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  • 00:59

    USCT Civil War Widows' Pension Stories with Tonya Hull and Antoinette Broussard

    in History

    Tonya M. Hull has been researching for 30 years. She is a genealogical researcher, lecturer and writer. She was the lead researcher for the PBS series it’s A Family Reunion, Co-Author of “African Americans of Giles County”.  She has served as president for a local genealogical society. She is currently studying to become a certified genealogist. 


    Antoinette Broussard has contributed biographies to the African American National Biography (edited by Dr. Henry Louis Gates, Jr., and Evelyn Brooks Higginbotham, Oxford Press 2008) and to Harlem of the West (photographer Lewis Watts and editor Elizabeth Pepin, Chronicle Books, 2006). She is currently a writer and co-producer for the Days With Zahrah television show (ABC7), and periodically appear on the show as Ms. Etiquette. In addition, she has  co-authored the forthcoming book, Days With Zahrah Travel Guide (May 2015), and has also published various articles on the accomplishments of her great aunt, Dr. Nettie Craig Asberry—a civil rights activist, and her cousin, Lulu Craig Sadler—a pioneer educator.


     

  • 01:25

    Genetic Genealogy Standards and More with Blaine Bettinger, Ph.D., J.D.

    in History

    Explore the new Genetic Genealogy Standards ( www.geneticgenealogystandards.com), GEDmatch.com, and genetic genealogy in general with Blaine Bettinger, Ph.D., J.D.


    Blaine Bettinger, Ph.D. (Biochemistry), J.D., is an intellectual property attorney in Syracuse, New York.  In 2007 he started The Genetic Genealogist blog, one of the most respected and easy to understand of the blogs on this topic. He is an instructor for genetic genealogy courses at the Institute of Genealogy and Historical Research (IGHR), Salt Lake Institute of Genealogy (SLIG), Genealogical Research Institute of Pittsburgh (GRIP), Virtual Institute of Genealogical Research, and Family Tree University. Blaine was also recently elected to the New York Genealogical and Biographical Society’s Board of Trustees.

  • 01:00

    Forgotten Black Soldiers in White Civil War Regiments: Dr. Juanita P. Moss

    in History

    Forgotten Black Soldiers Who Served in White Regiments During The Civil War: Volumes I and II 


       Dr. Juanita Patience Moss is the great granddaughter of a Civil War veteran, the granddaughter of a northeastern Pennsylvania entrepreneur who became an anthracite coal carver, and the daughter of a unique coal sculptor who was featured in the EBONY Magazine (March 1970). A former high school biology teacher, her interests unexpectedly changed after retirement and took another direction. Using her scientific background, she made a hypothesis and set out to prove it. As a result she has published two volumes concerning hundreds of Union Black soldiers whose military service was forgotten until 1998. Now they are being remembered and honored, too.


     

  • 01:09

    Burial Site Preservation in New Orleans with Dr. D. Ryan Gray

    in History

    Holt Cemetery, New Orleans’ still-active potter’s field, has been a subject of concern for many groups in recent years.  Families with loved ones interred there have been worried about neglect and misuse of the cemetery, even as the city has periodically discussed closing the overcrowded space to new burials.  At the same time, visitors have frequently been impressed with the variety of unique votive and grave-marking techniques visible in the space; evidence of these mourning practices and decorative traditions are also being lost.  Dr. Gray will discuss the historical and cultural significance of Holt Cemetery, along with plans for the creation of a digital database that will balance both the needs of those with personal connections to Holt and the interests of others concerned about its long-term


    Dr. Ryan Gray is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Anthropology at the University of New Orleans specializing in historical archaeology. Before receiving his doctorate from the University of Chicago, Dr. Gray was employed for 10 years doing private sector work in cultural resource management with a focus on urban sites. His work examines race, segregation, auto-construction, and urban development in the post-Emancipation South.
     


    http://www.uno.edu/cola/archaeology/planning-underway-for-reburial-ceremony.aspx

    http://archaeologynews.uno.edu/


     


    preservation.

