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  • 01:16


    in Entertainment



  • 00:10

    Soccer Star Eddie Pope: "Life is Too Short to Live Without God...." (GLM #180)

    in Soccer

    He is a retired American soccer player. He last played for Real Salt Lake of Major League Soccer. Although he spent eleven years as a defender for the United States national team, he spent most of his career playing for D.C. United. In 2011, he was inducted into the National Soccer Hall of Fame. In 1998, he helped United win both the Confederation of North, Central American and Caribbean Association Football Champions Cup and the InterAmerican Cup. In 1997, he was named the MLS Defender of the Year. 

    He said of his faith, "I grew up going to church every Sunday with my family. Although church was meaningful to me, it soon became more of a routine than a heartfelt faith. That began to change during my freshman year at the University of North Carolina. I was playing both soccer and football. It was a grueling time because I had two practices a day for each sport I was playing. It wasn’t long before I was exhausted. Then a teammate gave me a card that contained some Psalms from the Bible. They made a lot of sense to me. They also provided me with the peace and strength I needed to get through each day."

    He went on to say, "I came to realize that God is a 'personal' God. His Word can be applied in every situation. I also realized it was time to quit going through the motions, to stop treating my relationship with God as a routine and to start making it the foundation of my life. So, in a strange way, soccer has forced me to develop a relationship with God. It’s the best thing that has ever happened to me. With all the traveling and being away from family, having God as part of my daily routine is essential—even though He is anything but routine. Life is too short to live without God. He is a necessity."

    His name is Eddie Pope.

  • 00:11

    Actor David Oyelowo says "Being a Christian Has Been Invaluable" (GLM #179)

    in Movies

    He is a British-Nigerian actor who is known for several movie roles. He won a scholarship to the London Academy of Music and Dramatic Art and finished his training in 1998. He played  supporting roles in the films "The Last King of Scotland", "Rise of the Planet of the Apes", "Jack Reacher", "Middle of Nowhere", "The Paperboy", and "Lincoln". He also earned high praise for portraying Louis Gaines in "The Butler". His TV roles include, "Spooks", "A Raisin in the Sun", and "Star Wars: Rebels." He stars as Martin Luther King, Jr. in the biographical drama film "Selma", for which he received a nomination for a Golden Globe Award for Best Actor in a Motion Picture Drama.

    In an interview with the Telegraph UK, he is described as having an unwaveringness about him which can be ascribed to his Christian faith. He said, "my faith is a very visceral, conversational one that bleeds into everything. I was brought up as a Baptist. By 16 I was ready to leave church behind. It was a time when  my hormones were raging and I was nursing a nice rebellious streak. I decided to try a different church for three months and God turned up in a dramatic way. From then on my behaviour and decisions have been driven by my faith. 

    As a devout Christian, he often prays on film sets. For the movie "Selma", he said he heard a voice tell him that he would play the role of Martin Luther King, Jr. In an interview with The L.A. Times, he said, "I knew that voice [of God], because it was the same voice that told me to marry my wife, the same voice that told me to give names to my children before they were even conceived. This is how God has spoken to me in the past. And it's what kept me going even though directors at the time didn't want me."


    His name is David Oyelowo.

  • 00:10

    Luke Ridnour: 'Only My Relationship with God Gives Me True Peace' (GLM #178)

    in Basketball

    He is a professional basketball player who currently plays as point guard for the Orlando Magic of the NBA. He played college basketball at the University of Oregon, where he helped to take the Ducks to the NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament twice. He was picked 14th in the 2003 NBA Draft by the Seattle SuperSonics. He has played for the Milwaukee Bucks, the Minnesota Timberwolves, the Milwaukee Bucks, and the Charlotte Bobcats. 

    He said of his faith, "2 Corinthians 4:18 says, 'So we fix our eyes not on what is seen, but on what is unseen. For what is seen is temporary, but what is unseen is eternal.' After spending the first part of my life thinking basketball was the be-all, end-all of my existence, this verse finally put things into perspective. Throughout high school, basketball was my life. I didn’t want to be known for anything other than my accomplishments on the court. But even though I was blessed with many achievements and rewards, I still didn’t have peace. The problem was, basketball was just a game; but I was treating it like it was a god. It wasn’t until college that I was finally able to see this clearly. As much as I enjoyed the game, there was no way basketball could ever give me the lasting sense of fulfillment and meaning I craved. The only one who could provide those things was God. That truth has become even more real to me since entering the NBA. Even though I now have more success, fame, and money than I ever dreamed, my relationship with God is the only thing that brings me true peace and satisfaction."

    His name is Luke Ridnour.

