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  • 00:58

    Love At Our Roots: How Freedom Became A Force For Change - James H. Commander

    in History

    James H. Commander utilized genealogical research techniques to author his book, Love At Our Roots: How Freedom Became A Force For Change.


    His book has been accepted into the prestigious Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture in New York, as well as, the Auburn Avenue Research Library on African American Culture and History in Atlanta, Georgia. His lecture focuses on using family research to uncover empowering heritage for future generations.


    Commander holds a Bachelor and Master's degree in arts, entertainment and media management from Columbia College of Chicago, Full Sail University.  He resides in Greenville, South Carolina with his family.


     


     

  • 00:59

    Problem Solving in Genealogical Research with Mary M.Tedesco

    in History

     


    Problem Solving in Genealogical Research
    (Strategies / ideas for breaking through your genealogy brick walls.)


    MARY M. TEDESCO is a professional genealogist, speaker, and author. She is a Host / Genealogist on the PBS TV series Genealogy Roadshow (season 2) and the Founder of ORIGINS ITALY. Mary speaks Italian and travels often to Italy to conduct client genealogical research and visit family. Mary is the co-author of Tracing Your Italian Ancestors an 84-page Italian research guide published by Moorshead Magazines. She holds a Bachelor of Arts in Mathematics from Boston University and a Certificate in Genealogical Research from Boston University’s Center for Professional Education. In addition to her Italian ancestry (Calabria, Trentino-Alto Adige, and Tuscany) on her father’s side, she also has deep American roots (German, Irish, Danish & English) on her mother’s side and is proud member of the Daughters of the American Revolution. Mary is a member of a number of local and national genealogical societies and serves on the Board of Directors of the Massachusetts Genealogical Council. She can be contacted at www.originsitaly.com


     

  • 00:59

    Your Family Name Was Not Changed at Ellis Island - Kenneth A. Bravo, JD

    in History

    Why the New York Times is Wrong – Using Basic Genealogy Tools and Methods to Show that Your Family Name Was Not Changed At Ellis Island.


    There is a common misconception, call it an old wives tale or an urban legend, that family names were often changed at Ellis Island.  Such myths gain a great deal of credibility when newspapers such as the New York Times, the country’s “paper of record”, perpetuates these myths by repeating them, in this case in obituaries.


    When Kenneth saw one of these obituaries a few years ago, he wrote to the Times pointing out their error and suggesting sources that they could check to verify what he was saying.  When they seemed to ignore him, he did the research on the family of the person named in the obituary and was able to show what the name was when the family immigrated and how the family name changed as they adapted to life in the United States.  He sent all of the proof to the Times and was still ignored.  Finally the Times responded.  They were not going to do anything to correct the erroneous obituary but suggested they might do a news story on the issue.  The experience led him to do a search of other Times obituaries with the Ellis Island story.  He located about half a dozen.  After doing the research on each, he was able to show the original name for each of them.


    Kenneth A. Bravo received his JD from The Ohio State University, College of Law and his B.A. degree in Economics from Rutgers University, New Brunswick, New Jersey.  He is Vice President of the International Association of Jewish Genealogical Societies (IAJGS) and, the former president and current member of the Board of Trustees of the Jewish Genealogy Society of Cleveland.  Bravo has lectured on a number of genealogical topics.

  • 01:22

    South Carolina Stories: Rennard East, Patricia Lowman Pryor, Elizabeth Robeson

    in History

    The Truth About The Lowman Family Lynchings in Aiken, South Carolina


    Rennard East is a hip hop artist/ songwriter from Philadelphia, PA and one of his new passions is genealogy because he knew nothing about his ancestors when growing up.  Patricia Lowman Pryor has always wondered about the truth concerning her grandmother Bertha Lowman and will share her research and discovery behind this story.


    Historian Elizabeth Robeson - a leading researcher on the Lowman Family Lynchings will provide the political, and social order through which African Americans had to navigate a hostile and dangerous existence in the South. Elizabeth Robeson holds the M.Phil in American history from Columbia University where she was a fellowship doctoral candidate studying under Professor Barbara J. Fields. The Lowman Family Lynchings is the subject of her dissertation and a book manuscript in progress. 


