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  • 00:12

    From Zero to 10,000+ Words: Writing A Winning Family History - Leslie Anderson

    in History

     


    Leslie Anderson will discuss how to apply the classic strategy of information-gathering to your research so that you can write a robust family history. She will explain how customized timelines, resource guides, and locality guides can help you with your writing.


    Leslie's research began with one question: "Where was my great-grandfather born?" The answer (and the analysis) culminated in an article that won the 2013 National Genealogical Society Family History Writing Contest. The four-generation narrative "Tabitha (Bugg) George Smith (1838 - ca 1890) of Mecklenburg County, Virginia" was published in the National Genealogical Society Quarterly (March 2015). "It was over 20 pages with more than 10,000 words and 200 citations."


     


     

  • From Zero to 10,000+ Words: Writing A Winning Family History -Leslie Anderson

    in History

    Leslie Anderson will discuss how to apply the classic strategy of information gathering to your research so that you can write a robust family history. She will explain how customized timelines, resource guides, and locality guides can help you with your writing.


    Leslie's research began with one question: "Where was my great -grandfather born"? The answer (and the analysis) culminated in an article that won the 2013 National Genealogyical Society Family History Writitng Contest. The four-generaton narrative "Tabitha (Bugg) George Smith (1838-ca 1890) of Mecklenburg County, Virginia" was published in the National Genealogical Society Quarterly (March 2015). "It was over 20 pages with more than 10,000 words and 200 citations>"


     


     


     

  • 01:05

    Doreen's Jazz, History and Culture with Doreen J. Ketchens

    in History

    Doreen's Jazz New Orleans is a group whose primary interest lies in spreading the culture and traditional music of New Orleans all over the world, through performances and education. Doreen Ketchens, the leader of the group, has been called "Queen Clarinet", "The female Louis Armstrong", and “Lady Louie” by critics who have heard her perform. She has performed with Ellis Marsalis, Jon Faddis, Trombone Shorty, Al Hirt, Dorothy Donagan, The Black Crows and Jennifer Warrens, to name a few. She has opened for such names as Macy Grey and Dr. John.


    Doreen’s Jazz New Orleans has represented New Orleans and the United States around the world, performing in Africa, Asia, Canada, Europe, South America, Central Asia and the United States. They have performed for four United States presidents, including Bill Clinton, George Bush Sr., Ronald Reagan and Jimmy Carter. The band also boasts 23 volumes of CD’s and 3 DVD’s.


    In addition to being superb performers, Doreen and Lawrence are outstanding educators. They regularly perform in schools around the world, educating students of all languages, spreading the culture and music of New Orleans.


    www.doreensjazz.com

  • 01:03

    Reviving the Legacy of Annie Malone with Linda M. Nance and Linda F. Jones

    in History

    Join the Officers of the Annie Malone Historical Society for a discussion about the legacy that has been the driving force in our Black hair and beauty culture today. The purpose of the Annie Malone Historical Society is to give proper recognition to a pillar of history.  To share the story of extraordinary vision, dedication, commitment and success that was the life of Annie M.Turnbo Pope Malone.  To place the accomplishments of this African American icon in one body of evidence that is easily accessible to the public.


     


    Linda M.Nance is the President of the Annie Malone Historical Society and earned a Bachelor Degree in Psychology and a Bachelor Degree in Sociology from Maryville University in St. Louis, Missouri. She holds an Associate in Applied Science Degree (emphases in Human Services/Corrections) from St. Louis Community College at Florissant Valley also in St. Louis, Missouri.  A 2009 graduate of the FOCUS St. Louis Leadership program, Linda has also completed the Community Arts Training and the TIGER Fellowship programs sponsored by the St. Louis Regional Arts Commission. 


     


    Linda F. Jones is the Vice-President of the Annie Malone Historical Society and is a gifted educator, historian, writer, and lecturer.  She received her Master of Business Administration from Indiana University and a Bachelor of Science degree in Business Administration from Calumet College. She is a historian with an insatiable interest in researching the history of African Americans, her own family history, and in particular, the history of Annie Turnbo Pope Malone.   


    http://anniemalonehistoricalsociety.org


     

  • 01:05

    Property Rights and Wrongs with Judy G. Russell

    in History

     Property Rights and Wrongs: African-Americans at the Courthouse with The Legal Genealogist


    From being treated as property to having their property stolen by those who used the law against the freedmen, African Americans' experience at the courthouse had only one bright spot: it created records for the genealogist-descendants.


    A Certified Genealogist with a law degree, The Legal Genealogist Judy G. Russell examines the interplay between genealogy and the law. She is a lecturer, educator and writer who enjoys helping others understand a variety of issues, ranging from using DNA in family history to the effect the law had on our ancestors’ lives and the records they left behind.


    A graduate of George Washington University and Rutgers School of Law-Newark, Judy is a Colorado native with roots deep in the American south on her mother’s side and entirely in Germany on her father’s side. She's a member of the National Genealogical Society, the Association of Professional Genealogists, and, among others, the state genealogical societies of New Jersey, North Carolina, Virginia, Texas and Illinois. She has written for the National Genealogical Society Quarterly and the National Genealogical Society Magazine .

  • 01:30

    A Journey To Discover My Ghanaian Roots with Carol Hector-Harris

    in History

    Many Americans of African descent have thought that connecting with their African kin was next to impossible, yet Carol Hector-Harris has done just that. Not only did she visit Ghana but she also met relatives. She is the fifth great-granddaughter of Africa-born Quock Martrick, who served in the Revolutionary War with George Washington in New York. She found Martrick's family, HER FAMILY, in Big Ada, Ghana. She also met members of her ethnic group, the Ga-Adangbe (the African lineage she discovered through DNA testing), which includes Sangmorkie Tetteh, who is with Carol in the photo.