  • 00:10

    San Francisco Giants' Bobby Evans On his Relationship with Christ (GLM #171)

    in Baseball

    He is the assistant general manager for the San Francisco Giants. He played an important role in helping the organization win two World Series titles in 2010 and 2012. He also assisted the Giants in being named the Topps Organization of the Year in both 2009 and 2011 and the Baseball America Organization of the Year in 2010. Along with negotiating all major league player contracts, he helps to acquire free agents and signing minor league talent. In 2012, he received the Bowie Kuhn Award, which is presented annually to an individual, team or organization which demonstrates support of the chapel program in professional baseball.

    He became a Christian at 7-years-old and for the past 21 years, he has been a faithful member of First Baptist Church in San Francisco. He has served on the leadership board of First Baptist for 18 years, and he makes worship attendance with his family a priority.

    In an interview with the Baptist Press, he said of his faith, "You want your life to point people to Christ. It starts for me with my own relationship with Christ. That's going to direct and dictate what influence I have for Christ in my family, in my marriage and in the workplace. In baseball, as in other businesses, following Jesus and being a faithful church member is hard, but it's going to all start with where I am in my relationship with Christ."

    His name is Bobby Evans.

  • 00:12

    Jen Lilley: 'I Would Rather Not be an Actor and Be in God's Will' (GLM #168)

    in Television

    She is an actress best known for her TV roles including her portrayal of Maxie Jones on the ABC soap opera "General Hospital" from 2011 to 2012. In 2013, she joined the cast of "Days of Our Lives" as Theresa Donovan, and starred in "The Book of Esther" portraying the biblical character. Her other film and television credits include "Revelation Road," "Crossing Streets," "Criminal Minds," and "iCarly" among others. 

    In an interview with the Christian Post, she spoke about leaving "General Hospital" and how her faith in God guides her to make the right decisions. About leaving General Hospital, she said, "It was definitely a really scary and challenging experience...[However] At the end of the day we know that our battle is not against flesh and blood. You have to hold your head high and have grace.... I'm actually really excited to be off of 'General Hospital' because I know God orders my steps, and this only means He has a new adventure for me. I pursue God on a daily basis, I'm not stepping into oblivion. 

    On turning down a role in a major motion picture, she said, "I remember reading the script and being like, 'I can't do this as a Christian for a lot of reasons. One being that it is a horror movie. I like psychological thrillers but when it's demonic, there's no uplifting message. The first person (in the script) to die was a child. I'm a huge advocate of children's rights. They kept saying God is dead, God doesn't exist. I would rather not be an actor and be in God's will."

    As a child, she witnessed her mother pray for Jesus to heal her brother from a debilitating disease while he was still in her womb. Though he was delivered still-born and had stopped breathing for a few minutes, she maintains that her mother's prayers and laying hands on him brought him back to life...

  • 00:12

    Major League Baseball Pitcher, Billy Wagner: Sold-Out to God (GLM #116)

    in Baseball

    He is a former major league baseball relief pitcher. Nicknamed "Billy the Kid", he pitched for the Houston Astros from 1995 to 2003, the Philadelphia Phillies from 2004 to 2005, the New York Mets from 2006 to 2009, the Boston Red Sox in 2009, and the Atlanta Braves in 2010. He is one of the few relief pitchers with a total of 400 saves in his career. In 2012, he was inducted into the Virginia Sports Hall of Fame. 

    Though he was born right-handed, after breaking his right arm twice in accidents as a child, he taught himself to throw baseballs using his left arm. Raised in his grandparent's Christian home, he accepted Jesus Christ into his life at age 12. In an interview with CBN, he said, "I was saved when I was, I believe I was 12 years old. My grandparents had that kind of work ethic and religion and faith that kinda kept me on track."

    When he began playing with his left arm, he said, "God has given me a left arm that has given me a pedestal to be someone that can help [people] better themselves in the faith. Being a Christian I’ve been able to sit there and say [that] this is a learning experience. I said some things when I was out on the mound, I acted in a way when I was out on the mound that is not what God had wanted, but being able to be forgiven and to repent shows that that is what being a Christian is all about."

    "Baseball is just fantasy. It’s a short-lived life, and I have a long life with God. That’s most important, and if I take that for granted, everything that He has graced me with, He can take away. God wants you to be competitive for Him too, so being competitive is the easy part. It’s the balance of knowing who you are and what you want to be. Once I realized as an athlete what was important and what wasn’t, then, I think you’re able to sell out to God."

    His name is Billy Wagner.

