• 00:30

    Curtis Harwell Discusses Why There Is No Such Thing as Spot Reducing

    in Fitness

    The attempt to spot-reduce body fat. It should be dead and buried, but it lives on. It’s a pursuit that just doesn’t go away. Consumer ignorance, keen marketing, and blind faith keep it alive, but past research shows it’s impossible.


     


    It’s time to add one more nail to the coffin.


     


    For those of you who are not familiar, spot reduction means the attempt to remove subcutaneous body fat stores from specific areas of the body by performing exercises that target those areas. In example, a person who has an inordinate amount of fat stored on their sides above the hips ("love handles") may use a side-bend or an abdominal side-to-side twisting exercise in the attempt to torch those fat cells. By now we should know the reality of this endeavor. Performing those exercises may strengthen the muscular responsible for those movements, but they have negligible impact on reducing the amount of fat stored there, all other factors being equal.

  • 00:30

    Curtis Harwell Discusses What Supplements are Best For Your Muscles

    in Fitness

    Priority #1: Whey Protein Powder


    Why it made the list: Whey tops the list of mass-gain supplements because it's the most crucial for pushing protein synthesis. Whey is a milk protein that has a high level of branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs, No. 4 on our list). Bottom line: Whey takes the crown because it digests fast and gets to your muscles rapidly to start building muscle. Whey also contains peptides (small proteins) that increase blood flow to the muscles. This is why we always recommend consuming whey protein immediately after training.


    How to maximize its effects: Take 20 grams of whey protein powder in the 30 minutes before working out, and take 40 grams within 60 minutes after training. Also consider taking 20-40 grams of whey immediately upon waking every morning to kick-start muscle growth. Your best bet is to choose a whey powder that contains whey protein hydrolysates (whey protein broken down into smaller fragments for faster digestion) or whey protein isolate.

  • 00:25

    Curtis Harwell Discusses Why I Cant look Like A Fitness Model 365 Days A Year

    in Fitness

    So how do some people do it? I am not sure actually. I do know that REAL fitness models have to eat strict all the time and when they have shoots they go SUPER strict. Even they go up and down but on a high level. They have to workout hours a day but it’s their job. And they make $ from it. Is it worth it for me to continue working out that many hours a day to maintain this look? Maybe if it were my job, I’d do it.If I were just a normal person, I don’t think I would. It really is a lot of work and I honestly feel like you need to get paid to put yourself through this!


    Also, bikini and fitness competitors all have a competition weight and an off season weight. Everyone has one. Curtis says we need to find mine too. It’s just not natural or safe to stay so low in body fat and weight all year round. He said that when he was competing he’d go up 20-30lbs in the off season and then just shed back down when it was time to hit the stage


     

  • 00:31

    Curtis Harwell Discusses Why Carbohydrates are not the Devil

    in Fitness

    Carbs can help boost your mood.


    Researchers suspect that carbs promote the production of serotonin, a feel-good brain chemical. In a study from the Archives of Internal Medicine, people who followed a very low carbohydrate diet for a year—which allowed only 20 to 40 grams of carbs daily, about the amount in just 1⁄2 cup of rice plus one piece of bread—experienced more depression, anxiety and anger than those assigned to a low-fat, high-carb diet that focused on low-fat dairy, whole grains, fruit and beans.


    Reason 2: Carbs can help prevent weight gain—and even promote weight loss.


     

  • 00:30

    Curtis Harwell Discusses Clenbuterol The Dirty Little Secret

    in Fitness

    Clenbuterol Short-term Side-effects


    The short-term side-effects of clenbuterol in humans have largely been determined through accidental overdoses from eating clenbuterol-tainted meat. Short-term side-effects include the following:



    Muscle crams
    Hypertension (increased blood pressure)
    Increased heart rate
    Palpitations
    Insomnia
    Dry mouth
    Vomiting
    Tremors (shakiness especially marked in hands)
    Anxiety
    Nervousness/ restlessness
    Headaches
    Breathing difficulties
    Sweating


    Most of the above side-effects diminish when clenbuterol has been expelled from the body. However, the long-term effects of clenbuterol in humans are less well understood.


    There are no human drug safety tests and information is obtained from incidents such as those in Spain in 1994, when 140 people were reportedly hospitalized and in China in September 2006 in which 330 people were poisoned due to eating meat that had been contaminated with clenbuterol. Information is also gained from isolated case studies of those using clenbuterol for its weight loss effects.

  • 00:14

    Cardinal Edward M. Egan

    in Christianity

    In this episode, blogger Sacerdotus speaks on the life of Cardinal Edward Michael Egan, Archbishop Emeritus of New York.  He gives a brief summary of his life, priesthood and work in the Catholic Church.  The Cardinal passed away on March 5, 2015 after having a cardiac arrest.  May he rest in peace. Farewell friend!  


     


    Images are from Google images.  Those watermarked www.sacerdotus.com are personal photos Sacerdotus took of the Cardinal.

  • 00:30

    Curtis Harwell Discusses Why Carbohydrates are not the Devil Part 2

    in Fitness

    What are saccharides?


