• 00:49

    National Liberty Memorial with Maurice Barboza

    in History

    Maurice A. Barboza is the founder and CEO of National Mall Liberty Fund DC, a non-profit authorized by Public Law 112-239 to establish a memorial to African American contributions to liberty during the Revolutionary War. In September 2014, Public Law 113-176 made the National Liberty Memorial eligible for a site in Washington's Monumental Core. He said, "this memorial will remind Americans that it was their vision for America that prevailed."


    Mr. Barboza has written opinion pieces and spoken extensively about the 30-year quest to construct the memorial and his aunt's trail-blazing battle in the mid-1980s for membership in the Daughters of the American Revolution. A 2013 book, "Sacrificing Soldiers on the National Mall," by Kristin Haas, and a recent article in the Washington Post, "After 30 years, a site for memorial," by Tom Jackman, tell the story.


    National Mall Liberty Fund DC


    www.libertyfunddc.com


     


     

  • 00:59

    Ireland and the Slave Trade with Maurice Gleeson, MD

    in History

    What role did the Irish play in the Transatlantic slave trade? Were the Irish ever enslaved or slave owners?


    Join my special guest, Dr. Maurice Gleeson for a compelling overview of Ireland and the Slave Trade.


    Dr. Maurice Gleeson is a psychiatrist from Dublin who works in London as a pharmaceutical physician. He is an avid genealogist and has traced his Irish family tree back to about 1800 on half of his ancestral lines. Using DNA, he was able to get back into the 1600's on one line, and this inspired his interest in Ireland's involvement with the Transatlantic Slave Trade.

  • 01:00

    Go Stand Upon The Rock with Samuel Michael Lemon, Ed.D.

    in History

    GO STAND UPON THE ROCK (2014) is a deeply moving Civil War-era novel based on stories handed down by Sam Lemon's grandmother about the lives of her grandparents who were once runaway slaves from Virginia. It is a tale of unsettling plantation life, courageous women, dramatic Civil War battles, heroes, hoodoo, and the indomitable strength of the human spirit. The book is supported by historical and genealogical research, photographs, and documents from his doctoral dissertation. This is a compelling and emotionally engaging history that comes alive through the lives of real people and events. 


    Dr. Sam Lemon grew up in Media, Pennsylvania, where his maternal great-great grandparents arrived as runaway slaves during the Civil War. Given refuge and support by local Quakers, his ancestors prospered and became prominent members of the community. He is currently an assistant professor and the director of a graduate program at Neumann University in Pennsylvania, and formerly worked in the fields of social services, education, and public television at WHYY in Philadelphia.

  • 01:02

    Back There, Then with Linda Crichlow White

    in History

    "Whenever Mommy tells stories of the past, she usually begins with Back There, then..." Linda Crichlow White


    BACK THERE, THEN  was written by Marietta Stevens Crichlow in the 1990s and discovered by her daugther Linda Crichlow White in 1999. Linda will share her story and offer words of wisdom to others considering writing a historical genealogy memoir.


    A working knowledge of the lives and accomplishments of our ancestors provides us not merely with a look back but a look "in."  Marrietta's Introduction...


    Linda Crichlow White received her B.S. from West Virginia State College and M.S. in Human Ecology from Howard University. She taught home economics in both Brooklyn and DC Public Schools before attending Catholic University, earning a Masters in Library Science. She also worked as a School Library Media Specialist in Montgomery County, Maryland prior to her retirement in 2013.


     

  • 01:01

    A Chosen Exile: A History of Racial Passing in American Life - Allyson Hobbs

    in History

    A Chosen Exile: A History of Racial Passing in American Life, published by Harvard University Press, examines the phenomenon of racial passing in the United States from the late eighteenth century to the present.


    Allyson Hobbs is an assistant professor in the history department at Stanford.  She graduated magna cum laude from Harvard and she received a Ph.D. with distinction from the University of Chicago.  She has received fellowships from the Ford Foundation, the Clayman Institute for Gender Research, and the Center for the Comparative Study of Race and Ethnicity at Stanford.  Allyson teaches courses on American identity, African American history, African American women’s history, and twentieth century American history. She has won numerous teaching awards including the Phi Beta Kappa Teaching Prize.  She has appeared on C-Span and National Public Radio and her work has been featured on cnn.com and slate.com.  


     

  • 00:54

    Advocating for a Cultural Heritage Site with Margo Lee Williams

    in History

    Margo Lee Williams will share her research and journey to gain designation of the first African American site (Strieby Congregational United Church of Christ), by the Randolph County North Carolina Historical Preservation Commission for Cultural Heritage Sites.


    Margo Lee Williams holds an MA in Sociology and an MA in Religious Education. She developed an interest in genealogy early in life and in the 30+ years since, she has researched and written extensively on her family, including her book: Miles Lassiter (circa 1777-1850), an Early African American Quaker from Lassiter Mill, Randolph County, North Carolina: My Research Journey to Home, for which she won the 2012 Excellence in Publishing Award from the North Carolina Genealogical Society.


    Margo is a well-known lecturer for the Family History Centers of the LDS Church in the Washington, DC area, a former editor of the Journal of the Afro-American Historical and Genealogical Society, and through her private research company, Personal Prologue, has developed expertise in identifying heirs for intestate probates. She is currently a National Veterans’ Service Officer with Vietnam Veterans of America. 

  • 01:00

    Freedom Papers with Rebecca Scott, Ph.D.

    in History

     


    Rebecca J. Scott, author of Freedom Papers: An Atlantic Odyssey in the Age of Emancipation, and co-authored with Jean M. Hébrard, will discuss how they traced one family across five generations and three continents, into slavery and then back into freedom.


