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  • 00:30

    Sacred Sunday~Romans 16/Farewell Romans!

    in Religion

    Today we read the last Chapter in Romans. Romans 16.



    The last bit of the letter consists of some shout outs to Paul's friends in Rome. Talk about name-dropping.
    There are about twenty-six names in all, but we'll just hit a few of the biggies:
    He first mentions a woman named Phoebe who Paul calls a "deacon." She's probably the person who is carrying his letter from Corinth to Rome.
    There's a married couple—Prisca and Aquilla—who have stuck their necks out for Paul lots of times.
    And Andronicus and Junia, a Jewish couple who were in prison with Paul and whom he calls "prominent among the apostles."
    Then Paul takes a break from his "hellos" to drop in a warning: watch out for false prophets. They don't follow Christ and they're only out for themselves. They're pretty good at tricking people into following them, though. So—eternal vigilance!
    Back to greetings! Paul puts in a few hiyas from the folks in Corinth. Timothy, Lucius, Jason, Sosipater, Tertius, Gaius, Erastus, and Quartus all say hello.
    Lastly, Paul gives one final shout out to God. He brings strength to all Christians through the good news of Jesus Christ.He has revealed a super-secret mystery to us so that now everyone—Jew and Gentile—can share in his Godly goodness.
    Amen and done! A big thank you to those at www.shmoops.com!

  • 01:57

    LIVE Celebrity Link- Jamaican DeeJays of the 70s 80s 90s & their contribution

    in Music

    Deejay (alternatively spelled DJ) is a term in Jamaican music for a reggae or dancehall musician who sings and "toasts" to an instrumental riddim.


    Deejays are not to be confused with disc jockeys from other music genres like hip-hop, where they select and play music. Dancehall/reggae DJs who select riddims to play are called selectors. Deejays who are more likely to sing are sometimes called singjays.


    The term deejay came about as a result of the act of some selectors (as they were called) of the 60s and 70s such as U-Roy or King Stitt toasting to the version side of popular records of the time. The version came about when the record company produced the 45 record with the song, the flip side of which had the instrumental version of the song. This gave the deejays the chance to make up on-the-fly lyrics to the instrumental music. This occurrence gave rise to deejay toasting and the term has been used in that context ever since.

  • 00:41

    RodneyKendrick

    in Music

    Rodney Kenrdick was born in 1960 into a family of musicians. His father, James “Jimmy Kay” Kendrick was a noted musician with Illinois Jacquet, Sonny Stitt, Lou Donaldson, and Sam Rivers. Duke Ellington and Thelonius Monk inspire him. Kendrick’s unique percussive and harmonic piano style of classic jazz piano, 70’s funk, and gospel, his first instrument was the drums.  All but his two sisters, on both sides of his family played an instrument and sang.  After high-school, he traveled the world with James Brown, George Clinton, and Harold Melvin & the Blues Notes. He lives in NY and has dedicated his life to a study Black American Classical Music. Barry Harris remains his teacher and mentor, exposing him to Charlie Parker, Bud Powell, and Chris Anderson and their unique perspectives on musical improvisation. Kendrick is a leader on six albums and sideman on countless others. He worked George Benson, Freddie Hubbard, Clark Terry, Frank Morgan, Terence Blanchard, J.J. Johnson and Stanley Turrentine and served as musical leader for Abbey Lincoln for seven years. Since 2004, Rodney produced several albums, including Thank You (2002), Randy Weston & Rodney Kendrick: Duo Piano For My Friend, a duo-piano piece with mentor Randy Weston (2004), with wife of 10 years Rhonda Ross Live (2001), and with his father, Jimmy Kay Black is Back (2006). Discography: The Secrets Of Rodney Kendrick; Dance, World, Dance (1994) Dance, World, Dance (1995) Last Chance For Common Sense (1996) We Don’t Die, We Multiply (1997) No Dress Code (1998). The Colors of Rhythm (Impulse! 2014) featuring Curtis Lundy (b) and Cindy Blackman (d).


    Thank You! by Rodney Kendrick


    www.wijsf.org


     

  • 00:35

    Preparing for an Amazing School Year!

    in Women

    Well Summer Vacation has come to an end, time to send your little ones, children, teens, back to school. Time to get back into routines, time for learning to take place. Yes it's time for homework, test, quizzes, making new friends and so much more. Join us for a discussion on how to make this the most amazing school year for your scholar. It all starts with a plan and remaining consistent. Join us Wednesday September 3, 2014 at 5:30pm est. by logging on to www.blogtalkradio.com/wowinspiration or dial in to listen 718-664-6996. Let's prepare our youth to become World Changers!!!

  • 01:59

    The Celebrity Link- Jamaica DANCE HALL DJ OF THE 1970S

    in Music

    Visiting the Jamaican dancehall of the 1970 and paying tribute to some of the DJs that made their contributions


    Deejay (alternatively spelled DJ) is a term in Jamaican music for a reggae or dancehall musician who sings and "toasts" to an instrumental riddim (rhythm).


    Deejays are not to be confused with disc jockeys from other music genres like hip-hop, where they select and play music. Dancehall/reggae DJs who select riddims to play are called selectors. Deejays who are more likely to sing are sometimes called singjays.