  • 00:58

    Love At Our Roots: How Freedom Became A Force For Change - James H. Commander

    in History

    James H. Commander utilized genealogical research techniques to author his book, Love At Our Roots: How Freedom Became A Force For Change.


    His book has been accepted into the prestigious Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture in New York, as well as, the Auburn Avenue Research Library on African American Culture and History in Atlanta, Georgia. His lecture focuses on using family research to uncover empowering heritage for future generations.


    Commander holds a Bachelor and Master's degree in arts, entertainment and media management from Columbia College of Chicago, Full Sail University.  He resides in Greenville, South Carolina with his family.


     


     

  • 00:59

    Problem Solving in Genealogical Research with Mary M.Tedesco

    in History

     


    Problem Solving in Genealogical Research
    (Strategies / ideas for breaking through your genealogy brick walls.)


    MARY M. TEDESCO is a professional genealogist, speaker, and author. She is a Host / Genealogist on the PBS TV series Genealogy Roadshow (season 2) and the Founder of ORIGINS ITALY. Mary speaks Italian and travels often to Italy to conduct client genealogical research and visit family. Mary is the co-author of Tracing Your Italian Ancestors an 84-page Italian research guide published by Moorshead Magazines. She holds a Bachelor of Arts in Mathematics from Boston University and a Certificate in Genealogical Research from Boston University’s Center for Professional Education. In addition to her Italian ancestry (Calabria, Trentino-Alto Adige, and Tuscany) on her father’s side, she also has deep American roots (German, Irish, Danish & English) on her mother’s side and is proud member of the Daughters of the American Revolution. Mary is a member of a number of local and national genealogical societies and serves on the Board of Directors of the Massachusetts Genealogical Council. She can be contacted at www.originsitaly.com


     

  • 00:59

    Your Family Name Was Not Changed at Ellis Island - Kenneth A. Bravo, JD

    in History

    Why the New York Times is Wrong – Using Basic Genealogy Tools and Methods to Show that Your Family Name Was Not Changed At Ellis Island.


    There is a common misconception, call it an old wives tale or an urban legend, that family names were often changed at Ellis Island.  Such myths gain a great deal of credibility when newspapers such as the New York Times, the country’s “paper of record”, perpetuates these myths by repeating them, in this case in obituaries.


    When Kenneth saw one of these obituaries a few years ago, he wrote to the Times pointing out their error and suggesting sources that they could check to verify what he was saying.  When they seemed to ignore him, he did the research on the family of the person named in the obituary and was able to show what the name was when the family immigrated and how the family name changed as they adapted to life in the United States.  He sent all of the proof to the Times and was still ignored.  Finally the Times responded.  They were not going to do anything to correct the erroneous obituary but suggested they might do a news story on the issue.  The experience led him to do a search of other Times obituaries with the Ellis Island story.  He located about half a dozen.  After doing the research on each, he was able to show the original name for each of them.


    Kenneth A. Bravo received his JD from The Ohio State University, College of Law and his B.A. degree in Economics from Rutgers University, New Brunswick, New Jersey.  He is Vice President of the International Association of Jewish Genealogical Societies (IAJGS) and, the former president and current member of the Board of Trustees of the Jewish Genealogy Society of Cleveland.  Bravo has lectured on a number of genealogical topics.

  • 01:22

    South Carolina Stories: Rennard East, Patricia Lowman Pryor, Elizabeth Robeson

    in History

    The Truth About The Lowman Family Lynchings in Aiken, South Carolina


    Rennard East is a hip hop artist/ songwriter from Philadelphia, PA and one of his new passions is genealogy because he knew nothing about his ancestors when growing up.  Patricia Lowman Pryor has always wondered about the truth concerning her grandmother Bertha Lowman and will share her research and discovery behind this story.


    Historian Elizabeth Robeson - a leading researcher on the Lowman Family Lynchings will provide the political, and social order through which African Americans had to navigate a hostile and dangerous existence in the South. Elizabeth Robeson holds the M.Phil in American history from Columbia University where she was a fellowship doctoral candidate studying under Professor Barbara J. Fields. The Lowman Family Lynchings is the subject of her dissertation and a book manuscript in progress. 


