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  • Author, Miranda Parker

    in Books

    Author of The Evangeline Hunter Bounty Series, Miranda Parker, discusses her novel, "A Good Excuse to Be Bad".

  • 01:57

    Military Mamas Radio Show Discusses The News

    in Military

    Military Mamas Radio Show hosts discuss the news.

  • 01:14

    Military Monday Replay with John D. Gresham & USNI Author Capt. Alfred McLaren

    in History

    It is ofter forgotten that just 60 years ago, man knew more about the surface of the moon than about was under the artic icecap. Then, with the coming of nuclear powered submarines in the late 1950's, the U.S. Navy began to explore and operate under the polar ice pack, and the Cold War took a new and deadly turn. Following his graduation from the United States Naval Academy in Annapolis, Maryland in 1955, Alfred McLaren took a career path that would make him one of the greatest Arctic explorers of all time. Following a tour aboard USS Greenfish (SS 351), Maclaren moved over to his first nuclear powered submarine, USS Seadragon (SSN 584), and began a career of Arctic exploration that has made him a household name in the field. This culminated in the late 1960s when he was part of the commissioning crew of USS Queenfish (SSN 651), which he later commanded on a landmark under ice survey of the Siberian Continental Shelf. His Arctic explorations, along with many other Cold War missions and patrols, made Capt. McLaren something of a living legend within the " Silent Service," which he remains today.


    To learn more about Capt. McLaren, the submarines that he served on, and his explorations/missions during his years of service on American submarines, join best-selling author, historian, journalist, documentary filmmaker, and radio host John D. Gresham (Greshamj01) for Military Monday (#MilitaryMonday on the Writestream Radio Network (@Writestream)) at 1 PM EDT. This week John will be interviewing U.S. Naval Institute Press (@USNIBooks) author and submariner Capt. Alfred McLaren about his submarine career, and his new book, SILENT AND UNSEEN, a memoir of his naval career. So please tun in to hear the interview of a memorable explorer and Cold Warrior.

  • 01:20

    Military Monday Replay With John D. Gresham and Author Barrett Tillman

    in History

    Because of a guest scheduling problem, we will be replaying my interview with Reginery History author Barrett Tillman. A longtime friend and frequent guest, you should find my interview from last year with him both interesting and extremely thoughtful. His recent book, FORGOTTEN FIFTEENTH, about the World War II Fifteenth Air Force in the Mediterranean Theater, has earned both critical praise and excellent reviews. So tune in one more time at 1 PM EDT to listen to this well spoken and thoughtful gentleman talk about one of the most  interesting and least known episodes of World War II.

  • 01:59

    Military Monday With John D. Gresham and Zenith Press Author Phil Keith

    in History

    USS Lexington (CV 2), along with her sister ship, USS Saratoga (CV 3), were America's first real aircraft carriers, and genuine wonders of the world we were commissioned in the late 1920s. Converted from a pair of battlecruiser hulls made surplus by the Washington Naval Treaty, the two ships were the largest, most powerful, and fastest warships in the world. Able to carry and operate up to 90 aircraft, twice as many as any of the contemporary British and Japanese aircraft carriers, Lexington and her sister ship were the platforms where the U.S. Navy learned to take airpower out to sea. But Lexington was more than just a ship, for she also was a home and a schoolhouse for the men who served aboard her. As American's aircraft carrier fleet grew prior to World War II, Lexington and her sister were the ships where the men who would crew those new carriers learned their trades. In addition, some of the U.S. Navy's greatest leaders in World War II were captains aboard the Lexington, including Adm. Ernest J. King and Rear Adm. Forrest Sherman. And even though Lexington was lost at the Battle of the Coral Sea in May 1942, her loss taught critical damage control lessons that are still used today.


    To learn more about "Lady Lex," tune in at 1 PM EDT for Military Monday (#MilitaryMonday on the Writestream Radio Network (@Writestream)) hosted by author, historian, journalist and documentary filmmaker John D. Gresham (@greshamj01). John's guest this week is Zenith Press (@Zenith_Press) author Phil Keith, who has written a new book, STAY THE RISING SUN, chronicles the story of the Lexington to her sinking in the Coral Sea.

  • 00:23

    Military Author Jenny La Sala

    in Education

    Listen to my exclusive interview with military author Jenny La Sala. Jenny is very passionate at getting the stories of veterans out and preserving our history. Visit Jenny La Sala's Author Page AUTHOR'S BOOKS: http://www.amazon.com/Jenny-La-Sala/e/B00NR36UYM/ref=ntt_dp_epwbk_0.


    http://comesasoldierswhisper.com/


    Follow Me On Twitter @ngusolutionsnet

  • 01:05

    Military Monday with John D. Gresham With USNI Press Author Benjamin Armstrong

    in History

    In 2013, Benjamin F. "BJ" Armstrong, a career naval officer and aviator, wrote/edited the book 21ST CENTURY MAHAN, published by the U.S. Naval Institute Press (USNI Press – @USNIBooks). Widely reviewed and extremely well received, the book was based upon the premise that the ideas presented in the writings of American seapower theorist Alfred Thayer Mahan were still relevant in the 21st century, more than a century after the publication of his seminal work, THE INFLUANCE OF SEAPOWER UPON HISTORY. Armstrongs book revived a lively discussion about the relevance and merits of seapower in the present day, and the idea that the tenets Mahan put forth in the late 1800s, were still relevant in a world being defined by new technologies and emerging world powers.


    Now, in 2015, Armstrong has published a new book in what has become USNI Press's emerging "21st Century" series of books with 21ST CENTURY SIMS, based upon the career and writings of Adm. William Sims. A true among the naval leaders of the early 20th century, Sims is less well known for his vast published works on naval leadership, particularly as they apply to junior officers. Now Mr. Armstrong has collected and edited them, in a compact work that provides new insights into this fascinating military personality from a century ago.