    Saccharides, or carbohydrates, are sugars or starches. Saccharides consist of two basic compounds: aldehydes (composed of double-bonded carbon and oxygen atoms, plus a hydrogen atom), and keytones (composed of double-bonded carbon and oxygen atoms, plus two additional carbon atoms).


    There are various types of saccharides, including monosaccharides, disaccharides, and polysaccharides.


    Monosaccharides


    This is the smallest possible sugar unit. Examples include glucose, galactose or fructose. When we talk about blood sugar we are referring to glucose in the blood; glucose is a major source of energy for a cell.2 In human nutrition, galactose can be found most readily in milk and dairy products, while fructose is found mostly in vegetables and fruit.


    When monosaccharides merge together in linked groups they are known as polysaccharides.


    Disaccharides


    Two monosaccharide molecules bonded together. Disaccharides are polysaccharides - "poly..." specifies any number higher than one, while "di..." specifies exactly two. Examples of disaccharides include lactose, maltose, and sucrose. If you bond one glucose molecule with a fructose molecule you get a sucrose molecule.


    Sucrose is found in table sugar, and is often formed as a result of photosynthesis (sunlight absorbed by chlorophyll reacting with other compounds in plants). If you bond one glucose molecule with a galactose molecule you get lactose, which is commonly found in milk.

  • 00:31

    Curtis Harwell Discusses, Why are Women Not Eating Enough Protein?

    in Fitness

    The Paleo Diet. Protein powder. Half-pound burgers.  In case you haven't noticed, our culture has become obsessed with consuming protein—which means few of us are skimping on the stuff. "We aren't known as a country that's low in protein," says Dawn Jackson Blatner, R.D., author of The Flexitarian Diet. "These days, most of the hot fad diets are very pro-protein."
     
    But despite our national preoccupation with protein, some of us are still slipping through the cracks—namely vegetarians or people who tend to under-eat, says Blatner. Problem is, it can be tricky to identify what's considered "not enough" since the recommended intake of protein is a broad range, rather than one hard number.  "If somebody is eating a 2,000-calorie diet, it could be 50 grams to 150 grams of protein per day," says Blatner. (Things like activity level and weight influence where your ideal intake falls.)
     

  • 00:46

    The Takeover of Midian! The Edward X. Young Invasion!!!

    in Entertainment

    WARNING!!! WARNING!!! The takeover of Midian has begun! This week on The Road To Midian we are changing things up a bit. On this weeks episode our cohost and actor/special make-up effects artist, director Edward X. Young is taking control of the airwaves and hosting the show. Usual host director/writer/producer Cameron Scott will be the special guest. This will be an unusual turn as Cameron takes the hard hits and questions this time around. This is the Red Flag Nation where no subject is taboo and censorship has no dominion. Join us!

  • 00:31

    Curtis Harwell Discusses Is Being Gluten Free Worth The Effort and Cost

    in Fitness

    What is Gluten, and Why is it In My Food?


    Gluten is a combination of proteins found in most grains, such as wheat, barley, and rye. Gluten traps water and air in a foam as bread rises, which gives it a chewy, soft, moist texture.


    Wheat is the most common source of gluten for most people. However, gluten is also used as a filler in many processed/prepackaged foods, like ketchup and salad dressing. Unless you’ve been actively trying to avoid gluten, you’ve probably been eating it almost every day. Some people think that’s a bad idea.


    Why People Think Gluten Is Bad for You


    Most of the arguments against gluten can be traced back to the idea that it increases intestinal permeability or gives you a “leaky gut.”(1-5) In a nutshell:



    Gluten enters your small intestine.
    The gluten molecules irritate and attack your epithelial cells (the ones on the inside of your small intestines).
    This irritation causes your tight junctions — the space between your intestinal cells — to widen. In some cases, gluten also directly attacks your cells.
    Gluten, bacteria, and undigested food particles sneak through these gaps between your cells and into your bloodstream.
    Once gluten and friends enter your bloodstream, your body mounts an inflammatory response.
    This inflammation spreads throughout your body, wreaking havoc on your health.

  • 01:58

    The Dr. Pat Show-TalkRadio to Thrive By!

    in Spirituality

    The Dr. Pat Show: Tame Your Inner Critic Find Peace and Contentment to Live Your Life On Purpose with Author Della Temple. Quiet the mind chatter and become your own best friend. She will discuss her new book, Tame Your Inner Critic and teach us how to finally quiet that voice of self-doubt and unworthiness. Learn to treat yourself with as much kindness as you shower unto others.


    The Dr. Pat Show: Love Never Dies - How to Reconnect and Make Peace with the Deceased with Author Dr. Jamie Turndorf.  Internationally famous relationship therapist, bestselling author, and media personality, Dr. Jamie Turndorf (aka Dr. Love) shares the amazing true story of her spiritual reconnection with her beloved deceased husband, internationally renowned former Jesuit priest, Emile Pin. Discovering for herself that relationships don't end in death, Dr. Turndorf has created her groundbreaking new Trans-Dimensional Grief Therapy method that brings her acclaimed conflict-resolution method to the world of death communication. The result:  An unprecedented new method that enables the bereaved to reconnect, heal unfinished business, and make peace with the deceased.

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