     

  • 01:16

    Records of Post-Civil War Federal Agencies at NARA - Reginald Washington

    in History

    The National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) is the official repository of the permanently valuable records of the U.S. Government.  NARA's vast holdings document the lives and experiences of persons who interacted with the Federal Government.  The records created by post-Civil War Federal Agencies are perhaps some of the most important records available for the study of black family life and genealogy.  This discussion will focus on NARA's Reference Information Paper 108.


    This reference information paper describes three post-Civil War Federal agencies' records: the Bureau of Refugees, Freedmen, and Abandoned Lands; the Freedman's Savings and Trust Company; and the Commissioners of Claims. Case examples will be shared to illustrate the value of researching these important records.


    Reginald Washington is a retired archivist/ genealogy specialist with the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA). He lectures frequently on records and research procedures at the National Archives, and has served as the African-American Genealogy Subject Area Specialist at NARA. He has spoken at conferences of the Afro-American Historical and Genealogical Society, National Genealogical Society, Federation of Genealogical Societies, National Institute on Genealogical Research, and numerous local genealogical societies and clubs. 


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     

  • 00:58

    Using Civil Rights Records to Find The Story in Your Family- Antoinette Harrell

    in History

    Using Civil Rights Records to Find The Story In Your Community and Family


    Please join genealogist and family historian Antoinette Harrell for a discussion of how and why researchers will want to explore the Civil Rights records to find relatives that were engaged in the Civil Rights movement throughout the South.  Ms. Harrell will use a case example of Mr. Herbert Lee a Civil Rights leader from Amite County, Mississippi to illustrate what was documented in Federal Records about him.


    Antoinette Harrell, a renowned genealogist, author and blogger whose genealogical research has been featured on Nightline News, People Magazine and many other national and international public media. Harrell is the host and producer of Nurturing Our Roots Television and Nurturing Our Roots Blog Talk Radio and was appointed Honorary Attorney General in the State of Louisiana in 2003 for her studies in genealogy. She is also one of the recipients of the ASLAH Award in 2013 for her outstanding services as a humanitarian activist and film maker and has been featured in “Chronicle On Civil Rights” & Civil Rights History from the Ground Up: Local Struggles a National Movement.


    The Department of Justice Records are available under the Civil Rights Division at the National Archives.


    The Civil Rights Division of the Department of Justice, created in 1957 by the enactment of the Civil Rights Act of 1957, works to uphold the civil and constitutional rights of all Americans, particularly some of the most vulnerable members of our society. The Division enforces federal statutes prohibiting discrimination on the basis of race, color, sex, disability, religion, familial status and national origin.

  • 00:57

    Using Civil Rights Records to Find the Story with Antoinette Harrell

    in History

    Using Civil Rights Records to Find The Story In Your Community and Family


    Please join genealogist and family historian Antoinette Harrell for a discussion of how and why researchers will want to explore the Civil Rights records to find relatives that were engaged in the Civil Rights movement throughout the South.  Ms. Harrell will use a case example of Mr. Herbert Lee a Civil Rights leader from Amite County, Mississippi to illustrate what was documented in Federal Records about him.


    Antoinette Harrell, a renowned genealogist, author and blogger whose genealogical research has been featured on Nightline News, People Magazine and many other national and international public media. Harrell is the host and producer of Nurturing Our Roots Television and Nurturing Our Roots Blog Talk Radio and was appointed Honorary Attorney General in the State of Louisiana in 2003 for her studies in genealogy. She is also one of the recipients of the ASLAH Award in 2013 for her outstanding services as a humanitarian activist and film maker and has been featured in “Chronicle On Civil Rights” & Civil Rights History from the Ground Up: Local Struggles a National Movement.


    The Department of Justice Records are available under the Civil Rights Division at the National Archives.


    The Civil Rights Division of the Department of Justice, created in 1957 by the enactment of the Civil Rights Act of 1957, works to uphold the civil and constitutional rights of all Americans, particularly some of the most vulnerable members of our society. The Division enforces federal statutes prohibiting discrimination on the basis of race, color, sex, disability, religion, familial status and national origin.


