• 00:31

    Pt 2. Close-Up Talk Radio's Jim Masters interviews Dr. Alison Caldwell-Andrews

    in Health

    Middlefield, CT – Many people hold long-term beliefs about themselves. For example, one of these beliefs might be that no matter what they do, they’re not enough. They’re stuck looking down at a bottomless pool, frantically trying to fill it up, but no matter what they do, it’s never full.


    According to Dr. Alison Caldwell-Andrews, the solution is that you simply walk away from the pool. Rather than frantically continue to try to fill the pool, change your behaviors to instead do the things that create the kind of life you want.


    Dr. Caldwell-Andrews is a licensed clinical psychologist and expert in mind-body health. As a former member of the research faculty focused on Mind-Body Medicine at the Yale University School of Medicine, Dr. Caldwell-Andrews employs a data-driven, holistic approach to therapy.


    “Insight alone is not a catalyst for change," explains Dr. Caldwell-Andrews. "Feelings are like the caboose on the end of a train. The engine is your behavior. You have to change your behavior first and the feelings will follow along.”


    So as a part of evaluating depression, Dr. Caldwell-Andrews will ask about a person's diet, sleep and exercise. All these things are relevant to a person’s state of mind. According to Dr. Caldwell-Andrews, exercise is one of the most effective means of reducing anxiety and depression. Studies show that exercise actually creates new brain cells as well as brain derived neurotropic factor (BDNF), which nourishes brain cells and brain connectivity.


    “The world you create through your thinking prevents you from changing your behavior,” says Dr. Caldwell-Andrews. “I push people’s boundaries because I want them to have a different neurotransmitter experience in their brain. Often no therapist has ever done this for them before and I’m 100% committed to them getting the message.”

  • 00:31

    Close-Up Talk Radio Welcomes Back Dr. Alison Caldwell-Andrews

    in Health

    Middlefield, CT – Many people hold long-term beliefs about themselves. For example, one of these beliefs might be that no matter what they do, they’re not enough. They’re stuck looking down at a bottomless pool, frantically trying to fill it up, but no matter what they do, it’s never full.


    According to Dr. Alison Caldwell-Andrews, the solution is that you simply walk away from the pool. Rather than frantically continue to try to fill the pool, change your behaviors to instead do the things that create the kind of life you want.


    Dr. Caldwell-Andrews is a licensed clinical psychologist and expert in mind-body health. As a former member of the research faculty focused on Mind-Body Medicine at the Yale University School of Medicine, Dr. Caldwell-Andrews employs a data-driven, holistic approach to therapy.


    “Insight alone is not a catalyst for change," explains Dr. Caldwell-Andrews. "Feelings are like the caboose on the end of a train. The engine is your behavior. You have to change your behavior first and the feelings will follow along.”


    So as a part of evaluating depression, Dr. Caldwell-Andrews will ask about a person's diet, sleep and exercise. All these things are relevant to a person’s state of mind. According to Dr. Caldwell-Andrews, exercise is one of the most effective means of reducing anxiety and depression. Studies show that exercise actually creates new brain cells as well as brain derived neurotropic factor (BDNF), which nourishes brain cells and brain connectivity.


    “The world you create through your thinking prevents you from changing your behavior,” says Dr. Caldwell-Andrews. “I push people’s boundaries because I want them to have a different neurotransmitter experience in their brain. Often no therapist has ever done this for them before and I’m 100% committed to them getting the message.”

  • 00:31

    Close-Up Talk Radio welcomes back Dr. Alison Caldwell-Andrews

    in Psychology

    Middlefield, CT – You can’t help your mind if your body is suffering. If you’re not eating right, sleeping right and exercising, you’re not able to heal, body or mind.


    As a former member of research faculty focused in Mind-Body Medicine at the Yale University School of Medicine, Dr. Alison Caldwell-Andrews studied the depths of the mind-body connection. Today, Dr. Caldwell-Andrews is a licensed clinical psychologist, dialectical behavioral therapist and an expert in mind-body health.


    “It’s crucial to improve how you eat, sleep and exercise because the literature shows how deeply those things are connected to your mental health,” says Dr. Caldwell-Andrews. “The reason I include these things in therapy is because there is data that indicates this is appropriate and it works.”


    Dr. Caldwell-Andrews specializes in what she describes as “sensitive people,” people who experience difficulty handling their emotions. Dr. Caldwell-Andrews employs a holistic approach to therapy to help her patients understand that their sensitivity can be a tremendous asset, not a source of pain in their life.


    “We love insight, but the problem is insight alone doesn’t bring about change,” explains Dr. Caldwell-Andrews. “When you change your behavior, you find that your feelings follow change too. Working on creating behavior change is key to what I do.”


    According to Dr. Caldwell-Andrews, creating change is more than a mental process. Change requires nourishing and disciplining the brain, as well as behavioral practice.


