• 01:00

    Exploring the Houmas House Plantation & New Orleans history

    in Travel

    Today's show will find World Footprints traveling to the crown jewel of Louisiana's River Road, revisiting a dark chapter in American history, and uncovering the best that New Orleans has to offer.


    The Houmas House in Darrow, Louisiana is an antebellus plantation and sister property of the famous Greenbrier Resort in Virginia.  This historical jewel sits between New Orleans and Baton Rouge and contains a treasure trove of history within its walls.  We were pleased to spend a day with the planation's colorful owner, entrepreneur Kevin Kelly and learn what he is doing to preserve Houmas House as a living history and decorative arts showcase.


    Then, the greatest act of slave resistance in American history took place in 1811 just outside of New Orleans and has remained largely untold, until now.  Author Daniel Rasmussen joins us to discuss his book, American Uprising: The Untold Story of America's Largest Slave Revolt, and shed new light on the great American paradox--slavery.


    Finally, native New Orleanian and travel writer Laura Martone is the author of the Moon Travel Guide to New Orleans and she stops by to offer an insider's guide to the best that New Orleans has to offer.

  • 01:38

    Marching Back To The Plantation

    in Real Estate

    Today on "It's My House" we shall discuss an very important issue or (concept) that was put on the table by Mr. Warren Houston of "Know Thyself Radio" and "The Peoples Law Study Group".  That issue is:


    Marching Back To The Plantation.


    Warren shall give us a factual history lesson and then connect the dots to see where  many people have fallen backwards, by being mis-educated and never learning certain parts of history. By knowing what really happened (historically) we can then take corrective action and prosper.

  • 01:57

    Unmarried Men With Many Women And Children: The Modern Plantation Stud?

    in Women

    The modern welfare system seems to have resurrected a pattern of behavior that was designed to destroy emotional ties between men, women and children in order to breed human beings for sale on the market. The plantation stud. Back in slavery times, this was a virile young man assigned by the plantation owner to have sex with a female chosen by the plantation owner in order to impregnate her. Once she was pregnant, the stud was then reassigned to another female, to have sex with her until she became pregnant. This business, known as "slave breeding" became popular once the United States outlawed the importation of Africans on slave ships. Without new arrivals, plantation owners had to create a system of breeding children for farm workers or for sale by creating an emotionally detached sexual relationship between enslaved men and women. This way, fathers would have no bond with their children, they often didn't know which children were theirs. The enslavedmen lost the instinct to protect and provide for a family, they were conditioned to be only driven by sex. They would therefore offer no resistance when the child or the mother was sold, beaten, or otherwise abused as a slave. Is the modern day phenomenon of emotionally detached men with multiple women and children a resurrection of the plantation stud? How do we correct this destruction of our family cultural values?

  • 02:05

    Paranormal Kool-Aid Proudly Presents The Rippavilla Plantation Experience

    in Paranormal

    Paranormal Talk Radio


    The Rippavilla Plantation is an amazing location in Spring Hill Tennessee. The fantastic history of The Nathaniel Cheairs home reads like a historical romance novel. Upon returning from the Civil War, Nathaniel found southern carpetbaggers had thrown his wife and children out of their home and the interlopers were living in the mansion. Nathaniel and his men forced the bad guys out of the home at gun point and took the property back! This year, they are holding a speciasl event called WHISPERS OF THE PAST and will be commemorating its 150th anniversary during the reenactment of The Battle of Spring Hill in November. Join us as we talk with the owners and with people who have actively investigated the haunted history.


    Take a sip of the Kool-Aid! What's your flavor?


    Discussions on Paranormal Phenomena: Ghost/Spirits, Psychics/Mediums, Hauntings, Demonic Possession, Ufology, Alien Abduction, Time Travel, NDE's, Bigfoot/Sasquatch, Conspiracies & All Things Unexplained.