     


     


     

  • 01:05

    Gather at the Table Revisited with Sharon Morgan and Thomas Norman Dewolf

    in History

    Gather at the Table: The Healing Journey of a Daughter of Slavery and a Son of the Slave Trade --


     


    -- is the chronicle of a shared journey toward racial reconciliation. Informed by genealogy, it deals with race, social justice and healing from the traumatic wounds of slavery. Over a three year period, the authors traveled through 27 states, visiting ancestral towns, courthouses, cemeteries, plantations, antebellum mansions, and historic sites. 


    Bernice Alexander Bennett welcomes Sharon Leslie Morgan and Thomas Norman Dewolf to share this compelling journey with us.


    Sharon Morgan is a marketing communications consultant and a nationally recognized pioneer in multicultural marketing. An avid genealogist, she is the webmaster for OurBlackAncestry.com and is a founder of the Black Public Relations Society. 


    Thomas Norman DeWolf, author of Inheriting the Trade, is featured in the Emmy-nominated documentary film Traces of the Trade, which premiered at the Sundance Film Festival and on the acclaimed PBS series POV. DeWolf speaks regularly about healing from the legacy of slavery and racism at conferences and colleges throughout the United States. 

  • 01:27

    African Americans in 19th Century Alexandria with Char McCargo Bah

    in History

    Prior to the Civil War, Alexandria, Virginia had a large freed African American and slave population who contributed a lot to the community and to the United States.  Each one of these groups helped build Alexandria, Virginia through their skilled labor, involvement in politics, teachers, churches, businessmen and etc. The history of Alexandria, Virginia cannot be told without including these African Americans.


    Char is posting blogs every two weeks on African American people in the 19th century that made a difference in the History of Alexandria, Virginia at http://theotheralexandria.com.


    Char McCargo Bah is the CEO/Owner of FindingThingsforU, LLC.  She has been a genealogist since 1981; appeared on numerous television interviews with CBS, FOX-5, Comcast, Public Broadcasting Services just to name a few and documentaries. She has also received numerous awards in 2014, 2013, 2010, and in 2009 for her work in genealogy. Char became a 2014 Living Legend in Alexandria, VA.  She was the City of Alexandria’s genealogist on the Alexandria Freedmen and Contraband Cemetery.  She is doing an advance study in genealogy at the University of Toronto and is co-author of “African Americans of Alexandria, VA: Beacons of Light in the Twentieth Century.”


     

  • 00:56

    "The Black Loggers of Wallowa County, Oregon" with Pearl Alice Marsh, Ph.D.

    in History

    "THE BLACK LOGGERS OF WALLOWA COUNTY, OR"


    In 1923, the Bowman-Hicks Lumber Company of Missouri built Maxville, a logging camp in Wallowa County, Oregon and brought 40-60 African American loggers as part of the labor pool.  This project uses genealogy research methods to reconstruct the social history of these workers.


    Dr. Pearl Alice Marsh (Ph.D.) is a retired foreign policy expert and now spends all of her time doing genealogy and historical community research.  She currently is working on her father's memoir and assisting other descendants of the original loggers to find their roots.  She is an active member of the Wallowa (Oregon) Historical Society and the African American Genealogical Society of Northern California.


     

  • 01:29

    A Journey To Discover My Ghanaian Roots with Carol Hector-Harris

    in History

    Many Americans of African descent have thought that connecting with their African kin was next to impossible, yet Carol Hector-Harris has done just that. Not only did she visit Ghana but she also met relatives. She is the fifth great-granddaughter of Africa-born Quock Martrick, who served in the Revolutionary War with George Washington in New York. She found Martrick's family, HER FAMILY, in Big Ada, Ghana. She also met members of her ethnic group, the Ga-Adangbe (the African lineage she discovered through DNA testing), which includes Sangmorkie Tetteh, who is with Carol in the photo.


    Carol Hector-Harris earned a Bachelor of Arts in Journalism and a Master of Arts in Political Science from The Ohio State University. Currently she is working toward a Ph.D. at Ohio University’s Scripps College of Communication. An eleventh generation Bostonian, she lives in Columbus, Ohio with her husband, two sons, and eight grandchildren. Ms. Hector-Harris serves as the librarian for a Columbus chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution.