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  • 00:52

    Black Reconstruction #LaShawnAllenMuhammad 323.927.2913

    in Business

    Hosted By: LaShawn Allen-Muhammad


    Who were the first Black Elected Officials? During the month of November, as the country gears up to re-elect or vote in the next wave of politicians, Black Reconstruction will revisit the Reconstruction era to pay homage to the Black Men who came before Obama.  During this tumultuous time, Blacks not only established townships, they also positioned themselves to be an integral part of government.   


    At a Glance.. In 1855, Brownhelm Township, founded by Col. Henry Brown,  gained notoriety throughout the U.S, when the township elected an African-American to government office.  The NY Syracuse Daily Journal, May 31, 1855 reported that John Mercer Langston was a fugitive slave who had been elected clerk.  Brownhelm's early residents had long been known for their strong anti-slavery stance; and Col. Henry Brown's home on the Lake Shore was often a final stop on the Underground Railroad, before reaching Canada by boat.    African-American Firsts: Government


    Local elected official: John Mercer Langston, 1855, town clerk of Brownhelm Township, Ohio.


    State elected official: Alexander Lucius Twilight, 1836, the Vermont legislature.


    Governor (appointed): P.B.S. Pinchback served as governor of Louisiana from Dec. 9, 1872-Jan. 13, 1873, during impeachment proceedings against the elected governor.


    U.S. Representative: Joseph Rainey became a Congressman from South Carolina in 1870 and was reelected four more times. 


    U.S. Senator: Hiram Revels became Senator from Mississippi from Feb. 25, 1870, to March 4, 1871, during Reconstruction.  


    There have only been a total of five black senators in U.S. history: the remaining two are Blanche K. Bruce [1875-1881] and Barack Obama 

  • 00:56

    Black Reconstruction #LaShawnAllenMuhammad 323.927.2913

    in Business

    Hosted By: LaShawn Allen-Muhammad


    Who were the first Black Elected Officials? During the month of November, as the country gears up to re-elect or vote in the next wave of politicians, Black Reconstruction will revisit the Reconstruction era to pay homage to the Black Men who came before Obama.  During this tumultuous time, Blacks not only established townships, they also positioned themselves to be an integral part of government.   


    At a Glance.. In 1855, Brownhelm Township, founded by Col. Henry Brown,  gained notoriety throughout the U.S, when the township elected an African-American to government office.  The NY Syracuse Daily Journal, May 31, 1855 reported that John Mercer Langston was a fugitive slave who had been elected clerk.  Brownhelm's early residents had long been known for their strong anti-slavery stance; and Col. Henry Brown's home on the Lake Shore was often a final stop on the Underground Railroad, before reaching Canada by boat.    African-American Firsts: Government


    Local elected official: John Mercer Langston, 1855, town clerk of Brownhelm Township, Ohio.


    State elected official: Alexander Lucius Twilight, 1836, the Vermont legislature.


    Governor  (appointed): P.B.S. Pinchback served as governor of Louisiana from Dec. 9, 1872-Jan. 13, 1873, during impeachment proceedings against the elected governor.


    U.S. Representative: Joseph Rainey became a Congressman from South Carolina in 1870 and was reelected four more times. 


    U.S. Senator: Hiram Revels became Senator from Mississippi from Feb. 25, 1870, to March 4, 1871, during Reconstruction.  


    There have only been a total of five black senators in U.S. history: the remaining two are Blanche K. Bruce [1875-1881] and Barack Obama 

  • Black Reconstruction #LaShawnAllenMuhammad 323.927.2913

    in Business

    Hosted By: LaShawn Allen-Muhammad


    Who were the first Black Elected Officials? During the month of November, as the country gears up to re-elect or vote in the next wave of politicians, Black Reconstruction will revisit the Reconstruction era to pay homage to the Black Men who came before Obama.  During this tumultuous time, Blacks not only established townships, they also positioned themselves to be an integral part of government.   


    At a Glance.. In 1855, Brownhelm Township, founded by Col. Henry Brown,  gained notoriety throughout the U.S, when the township elected an African-American to government office.  The NY Syracuse Daily Journal, May 31, 1855 reported that John Mercer Langston was a fugitive slave who had been elected clerk.  Brownhelm's early residents had long been known for their strong anti-slavery stance; and Col. Henry Brown's home on the Lake Shore was often a final stop on the Underground Railroad, before reaching Canada by boat.    African-American Firsts: Government


    Local elected official: John Mercer Langston, 1855, town clerk of Brownhelm Township, Ohio.