    Website: http://www.paranormalkoolaid.com/
    Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ParanormalKoolAid
    Twitter: @ParaKool
    Stitcher: http://www.stitcher.com/podcast/paranormal-koolaid
    iTunes: Search Paranormal Kool-Aid in the iTunes Store.
    YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/user/pkaradio
    Email us with your Questions & Suggestions: pkaradio@gmail.com


    Listen LIVE or talk to our Hosts & Guests: 1-646-929-2384


    Paranormal Kool Aid Radio is brought to you by Belinda Clarke-Ache, April Abercrombie, Cara Davidson, Rabbi Sid Vineberg, Victor Cruz, Dawn Gomez, Scott Gruenwald, and Chris Medina. OHHH YEAHHH!!!!! YYEAHHHH!!!!

  • 01:00

    Exploring Laura Plantation and Faubourg

    in Travel

    Louisana's Creole culture and a famed New Orleans' neighborhood share the spotlight on today's show.  Our Creole cultural exploration takes us just outside New Orleans to the Old Mississippe River Road where we'll share the story of a Creole family and a plantation named Laura--voted "Best history tour in the USA" by Lonely Planet Travel and a top travel attraction in Louisiana.  Laura Plantation, named after Laura Locoul Gore, is an old sugarcane plantation over 200 years old.  We experienced life on the plantation as a member of the Locoul family through the voice of one of Laura's decendents, Norman Marmillion. 


    We will also visit Faubourg Treme with filmmaker Dawn Logsdon.  Treme is considered the oldest black neighborhood in America and the birthplace of the civil rights movement in the South.  Treme is a place where African-Americans lived free during slavery and became a place of social and economic diversity.

  • The Half Has Never Been Told with Edward E. Baptist, Ph.D.

    in History

    The Half Has Never Been Told: Slavery and the Making of American Capitalism


    Historian Edward E. Baptist reveals in The Half Has Never Been Told, the expansion of slavery in the first eight decades after American independence drove the evolution and modernization of the United States. In the span of a single lifetime, the South grew from a narrow coastal strip of worn-out tobacco plantations to a continental cotton empire, and the United States grew into a modern, industrial, and capitalist economy. Until the Civil War, Baptist explains, the most important American economic innovations were ways to make slavery ever more profitable. Through forced migration and torture, slave owners extracted continual increases in efficiency from enslaved African Americans. Thus the United States seized control of the world market for cotton, the key raw material of the Industrial Revolution, and became a wealthy nation with global influence.


    Told through intimate slave narratives, plantation records, newspapers, and the words of politicians, entrepreneurs, and escaped slaves, The Half Has Never Been Told offers a radical new interpretation of American history. It forces readers to reckon with the violence at the root of American supremacy, but also with the survival and resistance that brought about slavery’s end—and created a culture that sustains America’s deepest dreams of freedom.


    Edward E. Baptist is an Associate Professor in the Department of History and House Professor and Dean at the Carl Becker House at Cornell University.


     


     


     

  • 00:36

    Super Power Hour: Sydney, Broward Politics, Miami Dolphins Meltdown Edition

    in Comedy

    JOIN THE CONVERSATION LIVE 10pm as we discuss the Sydney Hostage siege, Broward politics, the Miami Dolphins loss, the homeless fight, the Winterfest boat parade, Jeb Bush and Common Core, republicans, democrats, ferguson, I cant breathe, protests and more

  • 01:59

    The Plantation Mentality

    in Current Events

    Sports, Social Media, Entertainment, and the NEWS...We've all seen the controversy, Someone makes comments that spark some level of outrage. But are we really surprised? Are we really expecting others to believe that we are living in a post racial society? How do we address the Plantation Mentality of not just sports owners but those who look like us but defend them?