     

  • 01:16

    Records of Post-Civil War Federal Agencies at NARA - Reginald Washington

    in History

    The National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) is the official repository of the permanently valuable records of the U.S. Government.  NARA's vast holdings document the lives and experiences of persons who interacted with the Federal Government.  The records created by post-Civil War Federal Agencies are perhaps some of the most important records available for the study of black family life and genealogy.  This discussion will focus on NARA's Reference Information Paper 108.


    This reference information paper describes three post-Civil War Federal agencies' records: the Bureau of Refugees, Freedmen, and Abandoned Lands; the Freedman's Savings and Trust Company; and the Commissioners of Claims. Case examples will be shared to illustrate the value of researching these important records.


    Reginald Washington is a retired archivist/ genealogy specialist with the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA). He lectures frequently on records and research procedures at the National Archives, and has served as the African-American Genealogy Subject Area Specialist at NARA. He has spoken at conferences of the Afro-American Historical and Genealogical Society, National Genealogical Society, Federation of Genealogical Societies, National Institute on Genealogical Research, and numerous local genealogical societies and clubs. 


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     

  • 00:58

    Using Civil Rights Records to Find The Story in Your Family- Antoinette Harrell

    in History

    Using Civil Rights Records to Find The Story In Your Community and Family


    Please join genealogist and family historian Antoinette Harrell for a discussion of how and why researchers will want to explore the Civil Rights records to find relatives that were engaged in the Civil Rights movement throughout the South.  Ms. Harrell will use a case example of Mr. Herbert Lee a Civil Rights leader from Amite County, Mississippi to illustrate what was documented in Federal Records about him.


    Antoinette Harrell, a renowned genealogist, author and blogger whose genealogical research has been featured on Nightline News, People Magazine and many other national and international public media. Harrell is the host and producer of Nurturing Our Roots Television and Nurturing Our Roots Blog Talk Radio and was appointed Honorary Attorney General in the State of Louisiana in 2003 for her studies in genealogy. She is also one of the recipients of the ASLAH Award in 2013 for her outstanding services as a humanitarian activist and film maker and has been featured in “Chronicle On Civil Rights” & Civil Rights History from the Ground Up: Local Struggles a National Movement.


    The Department of Justice Records are available under the Civil Rights Division at the National Archives.


    The Civil Rights Division of the Department of Justice, created in 1957 by the enactment of the Civil Rights Act of 1957, works to uphold the civil and constitutional rights of all Americans, particularly some of the most vulnerable members of our society. The Division enforces federal statutes prohibiting discrimination on the basis of race, color, sex, disability, religion, familial status and national origin.

  • 00:57

    Using Civil Rights Records to Find the Story with Antoinette Harrell

    in History

    Using Civil Rights Records to Find The Story In Your Community and Family


    Please join genealogist and family historian Antoinette Harrell for a discussion of how and why researchers will want to explore the Civil Rights records to find relatives that were engaged in the Civil Rights movement throughout the South.  Ms. Harrell will use a case example of Mr. Herbert Lee a Civil Rights leader from Amite County, Mississippi to illustrate what was documented in Federal Records about him.


    Antoinette Harrell, a renowned genealogist, author and blogger whose genealogical research has been featured on Nightline News, People Magazine and many other national and international public media. Harrell is the host and producer of Nurturing Our Roots Television and Nurturing Our Roots Blog Talk Radio and was appointed Honorary Attorney General in the State of Louisiana in 2003 for her studies in genealogy. She is also one of the recipients of the ASLAH Award in 2013 for her outstanding services as a humanitarian activist and film maker and has been featured in “Chronicle On Civil Rights” & Civil Rights History from the Ground Up: Local Struggles a National Movement.


    The Department of Justice Records are available under the Civil Rights Division at the National Archives.


    The Civil Rights Division of the Department of Justice, created in 1957 by the enactment of the Civil Rights Act of 1957, works to uphold the civil and constitutional rights of all Americans, particularly some of the most vulnerable members of our society. The Division enforces federal statutes prohibiting discrimination on the basis of race, color, sex, disability, religion, familial status and national origin.