    Carol Hector-Harris earned a Bachelor of Arts in Journalism and a Master of Arts in Political Science from The Ohio State University. Currently she is working toward a Ph.D. at Ohio University’s Scripps College of Communication. An eleventh generation Bostonian, she lives in Columbus, Ohio with her husband, two sons, and eight grandchildren. Ms. Hector-Harris serves as the librarian for a Columbus Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution.

  • 01:30

    Organizing and Analyzing Your Autosomal DNA Results with Diahan Southard

    in History

    Have you had your autosomal DNA tested and now you are confused?  Allow Diahan Southard to explain how you can organize, analyze and understand your results.


    In the year 2000 Diahan Southard found herself in the right place at the right time.  As an undergraduate in Microbiology, the laboratory she had been volunteering in was headed to Egypt to collect more samples for genetic study from an abandoned cemetery just outside of Cairo. While that trip never materialized, that research study became the foundation of the Sorenson Molecular Genealogy Foundation (SMGF), for whom she would work for the next 10 years.


    Her duties at SMGF and her sister companies were varied, from laboratory work to marketing to customer service. All of her knowledge and experience have culminated into her current position as Your DNA Guide. She writes for Family Tree Magazine, and is the Genetic Gem at Lisa Louise Cooke’s Genealogy Gems, blogging and podcasting about DNA and genealogy.


    Diahan's lectures are always fun, upbeat, and full of energy.  She has a passion for genetic genealogy, a genuine love for people, and a gift for making the technical understandable.


    guide@yourDNAguide.com


    www.yourDNAguide.com


     

  • 01:05

    The Ultimate Family History Interview Primer with Nicka Smith

    in History

    Nicka Smith is a professional photographer, speaker, and documentarian with more than 16 years of experience as a genealogist. She has extensive experience in African ancestored genealogy, reverse genealogy, and family reunion planning and execution. She is also an expert in genealogical research in the Northeastern Louisiana area, sharing genealogy with youth, documenting the ancestral journey, and employing the use of new technology in genealogy and family history research.

  • 01:01

    A Chosen Exile: A History of Racial Passing in America - Allyson Hobbs, Ph.D.

    in History

    Rebroadcast


    A Chosen Exile: A History of Racial Passing in American Life, published by Harvard University Press, examines the phenomenon of racial passing in the United States from the late eighteenth century to the present.


    Allyson Hobbs is an assistant professor in the history department at Stanford.  She graduated magna cum laude from Harvard and she received a Ph.D. with distinction from the University of Chicago.  She has received fellowships from the Ford Foundation, the Clayman Institute for Gender Research, and the Center for the Comparative Study of Race and Ethnicity at Stanford.  Allyson teaches courses on American identity, African American history, African American women’s history, and twentieth century American history. She has won numerous teaching awards including the Phi Beta Kappa Teaching Prize.  She has appeared on C-Span and National Public Radio and her work has been featured on cnn.com and slate.com.  

  • 01:23

    The 371st Infantry of World War I with Sonya Hodges and Douglas Culbreth

    in History

    Do you know about the African American 371st Infantry of World War I that fought in France?  Did you know that Sonya R. Hodges has dedicated her life to research and honor the men who fought in World War I to honor the memory of these dedicated soldiers?


    Please join Sonya R. Hodges-Grantham and Douglas Culbreth for a discussion of the role played by the African American 371st Infantry Regiment in World War I to honor the memory of these dedicated soldiers.


    The 371st Infantry Regiment, an African American unit of mostly South Carolinians came from small towns like Sandy Springs, Anderson, Edgefield, Ninety-six and Laurens.


    The 371st was permitted to fight, after disembarking from their troop ship at a tiny French village in April of 1918 after learning that they had been transferred to the French army.  The 371st was given French equipment, and had to turn in their prized Springfield rifles for French rifles. The unit was reorganized to fit the French army structure and spent the spring of 1918 training in French tactics, communicated via interpreters. That summer, the regiment was put into the line to relieve exhausted French and allied Italian units.  


    Sonya Renae Hodges- Grantham is a mother, grandmother, genealogist, author, graver, historian, and researcher, with a motto of "Get The Job Done and Get It Done Right". She is the Founder and President of the World War I - 371st Historical Society. She is  also the Founder of Cornbread Jubilee, an annual event that is held in honor of the corn crop, agriculture, and farming and Co-Founder of the Veterans Formation (1993) Columbia, South Carolina.  She is sole Restorer/Curator of Childs Cemetery in South Carolina and has also authored two books.


     

  • 01:09

    So What? Dr. Shelley Murphy

    in History

    Have you searched for records and finally found that special person you have been looking for?  So what?  What does the record tell you?  Is this all that you need?


    Join Dr. Shelley Murphy, aka "familytreegirl" for a discussion on the "SO WHAT" concept?  "So What" is a concept used in the Midwestern African American Genealogy Institute to help analyze genealogical records and resources. The goal is to question the value of the evidence and plan the path to new leads and discoveries. 


    Shelley Murphy, aka "familytreegirl" is a native of Michigan. Shelley has been an avid genealogist for over 25 years researching the Davis, Marsh, Goens/Goins/Goings, Roper, Boyer, Worden, Cureton, & Murphy, etc. family lines. She attends and presents at local and national conferences and currently works for a nonprofit and serves as adjunct faculty at Averett University. In addition, Shelley is a founding member and current President of the Afro-American Historical Genealogical Society Chapter of Central Virginia.