  • 00:30

    Racism Hid Behind Rose Colored Glasses in America, 1964~2008

    in Politics

    America is into rose color glasses. Americans only want to see certain things in certain ways. It may be OK to pretend we are not 50 pounds over weight. We can just buy a larger size of the same outfit. Then we don't have to face the truth. Is it never OK to wear rose colored glasses when it is about our own health and well being. It is not OK when it harms society. This country was once was young, but now we are old. America is old enough to have fixed broken from centuries ago. It is time for America face the facts of our history and grow up. Repent and fix the mistakes past and present. This is the only way we all can begin to heal. America was the land of the Indians. Whites immigrated to America and stole America from Indians. White sea Captains stole Africans and brought them to America to sell to plantation owners to use as free labor. Africans that survived the trip to America were beat into submission to obey White men. Animals and Africans had basically the same value. Property of White men. Africans were stripped of their language to prevent plotting to escape. Africans were property of Whites until 1865. Africans were freed, yet freedom for many lead to sharecropping on some of the same plantations where they slaved in bondage. When Black begin to use their skills to produce and make money, Black code laws were put in place to keep Blacks dependent on Whites. Immigrants entering America were blended into the social order of the country, putting immigrants above Africans. Africans by now were viewed very negatively by all. African either submitted to being characterized as nothing, or they were beat brutally or hung by the neck until dead and left to be seen by all other Africans who dared to not accept racism in America. After the Civil Rights Act of 1965 racism put on rose colored glasses. 2008, the glasses come off.

  • 02:20

    Talk about it Tuesday with Professor James Small

    in Spirituality

    Thanks for hanging out in the Goddess Suite, Tune in 9pm for Talk about it Tuesday show, sip a cup of conscious tea and get ready for the HOTTEST 2 HOURS of your life! CALL IN @ 516-453-9075 


    Professor James Small is a Pan Africanist, Black Scholar and Transformational Speaker.  He is a Priest of Oya and Babalorisha in the Ifa Tradition.  


    Professor James Small was born in 1945, on Arcadia plantation, located on the banks of the Waccamaw River. This Lowland rice plantation is located where the Waccamaw, Peedee, and Black Rivers converge to meet the Atlantic Ocean, on the shores of historic Georgetown, South Carolina. Prof. Small was born to a family that traces their descent from enslaved Africans, to the Yoruba, Akan, and Ewe people of West Africa. Prof. Small's heritage also stems from the Native American ancestors that inhabited these South Carolinian shores. Both his maternal great-grandmother and his paternal great-grandmother were members of the Chicora Nation, and made their home along the mighty Waccamaw River.


    Prof. Small taught for nearly twenty years at the City University of New York, including 17 years at the City College of New York's Black Studies Department, thirteen of those years also serving as an administrator and two years at New York City Technical College. Prof. Small has taught courses on Malcolm X, Traditional African Religion (Prof. Small is a priest in the Yoruba religion), Pan Africanism, Crime in the Urban Community, Urban Crisis and Issues, and African Folklore. 


    Prof. Small is currently conducting educational and cultural tours throughout Africa and the United States and he is also working on two books, one a collection of his lectures on Malcolm X and the other on the topic of "Post Slavery Trauma Syndrome."


     

  • 00:30

    Reader's Entertainment Radio Presents: Piper Huguley

    in Books

    Be sure to tune in Thursday, December 4th at 6pm EST.  My guest for the evening will be Piper Huguley, author of the Reconstruction era "Home to Milford College" series.  Her multi-award nominated inspirational historical romances feature intriguing African American characters. The Lawyer's Luck and The Preacher's Promise from her “Home to Milford College” series, are Amazon best sellers.  The Mayor’s Mission, is next novel in the series.


    Book Blurb:


    1866 – Oberlin, Ohio/ Milford, Georgia Devastated by her father’s death days after her triumphant graduation from Oberlin College, Amanda Stewart is all alone in the world. Her father’s unscrupulous business partner offers her an indecent proposal to earn a living. Instead, to fulfill a promise she made to her father, she resolves to start a school to educate and uplift their race. Sorting through her father’s papers, she discovers he had carried on a mysterious correspondence with a plantation in Milford, Georgia. She determines to start her teaching work with the formerly enslaved. However, when she arrives, the mayor tells her to leave. There’s no where for her to go. Virgil Smithson, Milford’s mayor, blacksmith and sometimes preacher man with a gift for fiery oratory, doesn’t want anything to do with a snobby schoolteacher from up North. On top of everything else, the schoolteacher lady has a will hard enough to match the iron he forges.  To reflect God’s promise, these combatants must put aside their differences and come together--somehow.


     


     

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