    State elected official: Alexander Lucius Twilight, 1836, the Vermont legislature.


    Governor (appointed): P.B.S. Pinchback served as governor of Louisiana from Dec. 9, 1872-Jan. 13, 1873, during impeachment proceedings against the elected governor.


    U.S. Representative: Joseph Rainey became a Congressman from South Carolina in 1870 and was reelected four more times. 


    U.S. Senator: Hiram Revels became Senator from Mississippi from Feb. 25, 1870, to March 4, 1871, during Reconstruction.  


    There have only been a total of five black senators in U.S. history: the remaining two are Blanche K. Bruce [1875-1881] and Barack Obama 

  • Black Reconstruction #LaShawnAllenMuhammad 323.927.2913

    in Business

    Hosted By: LaShawn Allen-Muhammad


    Who were the first Black Elected Officials? During the month of November, as the country gears up to re-elect or vote in the next wave of politicians, Black Reconstruction will revisit the Reconstruction era to pay homage to the Black Men who came before Obama.  During this tumultuous time, Blacks not only established townships, they also positioned themselves to be an integral part of government.   


    At a Glance.. In 1855, Brownhelm Township, founded by Col. Henry Brown,  gained notoriety throughout the U.S, when the township elected an African-American to government office.  The NY Syracuse Daily Journal, May 31, 1855 reported that John Mercer Langston was a fugitive slave who had been elected clerk.  Brownhelm's early residents had long been known for their strong anti-slavery stance; and Col. Henry Brown's home on the Lake Shore was often a final stop on the Underground Railroad, before reaching Canada by boat.    African-American Firsts: Government


    Local elected official: John Mercer Langston, 1855, town clerk of Brownhelm Township, Ohio.


    State elected official: Alexander Lucius Twilight, 1836, the Vermont legislature.


    Governor (appointed): P.B.S. Pinchback served as governor of Louisiana from Dec. 9, 1872-Jan. 13, 1873, during impeachment proceedings against the elected governor.


    U.S. Representative: Joseph Rainey became a Congressman from South Carolina in 1870 and was reelected four more times. 


    U.S. Senator: Hiram Revels became Senator from Mississippi from Feb. 25, 1870, to March 4, 1871, during Reconstruction.  


    There have only been a total of five black senators in U.S. history: the remaining two are Blanche K. Bruce [1875-1881] and Barack Obama 

  • 00:47

    Did God Create the Devil?

    in Christianity

    Where did the devil come from? How did such a creature come to be? Did God purposefully create an evil being? The Bible reveals the answers to these questions. They can help us understand why Satan really is the enemy of mankind. To understand Satan’s origin, we must go far back in time, before man existed. Genesis 1:1 tells us that “in the beginning God created the heavens and the earth.” However, as is usually the case, the Bible doesn’t tell the whole story in one or even several verses. We find more details elsewhere in the Bible, in this case in the book of Job. When Job, beset with terrible calamity and suffering in spite of being a very devout follower of God, began to question God’s judgment

  • 00:42

    Is There Really a Devil? The Enemy of Mankind

    in Christianity

    One primary cause lurks behind the suffering and tragic circumstances that afflict so many people. The Bible reveals that a powerful, intelligent and vastly influential being actively orchestrates the wickedness that dominates our planet. Most of us have heard of him. The Bible most often calls him the devil and Satan.You may have wondered whether he really exists. After all, to many the devil seems like a fairy-tale character—a grotesque, blood-red creature with horns, a pointed tail and bat’s wings who

  • 01:30

    Black Reconstruction #LaShawnAllenMuhammad 323.927.2913

    in Finance

    Hosted By: LaShawn Allen-Muhammad


    Who were the first Black Elected Officials? During the month of November, as the country gears up to re-elect or vote in the next wave of politicians, Black Reconstruction will revisit the Reconstruction era to pay homage to the Black Men who came before Obama.  During this tumultuous time, Blacks not only established townships, they also positioned themselves to be an integral part of government.   


    At a Glance.. In 1855, Brownhelm Township, founded by Col. Henry Brown,  gained notoriety throughout the U.S, when the township elected an African-American to government office.  The NY Syracuse Daily Journal, May 31, 1855 reported that John Mercer Langston was a fugitive slave who had been elected clerk.  Brownhelm's early residents had long been known for their strong anti-slavery stance; and Col. Henry Brown's home on the Lake Shore was often a final stop on the Underground Railroad, before reaching Canada by boat.    African-American Firsts: Government


    Local elected official: John Mercer Langston, 1855, town clerk of Brownhelm Township, Ohio.


    State elected official: Alexander Lucius Twilight, 1836, the Vermont legislature.


    Governor (appointed): P.B.S. Pinchback served as governor of Louisiana from Dec. 9, 1872-Jan. 13, 1873, during impeachment proceedings against the elected governor.


    U.S. Representative: Joseph Rainey became a Congressman from South Carolina in 1870 and was reelected four more times. 


    U.S. Senator: Hiram Revels became Senator from Mississippi from Feb. 25, 1870, to March 4, 1871, during Reconstruction.  


    There have only been a total of five black senators in U.S. history: the remaining two are Blanche K. Bruce [1875-1881] and Barack Obama 


     

  • 01:30

    Black Reconstruction #LaShawnAllenMuhammad 323.927.2913

    in Politics

    Hosted By: LaShawn Allen-Muhammad


    Who were the first Black Elected Officials? During the month of November, as the country gears up to re-elect or vote in the next wave of politicians, Black Reconstruction will revisit the Reconstruction era to pay homage to the Black Men who came before Obama.  During this tumultuous time, Blacks not only established townships, they also positioned themselves to be an integral part of government.   


    At a Glance.. In 1855, Brownhelm Township, founded by Col. Henry Brown,  gained notoriety throughout the U.S, when the township elected an African-American to government office.  The NY Syracuse Daily Journal, May 31, 1855 reported that John Mercer Langston was a fugitive slave who had been elected clerk.  Brownhelm's early residents had long been known for their strong anti-slavery stance; and Col. Henry Brown's home on the Lake Shore was often a final stop on the Underground Railroad, before reaching Canada by boat.    African-American Firsts: Government


    Local elected official: John Mercer Langston, 1855, town clerk of Brownhelm Township, Ohio.


    State elected official: Alexander Lucius Twilight, 1836, the Vermont legislature.


    Governor (appointed): P.B.S. Pinchback served as governor of Louisiana from Dec. 9, 1872-Jan. 13, 1873, during impeachment proceedings against the elected governor.


    U.S. Representative: Joseph Rainey became a Congressman from South Carolina in 1870 and was reelected four more times. 


    U.S. Senator: Hiram Revels became Senator from Mississippi from Feb. 25, 1870, to March 4, 1871, during Reconstruction.  


    There have only been a total of five black senators in U.S. history: the remaining two are Blanche K. Bruce [1875-1881] and Barack Obama 


     


     

  • 03:42
  • 00:03

    Krayzie Bone Chasing The Devil Last album?

    in Entertainment

    Is Chasing The Devil going to be Krayzie Bone's last album according to this twitter tweet from him yes! It's sad but true

  • 01:07

    Black Reconstruction #LaShawnAllenMuhammad 323.927.2913

    in Politics

    Hosted By: LaShawn Allen-Muhammad


    Who were the first Black Elected Officials? During the month of November, as the country gears up to re-elect or vote in the next wave of politicians, Black Reconstruction will revisit the Reconstruction era to pay homage to the Black Men who came before Obama.  During this tumultuous time, Blacks not only established townships, they also positioned themselves to be an integral part of government.   


    At a Glance.. In 1855, Brownhelm Township, founded by Col. Henry Brown,  gained notoriety throughout the U.S, when the township elected an African-American to government office.  The NY Syracuse Daily Journal, May 31, 1855 reported that John Mercer Langston was a fugitive slave who had been elected clerk.  Brownhelm's early residents had long been known for their strong anti-slavery stance; and Col. Henry Brown's home on the Lake Shore was often a final stop on the Underground Railroad, before reaching Canada by boat.    African-American Firsts: Government


    Local elected official: John Mercer Langston, 1855, town clerk of Brownhelm Township, Ohio.


    State elected official: Alexander Lucius Twilight, 1836, the Vermont legislature.


    Governor (appointed): P.B.S. Pinchback served as governor of Louisiana from Dec. 9, 1872-Jan. 13, 1873, during impeachment proceedings against the elected governor.


    U.S. Representative: Joseph Rainey became a Congressman from South Carolina in 1870 and was reelected four more times.