    The term deejay came about as a result of the act of some selectors (as they were called) of the 60s and 70s such as U-Roy or King Stitt toasting to the version side of popular records of the time. The version came about when the record company produced the 45 record with the song, the flip side of which had the instrumental version of the song. This gave the deejays the chance to make up on-the-fly lyrics to the instrumental music. This occurrence gave rise to deejay toasting and the term has been used in that context ever since.
    Toasting


    Toasting, chatting, or deejaying is the act of talking or chanting, usually in a monotone melody, over a rhythm or beat by a deejay. Traditionally, the method of toasting originates from the griots of Caribbean calypso and mento tradition.[1] The lyrics can be either be improvised or pre-written.


    Toasting has been used in various African traditions, such as griots chanting over a drum beat, as well as in Jamaican music forms, such as Ska, reggae, dancehall, and dub. Toasting is also often used in soca and bouyon music. Toasting's mix of talking and chanting may have influenced the development of MCing in US hip hop music. The combination of singing and toasting is known as singjaying. more here http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Deejay_%28Jamaican%29


     


    www.crsradio.com caribbeanradioshow@gmail.com 661-467-2407


     

  • 00:14
  • 00:59

    MyNDTALK with Dr. Pamela Brewer - One Magnigificent Musical Life :Katea Stitt

    in Music

    ONE MAGNIFICENT MUSICAL LIFE – A  Special radio program series ,MyNDTALK with Dr. Pamela Brewer aired January 20, 2012 on WPFW 89.3 FM , Washington, DC. The Series focused on the vast and tireless talents of music programmers.  Those people, behind the scenes, who work so hard, educate so much and are often unsung in their own right.
    This episode features Katea Stitt , daughter of famed jazz saxophonist Sonny Stitt – is one such person.  How fitting that Katea would bring her spirit and talents to the only remaining Jazz station, WPFW  in the Washington, DC metro.
    Katea’s own quiet beauty, passion for the music of her father and African peoples worldwide, vast musical experiences and knowledge shine through in this hour long interview.
     
    Host: Pamela Brewer
    Producer: Jim Brown

  • 00:13

    PODCAST: SourceFire and Indicators of Compromise

    in Technology

    Welcome to the Federal Technology Insider Podcast series.  Today we are speaking with Tom Stitt, Director of Product Marketing at Sourcefire about Indicators of compromise or better known as IoCs.

  • 02:00

    Guest: Erik Stitt

    in Paranormal

     
    After a long Holiday break Nicole and I return with one of the most mind blowing guests we could have on The Mind Cemetery. Erik Stitt is a writer, philosophizer and paranormal enthusist that has produced a very thouht provoking book, that is if your not dead. I say that because there is something in his book that will rock your senses and send you mind into a spin making you question everything.
    The book is called The Psychoterrestrial Theory: Are you the Trickster?
    His website is Psychoterrestial.com, which we highly recommend you visit.

  • 00:23

    Celebrity Chat _Jazz Talking Blues

    in Entertainment

    Presenting black history month a chat with legendary jazz musician ARCHIE ALLEYNE on the contributions Blacks made to Jazz in Canada.
    ARCHIE ALLEYNE (drummer, bandleader) was born Archibald Alexander Alleyne on January 7, 1933 in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. From largely self-taught beginnings, he soared to future and current legendary status during the years after launching his playing career in the early ‘50s. A familiar sight – and sound – as the resident drummer at the famous Town Tavern for more than a decade from 1955 to 1966. Alleyne became the drummer-of-choice for visiting jazz stars including Sonnie Stitt, Billie Holiday, Stan Getz, Bud Freeman, Coleman Hawkins, Ben Webster, and Lester Young.

  • 00:23

    Celebrity Chat - jazz talking blues

    in Entertainment

    Presenting black history month a chat with legendary jazz musician JOE SEALY on the contributions Blacks made to Jazz in Canada.
    Joe (Joseph Arthur) Sealy. Pianist, organist, composer, actor, b Montreal 16 Aug 1939. In his youth he studied piano with Daisy Peterson Sweeney, Professor Boyce, and Bob Langlois in Montreal; later he was pupil of Darwyn Aitken in Toronto. Sealy began his career during the late 1950s in jazz groups and/or show bands with René Thomas, Bob Rudd, Benny Winestone, Walter Bacon, and others throughout Quebec.
    In 1976 Sealy went to Toronto where he has worked extended engagements in jazz rooms and lounges (eg, intermittently 1980-3 at Errol's) and served as musical director for a succession of musicals through the 1980s, including Spring Thaw, Indigo, Ain't Misbehavin', More Sweet Reason, One More Stop, Madame Gertrude and Lady Day at Emerson's Bar and Grill, taking acting roles in several.
    Sealy has written scores and/or songs for TV and film, and several themes for jazz group. Of the latter, Sealy has recorded Early Morning Blues, Dumpling, Clear Vision, Playa Caliente, Fat Cat and Distant Shores. An efficient jazz pianist whose style continues to show the influence of his early models, Oscar Peterson and Horace Silver, he has accompanied several leading US musicians in their Canadian appearances, including Buddy DeFranco, Milt Jackson, Sonny Stitt, and Joe Williams at Pepe's in Halifax. In 1979 he toured with David Clayton-Thomas and Blood, Sweat & Tears.