    Freedom papers is the 2012 Recipient of the Albert J. Beveridge Award and the James A. Rawley Prize in Atlantic History - American Historical Association. Scott teaches history and law at the University of Michigan. She is also a recipient of the Guggenheim Fellowship and a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

  • 01:30

    African and Native American Research with Angela Walton-Raji

    in History

    Genealogist Angela Walton-Raji has committed herself to sharing information with the descendants of the Freedmen of Indian Territory--which is now Oklahoma. She is the author of  the book Black Indian Genealogy Research: African American Ancestors Among the Five Civilized Tribes. The book serves as a guide to researching the history and lives of the 20,000 Freedmen of Indian Territory, who have been deleted from American history. She is also the author of the http://african-nativeamerican.blogspot.com.


    The Dawes Commission, named after Henry C. Dawes who chaired the commission, consisted of a process that would lead to a redistribution of land to those who already owned it among the Five "Civilized" Tribes. Understand that land was held in common by the Five Civilized Tribes. The Dawes Enrollment process was created to determine who would be eligible for allotted parcels of land. Eligibility involved providing "proof" that one had been a part of the tribe for several decades, and especially in those years immediately following the Civil War. So one had to prove that one had been a part of the Indian Community since 1866. For those whose ancestors were enslaved by members of the Tribes, (the Freedmen)  they had to often provide proof that their former enslaver was a member of the tribe.

  • 01:17

    Forging Freedom: Amrita Chakrabarti Myers, Ph.D.

    in History

    Forging Freedom: Black Women and the Pursuit of Liberty in Antebellum Charleston


    For black women in antebellum Charleston, freedom was not a static legal category but a fragile and contingent experience. A deeply researched social history, Forging Freedom reveals the ways in which black women in Charleston acquired, defined, and defended their own vision of freedom.


    Drawing on legislative and judicial materials, probate data, tax lists, church records, family papers, and more, Myers creates detailed portraits of individual women while exploring how black female Charlestonians sought to create a fuller freedom by improving their financial, social, and legal standing. Examining both those who were officially manumitted and those who lived as free persons but lacked official documentation, Myers reveals that free black women filed lawsuits and petitions, acquired property (including slaves), entered into contracts, paid taxes, earned wages, attended schools, and formed familial alliances with wealthy and powerful men, black and white--all in an effort to solidify and expand their freedom. Never fully free, black women had to depend on their skills of negotiation in a society dedicated to upholding both slavery and patriarchy. Forging Freedom thus examines the many ways in which Charleston's black women crafted a freedom of their own design instead of accepting the limited existence imagined for them by white Southerners.


    Amrita Chakrabarti Myers earned her doctorate in American History from Rutgers University. A historian of the black female experience, she is interested in race, gender, sexuality, rights, freedom, and citizenship and the ways in which these constructs intersect with one another in the lives of black women in the Old South. She is currently Associate Professor of History and Gender Studies at Indiana University in Bloomington, Indiana.


     

  • 01:02

    Searching Records of Incarceration with Sharon Batiste Gillins

    in History

    Have you ever considered searching records of incarceration to find your ancestors? 


    Whether researching a notorious family outlaw or a victim of early 20th century justice, there’s a good chance that you have an ancestor who has been incarcerated. Researching records of incarceration at local, state or federal penal institutions can reveal valuable family history information and also document shameful community patterns of social and economic abuse against blacks. 


    Join Sharon Batiste Gillins for an engaging discussion on the genealogical value of searching records of the incarcerated.


    Sharon Batiste Gillins is a native of Galveston, Texas with paternal ancestral roots in St. Mary Parish, Louisiana and maternal roots in Fort Bend County, Texas. A life-long interest in her family's history led to an active involvement in researching African American family history over the past 25 years. While researching her own family, she developed an in interest in unique and under-utilized record systems and record groups.  Some of her more recent work focuses on strategies researchers can use to analyze Louisiana’s Freedmen’s Bureau field office records for revealing, often personal information on freedmen ancestors.


    Ms. Gillins is a member of the Galveston Historical Society, National Genealogical Society, and Afro-American Historical and Genealogical Society.  A retired Associate Professor at Riverside City College, she frequently calls upon her career background as a college educator to present workshops or deliver courses at regional and national conferences and genealogical institutes.   She is also a member of the adjunct faculty at Samford Institute of Genealogy and Historical Research in Birmingham.  

  • 01:15

    Records of Ante-Bellum Southern Plantations with Jean L. Cooper

    in History

     


    Records of Ante-Bellum Southern Plantations with Jean L. Cooper


    Welcome, Jean L. Cooper, a Cataloger and Reference Librarian, and Genealogical Resources Specialist at the University of Virginia Library. 


    Ms. Cooper received the Virginia Genealogical Society’s Virginia Records Award in 2009 for her work in indexing the Records of Ante-Bellum Southern Plantations microfilm collection. She has a B.A. from Alma College (Alma, MI), and an M.L. from the University of South Carolina (Columbia, SC).


    Records of Ante-Bellum Southern Plantations is a set of microfilms that contains images of manuscript materials from fourteen different libraries and archives across the South. 


    The entire set includes 1500 reels of microfilm, each with approximately 1000 frames resulting in 1.5 million manuscript images of material written primarily between the American Revolution and the Civil War. The items indexed include deeds, wills, estate papers, genealogies, personal and business correspondence, account books, slave lists, and many other types of records.


    Title: Index to Records of Ante-Bellum Southern Plantations: Locations, Plantations, Surnames and Collections, 2d ed.


    Author: Jean L. Cooper


    Publisher: MacFarland, 2009


    ISBN: 978-0786439904

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