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  • 02:01

    Circuit Court Clerk Dorothy Brown Discusses Criminal Justice

    in Women

    Circuit Court Clerk Dorothy Brown presides over one of the largest court systems in the nation. Today she talks about her role in the criminal justice system and how to make it more fair and just for all. Clerk Brown is responsible for managing an annual operating budget of more than $100 million and has a work force of over 1800 employees.  Elected in 2000 and continuously re-elected, she has established an illustrious record of professional and public service.

  • 01:12

    Racial Profiling: The New Face of Prejudice in 2015

    in Current Events

    Just when we thought the rederick had reached it's boiling point, Donald Trump suggests that we ban all Muslims from entering the country.  As ridiculous as this seems, he has supporters.  How have we reached a point where we label all Muslims as terrorists?  How far have we really come as a society?  Racial profiling still exists yet we're encouraged to just tolerate it.  How can we move beyond the hashtags and make real change in our society?  We will talk about this on Justified Madness this week.

  • 00:06

    Research Methods in Criminal Justice – Quantitative Data Analysis

    in Training

    Brought to you by The American Public Safety Training Institute (TAPSTI) www.tapsti.org, this 2 hour session will review the work of Dr. Peter Kraska and Dr. W. Lawrence Neuman and their excellent textbook entitled “Criminal Justice and Criminology Research Methods” (2012, 2nd ed.).  This seminar focuses on a mainstay of criminal justice research - quantitative data analysis. We all work with numbers. If you want to work with research in your local departments/agencies your first research is bound to be quantitative. This seminar will include introductions to such concepts as scattergrams, pie charts, correlations, multiple regressions, and tables of number. These are largely visual so you are going to have to go look these up in order to really appreciate the content here about them. 

  • 00:55
  • 01:27

    TONY KING AUDIO- CRIMINAL CASES- GSA BONDS

    in Education

    THIS IS THE AUDIO FROM TONY KING. THE INDIVIDUAL WHO BROUGHT OUT THE INFORMATION OF GSA BONDS.

  • 01:58

    Research Methods in Criminal Justice – Nonreactive Research

    in Training

    Brought to you by The American Public Safety Training Institute (TAPSTI) www.tapsti.org, this 2 hour session will review the work of Dr. Peter Kraska and Dr. W. Lawrence Neuman and their excellent textbook entitled “Criminal Justice and Criminology Research Methods” (2012, 2nd ed.).  The subject matter for this seminar is Nonreactive Research and this type of research is widely used in crime and justice studies. The main way we do this research is by taking advantage of the huge amounts of data, in many forms, we continue accumulating. The authors of our reference text speak of federal crime statistics (UCR, NCVS), the, "General Social Survey, police and prison records, video-surveillance data, existing self-report data, incarceration trends, drug use statistics, documents concerning prisoners released from death row, and court proceedings documents" as well as, "media articles, Web sites, television shows, roadside memorials, hospital records, census reports, and economic data " (Kraska & Neuman, 2012, p. 206). This seminar explains how to use all the data which your department already has collected for you. 

  • 01:57

    Research Methods in Criminal Justice – Experimental and Quasi-Experimental

    in Training

    Brought to you by The American Public Safety Training Institute (TAPSTI) www.tapsti.org, this 2 hour session will review the work of Dr. Peter Kraska and Dr. W. Lawrence Neuman and their excellent textbook entitled “Criminal Justice and Criminology Research Methods” (2012, 2nd ed.).  Experiments are common and credible for developing and testing theory. Crime and justice research is used to make justice "smarter" these days and more effective so we better know how to solve today's problems. We call this "applied research". Experiments help to both evaluate criminal justice and crime control practices as well as develop causal laws. This seminar bridges from talking about experiments and their usefulness to a discussion about Kraska and Neuman's "Eight Principles for Assessing Feasibility of Crime and Justice Experiments" so you can better figure out if you are prepared enough to do any research at all given your circumstances and the tools available. 

  • "The Blurred Lines Of Sports: Dirty Plays, Or Criminal Acts?"

    in Lifestyle

    Intensive, hard core, often blood-curdling physical contact in sports such as basketball, hockey and football is a natural expectation in game plays. There is an expected risk of injury to the players in the normal hustle and bustle of the sport. But with the rise of flagrant fouls, penalties, scandals and serious injuries to other players resulting in fines and game suspensions, have the game plays crossed the line of 'good intense sports" to criminal assault? 


    Cincinatti Bengals' linebacker Vontaze Burfict makes a deliberate beeline for Pittsburgh Steelers' wide receiver Antonio Brown's head, while Adam Pacman Jones responds to Assistant Coach Joey Porter's illegal presence in the sidelines with violence, in addition to previous infractions--such as deliberately removing the helmet of Oakland Raiders' Amari Cooper and banging Cooper's head on the helmet while on the field--clearly are not moves or actions necessary to play great football. Under any other circumstances, this would be a prosecutable offense, and the immediate throwing of the multiple flags on the field tells that they were flagrantly foul actions.. even by the NFL's guidleines. However, the NFL punished one of those actions while overlooking the other.


    When does a player's actions on the field go beyond the scope of "great sports maneuvers" and turn into acts of assault?  Are fines and game suspensions adequate punishments for repeat offenders? Tune in tonight at 10:30 pm EST by calling 347-327-9967.

  • 02:00

    "The Blurred Lines OF Sports: Dirty Plays, Or Criminal Assault?"

    in Lifestyle

    Intensive, hard core, often blood-curdling physical contact in sports such as basketball, hockey and football is a natural expectation in game plays. There is an expected risk of injury to the players in the normal hustle and bustle of the sport. But with the rise of flagrant fouls, penalties, scandals and serious injuries to other players resulting in fines and game suspensions, have the game plays crossed the line of 'good intense sports" to criminal assault? 


    Cincinatti Bengals' linebacker Vontaze Burfict makes a deliberate beeline for Pittsburgh Steelers' wide receiver Antonio Brown's head, while Adam Pacman Jones responds to Assistant Coach Joey Porter's illegal presence in the sidelines with violence, in addition to previous infractions--such as deliberately removing the helmet of Oakland Raiders' Amari Cooper and banging Cooper's head on the helmet while on the field--clearly are not moves or actions necessary to play great football. Under any other circumstances, this would be a prosecutable offense, and the immediate throwing of the multiple flags on the field tells that they were flagrantly foul actions.. even by the NFL's guidleines. However, the NFL punished one of those actions while overlooking the other.


    When does a player's actions on the field go beyond the scope of "great sports maneuvers" and turn into acts of assault?  Are fines and game suspensions adequate punishments for repeat offenders? Tune in tonight at 10:30 pm EST by calling 347-327-9967.

  • 01:48

    Research Methods in Criminal Justice – Quantitative and Qualitative Design

    in Training

    Brought to you by The American Public Safety Training Institute (TAPSTI) www.tapsti.org, this 2 hour session will review the work of Dr. Peter Kraska and Dr. W. Lawrence Neuman and their excellent textbook entitled “Criminal Justice and Criminology Research Methods” (2012, 2nd ed.).  This seminar introduces the listener to a very deep discussion about sampling. Sampling variables discussed include: Probability Sampling, Random Sampling, Systematic Sampling, Stratified Sampling, Cluster Sampling, Sampling Size, Nonprobability Sampling, Haphazard Sampling, Purposive Sampling, Snowball Sampling, Sequential Sampling, and Theoretical Sampling. Also discussed are hidden populations and mixed sampling approaches. Then we head into Qualitative and Quantitative research and the differences between hard and soft data. Reliability, validity, bricolage, interpretation (first, second, and third-order), and document analysis follow. Other topics will be discussed as time allows.


     

  • 01:59

    Research Methods in Criminal Justice – Theory and Philosophy

    in Training

    Brought to you by The American Public Safety Training Institute (TAPSTI) www.tapsti.org, this 2 hour session will review the work of Dr. Peter Kraska and Dr. W. Lawrence Neuman in their excellent textbook entitled “Criminal Justice and Criminology Research Methods” (2012, 2nd ed.).  This first seminar helps answer some basic questions about knowledge, how it is constructed and what it has to do with criminal justice studies. We have questions we ask every day, departments across the country need research done, but who is to say what research needs to be done and how it is to be done to satisfy the needs of that Chief, Warden, Regional Administrator, or other agency manager who needs to make serious and accurate decisions based on your work? This seminar introduces the concepts of epistemology, positivist social science, interpretive social science, and critical social science. Then we go into the parts of a theory and variables in research before expanding to the development of a theory.  The latter half of the seminar reviews Grounded Theory, Temporal Order, Association, Types of Variables, etc. and then we finish up with Hypothesis and errors in reasoning.