    “When I see people change and make gains, it makes me so happy,” says Dr. Caldwell-Andrews. “I love working with people and watching them change and grapple with problems and really get in a dirty fight with it. You don’t have to run away from it. We can do it together.”

  • 00:30

    Close-Up Talk Radio spotlights Dr. Alison Caldwell-Andrews

    in Psychology

    Middlefield, CT – You can’t help your mind if your body is suffering. If you’re not eating right, sleeping right and exercising, you’re not able to heal, body or mind.
    As a former member of research faculty focused in Mind-Body Medicine at the Yale University School of Medicine, Dr. Alison Caldwell-Andrews studied the depths of the mind-body connection. Today, Dr. Caldwell-Andrews is a licensed clinical psychologist, dialectical behavioral therapist and an expert in mind-body health.
    “It’s crucial to improve how you eat, sleep and exercise because the literature shows how deeply those things are connected to your mental health,” says Dr. Caldwell-Andrews. “The reason I include these things in therapy is because there is data that indicates this is appropriate and it works.”
    Dr. Caldwell-Andrews specializes in what she describes as “sensitive people,” people who experience difficulty handling their emotions. Dr. Caldwell-Andrews employs a holistic approach to therapy to help her patients understand that their sensitivity can be a tremendous asset, not a source of pain in their life.
    “We love insight, but the problem is insight alone doesn’t bring about change,” explains Dr. Caldwell-Andrews. “When you change your behavior, you find that your feelings follow change too. Working on creating behavior change is key to what I do.”
    According to Dr. Caldwell-Andrews, creating change is more than a mental process. Change requires nourishing and disciplining the brain, as well as behavioral practice.
    “When I see people change and make gains, it makes me so happy,” says Dr. Caldwell-Andrews. “I love working with people and watching them change and grapple with problems and really get in a dirty fight with it. You don’t have to run away from it. We can do it together.”

  • 01:00

    Stars: 90 - Cleveland City Stars Radio Show

    in Sports

    Chase Neidig and Rob Ivory bring their audience an in-depth look at Cleveland's professional soccer team, Cleveland City Stars. With interviews, game analysis and weekly soccer news from across the USL and the city of Cleveland, you won't want to miss a minute of S:90.

  • 01:00

    Stars: 90 - Cleveland City Stars Radio Show

    in Sports

    Chase Neidig and Rob Ivory bring their audience an in-depth look at Cleveland's professional soccer team, Cleveland City Stars. With interviews, game analysis and weekly soccer news from across the USL and the city of Cleveland, you won't want to miss a minute of S:90.

  • 01:00

    Stars: 90 - Cleveland City Stars Radio Show

    in Sports

    Chase Neidig and Rob Ivory bring their audience an in-depth look at Cleveland's professional soccer team, Cleveland City Stars. With interviews, game analysis and weekly soccer news from across the USL and the city of Cleveland, you won't want to miss a minute of S:90.

  • 01:00

    Stars:90- Cleveland City Stars Show

    in Sports

    Chase Neidig and Rob Ivory bring their audience an in-depth look at Cleveland's professional soccer team, Cleveland City Stars. With interviews, game analysis and weekly soccer news from across the USL and the city of Cleveland, you won't want to miss a minute of S:90.

  • 01:00
  • 02:00

    Wanda's Picks

    in Art

    Ajuan Mance, Associate Professor, English
    Aurelia Henry Reinhardt Chair, at Mills College, author and visual artist. African American literature, 19th-century American literature, U.S. popular culture, the oral tradition in U.S. literature, Black feminist thought, African American art, Black on Campus. She, James Gayles & Karen Seneferu are a part of an exhibit at the Women's Cancer Resource Center,“Body & Soul.” The exhibit located at 5741 Telegraph Avenue,Oakland, CA 94609, (510) 420-7900 x 111, and curated by Margo Mercedes Rivera-Weiss, opens April 17, 7-9 p.m. and continues through May 6. Jetaun Maxwell, founder of Dance Theatre of the Gospel, has a new work, "Invisible Womb," on stage April 3-4, 7 p.m. and Sunday, 3 p.m. Saturday there is an artist panel and Sunday is an audience talk back with the Jetaun Maxwell. The show runs an hour, without intermission at Bay Area Christian Connection, 810 Clay Street in Old Oakland. For information call and visit: (510)350-8327 and www.phoenixaudiovisualarts.com. The show closes with an interview with "Mississippi" Charles Bevel, currently appearing in, "It Ain't Nothin' But the Blues," at TheatreWork's Lucie Stern Theatre, 1305 Middlefield Rd., Palo Alto. Visit www.theatreworks.org or call (650) 903-6000. The show runs Tuesday-Sunday and closes April 11. Some shows have audience talk backs.


  • 00:15

    Marty in the Morning Show - Sunday Brunch Music from 1978

    in Food

    Snowed in at the Sunday Brunch, played records from 1978 and had some corned beef hash, waffels, and smoked salmon, yummy.

    Todays songs

    Link only works on this shows main page

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