    This week, Benjamin Armstrong joins author, historian, journalist, and documentary filmmaker John D. Gresham (@greshamj01) on Military Monday (#MilitaryMonday on the Writestream Radio Network (@Writestream)) to talk about his new book, along with his editorship of the new "21st Century" book series for USNI Press. This should be a lively hour of history, books, and publishing, and listeners are invited to call in and discuss their ideas and questions with both gentlemen.

  • 01:57

    Military Mamas Radio Show News and Views

    in Military

    Carrie and Joe discuss current news and views.

  • 01:09

    Military Monday With John D. Gresham and Author Mike Haskew – Appomattox

    in Lifestyle

    As the 150th Anniversary of the Civil War winds down, there are still some important events that enthusiasts and historians are looking forward to. Arguably, one of the most important was the showdown between the Union Army of the Potomac, and Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee's Army of Northern Virginia. What had begun in 1864 at the Battle of the Wilderness, had turned into the bloody Overland Campaign that had ended with the two armies facing off near the town of Petersburg, Virginia. There both sides had dug in, and a monotonous trench warfare reminiscent of World War I had developed. And despite occasional Union attempts to break the Confederate trench lines, the stalemate had prevailed through early 1865. There, in March and April, the Union forces finally managed to break out, beginning a desperate race by both armies into Southwestern Virginia. For weeks the pursuit continued, with Gen. Ulysses S. Grant's forces gradually encircling Lee's Army. Finally, at Appomattox Court House, the pursuit ended, and Gen. Lee conceded defeat. It was the beginning of the end of America's bloodiest war, one that still touches us deeply.


     To learn more about the Appomattox Campaign, please tune in to Military Monday (#MilitaryMonday on the Writestream Radio Network (@Writestream)) hosted by best-selling author, historian, journalist, game designer, and documentary filmmaker John D. Gresham (@greshamj01). His guest this week will be respected Zenith Press (@Zenith_Press) author and historian Mike Haskew. Mr. Haskew is the author of the new book APPOMATTOX, a single volume history of the campaign that ended the American Civil War. Mr. Haskew will describe the nuances of the campaign, including many of the personal stories and background that are rarely told outside the historian community. Listeners are encouraged to call in, and offer questions and comments on this fascinating final military campaign of America's bloodiest war.

  • 01:33

    Military Monday with John D. Gresham With USNI Press Author Dwight R, Messimer

    in History

    It is a sociological and historic fact that the defining moment for the present generation of Americans, were the terrorist attacks of 9/11. But as devastating as the attacks of September 11th, 2001 were in terms of lives lost and property destroyed, they were hardly the first use of terrorist/unconventional warfare on American soil during our history. However, this quaint notion that our time is somehow different from the past is so wrong that it is positively laughable. As early as the American Civil War over 150 years ago, agents from the Confederate intelligence services sought to burn down large sections of New York City with "Greek Fire" pyrotechnics. And during World War I, the United States of America was the target of what was arguably the largest and best structured terrorist campaign in our history. Run by German Army and Naval Intelligence in a joint operation, the effort ran three extremely successful sabotage cells on the eastern seaboard and Gulf Coast, along with supporting a clandestine cargo submarine-based shipping line to bring raw materials through the British blockade back to the Fatherland. In addition, these cells and their controlling agency back in Germany were also complicit in a number of security operations, and even had a hand in the famous "Zimmerman Telegram" incident.


    The sabotage cell based in Baltimore is the subject of this week's edition of Military Monday (#MilitaryMonday on the Writestream Radio Netwok (@Writestream)). Tune in today at 1 PM EDT as bestselling author, journalist, documentary film producer, and host John D. Gresham talks with U.S. Naval Institute Press (@USNI_Books) author Dwight R. Messimer. Mr. Messimer is the author of the new book THE BALTIMORE SABOTAGE CELL, a compelling story of vast destruction by Germany against America.


     


     

  • 01:15

    Military Monday with John D. Gresham With Author RADM Dave Oliver, USN (Ret.)

    in Lifestyle

    Of all the human qualities that are desired by people here in America and around the world right now, there can be little doubt or question that leadership is at the top of that list. Diluted by decades of indifference and mediocrity since the days of the "Greatest Generation" that fought in World War II, leadership as become a quality as rare as 100-carat diamonds and honest politicians. Nevertheless, those of us with long memories do recall touchstone individuals who not only made a difference in their time, but changed the very world they were part of forever. One of these was a somewhat gnomish and often disliked naval officer who created a whole new technology and era literally through the force of his own will: Adm. Hyman G. Rickover, USN.


    Today, Rickover remains something of an enigma to military historians and analysts almost 3 decades after his death. Arguably one of the most brilliant and powerful naval officers of his day, he never commanded great ships and fleets in battle. Able to make other officers and politicians sweat and fear for their professional lives, his actual job for most of his career was to build engines for submarines and surface ships. And while his nuclear engines changed the history of the world, at no time did he ever command a ship powered by one. To learn more about this important figure in U.S. history, join author, historian, journalist, game designer, and documentary filmmaker John D. Gresham (@Greshamj01) for Military Monday (#MilitaryMonday on the Writestream Radio Network (@Writestream)) at 1 PM EDT. His guest this week will be U.S. Naval Institute Press (@USNI_Books) author and career submariner RADM Dave Oliver, USN (Ret.). Oliver is the author of the new book AGAINST THE TIDE, a biographical study of Rickover and his unique leadership and management styles.