  • 00:13

    Bear Grylls: Faith in Christ 'is the Backbone of My Life' (GLM #161)

    in Religion

    He is a British adventurer, writer and television presenter.  He is best known for his television series Man vs. Wild. He is a part of a number of television series in the United Kingdom and the United States on the theme of survival in the wild. In 1997, he became the youngest Briton to climb Ama Dablam in the Himalayas. And in 1998, he became one of the youngest people ever to climb to the summit of Mount Everest. In July 2009, he was appointed the youngest-ever Chief Scout at the age of 35.

    In an interview with Relevant Magazine, he said of his faith: "I had a very natural faith as a kid. As a really young kid, I never questioned God. I just knew God existed and it felt like He was my friend. Faith has been and is the backbone of my life."

    "I remember having one moment when some really good friends turned their back on me in a really nasty way. And I remember praying a simple prayer up a tree one evening and saying, 'God, if you're like I knew you as a kid, would you be that friend again?' And it was no more complicated than that. And actually the amazing thing is that all God asks is that we sort of open the door and He'll do the rest. So often we kinda hide behind our yearning for love and acceptance with loads of complicated theological questions, and actually once that's stripped away what we really are is just somebody who wants to have that relationship with your Father."

    "Jesus never said, 'I've come so you can feel smart and proper and smiley and religious.' [Faith] is about finding life and joy and peace. I am not at church a lot because I'm away a lot, so I kind of cling to the simple things, like, 'I can do all things through Christ who strengthens me' and 'I'm holding you by your right hand.' The simple things are what I try to keep my faith like. Jesus is unchanging and we are forgiven."



  • 00:09

    Bryan Davis: "To Have a Relationship with Christ is to Have Enough" (GLM #159)

    in Religion

    He is a professional basketball player who played college basketball at Texas A&M University. He played for the San Antonio Spurs in the Summer of 2010 before signing with a Polish team for the rest of the season. During this same year, he was named to the Big 12 All-Defensive Team as well as the All-Big 12 Third Team. In 2011, he signed with the GasTerra Flames of the Netherlands and was named a PLK All-Star. From 2012 to 2013, he played for teams in the Ukraine, China, and South Korea. In 2014, he signed with the Wellington Saints in New Zealand and was named a New Zealand National Basketball League champion.

    He said of his faith, "There have been times in my life that I was told that I could not achieve something, and at those times I have looked to my favorite lifeline from the Bible: 'I can do all things through Christ who strengthens me.' This promise from Philippians 4:13 has guided me and energized me. It reminds me that I can face any life challenge with Jesus Christ. Therefore, to have a relationship with Christ is to have enough. I attribute my success to my faith in God and our relationship, and my strong family values [from the Bible]. And I always hold close to this folk proverb: The smarter a man is, the more he needs God to protect him from thinking he knows everything."

    His name is Bryan Davis.

  • Shetaut Neter - GL Meditation with Asar Khnum Khepera

    in Spirituality

    Meditation is the discipline of inward attention that leads one to discover the essential nature of Self...which is our own true essence, and which is abiding happiness and peace. The focus of this meditation series will be on the Glorious Light Meditation (GLM ) which focuses on the identification of the self with the Kemetic (Egyptian) creator, Ra.  With the GLM meditation you will be taught how to focus and control your concentration.  During this series,  the myth associated with the GLM, the words of power and the visualization associated with this meditation will be discussed.

  • 00:12

    Tim Brown: "Our Single Purpose on this Earth is to Serve God" (GLM #152)

    in Football

    He is a former NFL wide receiver. He played college football for Notre Dame, where he won the Heisman Trophy in 1987, becoming the first wide receiver to win the award. He played for the Los Angeles/Oakland Raiders for 16 years from 1988–2003, and later played with the Tampa Bay Buccaneers in 2004. He was selected to the Pro Bowl 9 times, made the AP Second-Team All-Pro, and was selected to the PFW All-Conference 6 times. He won the NCAA Silver Anniversary Award in 2012. He was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame in 2009. He is the only player ever to retire in the NFL's top five leaders for both receiving and return yards. In both 2012 and 2013, he was selected as a finalist for enshrinement in the Pro Football Hall of Fame. He is currently a college football analyst for ESPN.
    In an interview with Game Plan for Life, he spoke about his Christian faith. Even though He grew up in the church as a child and was taught the ways of the Lord primarily by his mother, he slacked off from following God in college and in his early days in the NFL. He said, "Even though I had all of that good teaching, it doesn’t mean that I was living the way I was suppose to live. At the University of Notre Dame and my early years at the Raiders, I was ashamed of how I was living. I remember one day, I think I was 23 or 24 years old, I looked at myself in the mirror, and I couldn’t stand the person that I was looking at. I knew that I wasn’t doing what God wanted me to do....I was around 27 or 28 when I finally said it was time for me to live right. I had been given all of the teachings. I knew what I needed to do. It was just a matter of making those tough decisions."