popular belief, people of color are no more likely to use or sell illegal drugs than whites, but by waging this drug war almost exclusively in poor communities of color, we’ve now created a vast new racial under-caste.”


    One hundred and fifty years after the Emancipation Proclamation, the progress made by African-Americans is undeniable–which is why statistics about incarceration in the black community can be so shocking. In 2011 there were more African-Americans in prison or “under the watch” of the justice system than were enslaved in the United .


     

  • 01:00

    The Healing Room is Bridging the Glacial Racial Gap

    in Women

    On The Healing Room this week, we're taking a look at racial differences. Those differences are old, they are cold and they are vast. But we have the love in our hearts that can melt the ice, if we allow it.


    We will discuss the teaching of Martin Luther King, Jr., as a reminder that he was not a man driven by racial differences, he was driven by a passion for Christ. He was driven by truth. Let's look back for just a moment and rekindle that passion for Christ that can heal our hearts, our church and our nation. "Darkness cannot drive out darkness: only light can do that. Hate cannot drive out hate: only love can do that."


    Visit us at Spiritual Health Source.


    Get Connected for updates on Facebook or Twitter.


    Learn more about Janiece C. Andrews, M.D.

  • 00:52

    Diversity in the Workplace: An Open Discussion - "Racial Bias" with Torin Ellis

    in Management

    ~ May Series: Diveristy in the Workplace ~


    Torin Ellis joins Rayanne and HR Latte to launch latest series: Diversity in the Workplace


    HR Latte chats with Torin Ellis, Diversity Search Maverick, Hybrid Recruiter, and Founder of "the torin ellis brand (video)" about racial bias in hiring and talent management today. Based in Baltimore, Torin is perfectly positioned to launch this series on diversity. Rayanne will ask the hard questions, the ones no one wants to ask. It's time for this conversation!


    Join us for a quick impact conversation about Diveristy in the Workplace and Racial Bias.


    HR Latte is a fast-paced, quick hit show where you can expect not only surprises but the information you need to know for success in the world of talent management.


    Follow the action on Twitter:


    Torin Ellis  - @TorinEllis
    @HRLatte
    @Ray_anne

  • 02:01

    SHOULD WE KEEP RACIAL IMAGES IN OUR WORSHIP?

    in Lifestyle

    (NOTE: Today’s March 22, 2015 is a prerecorded repeat show on racial images in worship)


    Imam W. Deen Mohammed gave us C.R.A.I.D. early in his leadership (circa 1978) and it was quite effective. C.R.A.I.D. is an acronym for “COMMITTEE for the REMOVAL of ALL IMAGES that attempt to portray the DIVINE”.


    There is Facebook discussion on racial images in worship. This noble effort is investigating the best methods for reviving CRAID. What do you think about C.R.A.I.D. in today’s world?


    Another Facebook group I manage is titled "GIVE GOD NO COLOR." (https://m.facebook.com/groups/136138373208123)


    It has been widely received and opened the following exchange: 


    ======================================================================================


    Last winter one of our Focolare friends shared with me a beautiful report. While planning for their annual "Day of Christian Unity" the company that supplies the artwork for this special day sent them a very; as she described it, "a very white American looking image of Jesus." However due to her being a part of our FB group "GIVE GOD NO COLOR" and her love for our concern she called the supply company and told them that they could not accept such an image or any racial depictions. This is very significant. We thank Allah for bringing Imam W. Deen Mohammed and the blessed lady Chiara Lubrich and their respective communities together as ONE! This is a way to advance the message of C.R.A.I.D. to an audience that we could probably never reach.


    ====================================================================================


    Join WORDS MAKE PEOPLE on Sunday March 22, 2015 as we discuss C.R.A.I.D; its history and relevancy today. (NOTE: This is a prerecorded repeat show)


     

  • 02:59

    racial stereotype's

    in Current Events

    black men who use the white supremacist racial stereotype's to attack other black's

  • 00:45

    Does Racial Inequality Still Exist in America?

    in Youth

    Prompted by recent issues in the news involving race and violence, Teen Talk explores the state of racial inequality in the United States. Hosts Dana, Domy, Kyla, and Yanira discuss this along with how the public thinks about racial issues and how to respectfully disagree with someone whose views oppose your own. Our guest is retired Syracuse City Judge Langston McKinney.


    *The views and opinions expressed in this program belong solely to the hosts and guest. They do not reflect the views and opinions of the Teen Talk program or Contact Community Services.

  • 01:41

    Racial Identity and a Colorblind Society

    in Culture

    Join Dr. Culbreth for Racial Identity and a Colorblind Society.


    Topics include:



    Colorism
    Racial Pride
    Racial identity
    The right to self-identify
    Denying ancestry and heritage
     “I am not African American I am an American”
    African American or Black American
    Historical view of “African American”
    When racial categories offend
    DNA Testing
    A Colorblind Society?