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  • 00:31

    Raising a child with ASD/Autism

    in Parents

       In continuing observance of April, Autism Awareness Month, today Dr. Annie Abram will interview Alina Rodescu-Pitchon, a mother of 26 old Ben about the challenges and rewords of raising a child with ASD.
    Alina Rodescu-Pitchon was born in Bucharest, Romania and emigrated to the US with her family as a child in 1964. She graduated from Columbia University Graduate School of Architecture and Planning to go on to work in NYC. After working at I.M.Pei & Partners, Costas Kondylis, and Gal Nauer Architects, she now heads her own design practice, Pitchon Design Group. She is the proud mom of Ben, 26, and lives in Wilton, CT.

  • 00:48

    BE SAFE, Safety and Rights Education for Individuals with Autism

    in Family

    Emily Iland, M.A. is an award-winning author, advocate, film-maker, researcher and leader in the autism field. She’s the Past President of the Autism Society of Los Angeles and an Adjunct Professor in the Department of Special Education at California State University, Northridge. Emily is the mother of a young man with ASD (Tom Iland), and brings personal experience and insight to her professional roles.

    Learn more about BE SAFE The Movie and BE SAFE Teaching Edition at www.BeSafeTheMovie.com

    All Autism Talk (allautismtalk.com) is sponsored by Autism Spectrum Therapies (autismtherapies.com) and Trellis Services (trellisservices.com) and Learn It Systems (learnitsystems.com)

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    in Current Events

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  • The Parker J Cole Show -- How to Make Your Church Autistic Friendly

    in Entertainment

    When my nephew was about two years old, at some point, we realized that he wasn't talking. He would mumble incoherently. The kids at church in the nursery, when he attempted to speak, did not understand him. Concerned about this, we took him to the doctor and we discovered he had autism.

    I had no idea what that meant. I'd heard of autism. In fact, there was another child who had it at the church too. So I knew of it but what did it mean? Through early intervention, counseling, and other methods, he is growing up to be able to interact with people and develop interpersonal relationships. Yet, some of the children at the church (where most of his time spent) were standoffish toward him. For a while even, there was some bullying involved too. As an auntie, this upset me (more than I can put here in this box) but it made me realize that churches need to be sensitive to children and adults who have various brain disorders. 

    According to AutismSpeaks.org, "Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and autism are both general terms for a group of complex disorders of brain development." Furthermore, "..1 in 68 American children as on the autism spectrum–a ten-fold increase in prevalence in 40 years." Chances are, there will be a child in your congregation who has autism. What can a congregation do to make their church autistic friendly?

    Join me as I discuss this with Stephen J. Bedard of Hope's Reason Ministries. Call in at 646-595-2083, press 1 to be live on air. Click on the link here:http://tobtr.com/s/7920617, or download the mobile app. Tune in! 

  • 00:30

    Invisibly Autistic: The Surprising Truth About "Seeming Normal"

    in Social Sciences

    In this episode of AspieFriendly, Lorin Neikirk explores a phenomenon that isn't often addressed: Invisible Autism.

    When someone knowing very little about autsim thinks about ASD, they usually think of children who spin and hand flap and either talk incessantly about trains (or dinosaurs or the weather) or who don't speak at all. All of these things may be true for some, but there is a whole group of people with autism who don't "seem" very autistic at all. Are they any less so? Not exactly, They simply present in a different way. Those with Aspergers often fall squarely in this category. Women with Aspergers even more so. It may surprise NTs to learn that some on the spectrum can seem so "normal" that others on the spectrum may not initially realize they are autistic. Women with autism quite often "fly under the radar" regarding detection. 

    Prompted by a conversation between Neikirk and her young-adult son (both of whom have Aspergers) this episode of AspieFriendly takes a closer look at what it's like to be Invisibly Autistic. Why does it happen, what are the pros and cons, and what do we do when we're faced with a difficult situation because of it? 

    Join us as we talk about these things and more, in Invisibly Autistic: The Surprising Truth About "Seeming Normal".

  • Women's Power Hour: Dealing with An Autistic Person

    in Family

    What is Autism?

    Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) is a complex neurological disorder that typically appears in the first three years of life. Though every case is unique, ASD typically impacts the ability of a person to socially interact with others, and can (though not always) bring with it a variety of learning difficulties.

    Like many other neurological disorders, cases of ASD vary widely in severity. Some people with ASD develop significant language and communication difficulties before the age of three. Others do not have these challenges but still experience significant problems with social skills and nonverbal communication. The scope and severity of these symptoms can change over time, with an individual experiencing leaps of progress or serious regression at different stages of his or her development.

    Quest: Debi.  She is a stay at home mom of 2.  For years she was told her younger son had ADD but she instinctually felt that it wasn't accurate.  Finally he was identified as having autism after years,.  Since then, she and her family worked through many challenges.  She will be sharing how they overcame the daily struggles of having an autistic child. 

  • 00:30

    Shifting Gears: Autism, Science, and the Homework Debate

    in Parents

    Homework. Ever since public schools have been in existance it has probably been a source of contention between kids, parents and teachers. Unfortunately, for students with autism, the problem reaches much farther than the "I don't wanna"s. And now, a recent study says what Lorin Neikirk has been voicing for over a decade: lots of homework has issues. Big ones.

    Denise Pope, senior lecturer at the Stanford Graduate School of Education, and co-author of the study, says "We found a clear connection between the students' stress and physical impacts -- migraines, ulcers and other stomach problems, sleep deprivation and exhaustion, and weight loss." (Full study was published in the Journal of Experimental Education.) 

    But what about the student on the spectrum? They love to learn... Seem so bright... Surely THEY just love homework, right? Not necessarily. The needs of autistic students are somewhat unique, even in light of the study.


    Join Lorin Neikirk as we delve into what homework works, what doesn't, and what should be avoided entirely in this episode of Aspie Friendly on BlogTalkRadio.


  • 01:00

    Savannah Nicole Logsdon-Breakstone - MH, DD, ASD & Disability Advocacy

    in Culture

    Join The Arc of Luzerne County for a conversation with Savannah Nicole Logsdon-Breakstone. Savannah began advocating at the age of 12, when her mother asked her to sit on a panel for a a state level conference presentation. Advocacy became a true passion for Savannah once she became an adult.  Co-morbidly diagnosed GAD, PTSD, and ASD (Asperger’s), she worked in Mental Health advocacy before she connected with the ASD and DD communities.

    Other advocacy as well as community involvements have included national and state level organizations and advisories, various county level advisories, and Freelance Advocacy efforts.  Savannah is an active member of ASAN (Autistic Self Advocacy Network) and SAU1 (Self Advocates United as 1). 

    Savannah is also a Freelance Writer and Social Media Specialist. She blogs at Cracked Mirror in Shalott and you can connect with her on Twitter, Facebook and LinkedIn.

  • 00:48

    The LNP Show S1E36 #Pretenders

    in Family

    Join Ted Hicks (Dad, Husband & Son) as he moderates the #LNPShow that discusses the latest trends and game changers in parenting, technology, education, sports & product reviews.

    805p Trabian Shorters is founder and CEO of BMe, a growing network of all races and genders committed to building better communities across the U.S. They are co-editors of the 2015 bestseller, “REACH: 40 Black Men Speak on Living, Leading & Succeeding.” (www.reachwithus.com)

    830p Dr. Harold Reitman's latest book, Aspertools, offers easy, effective tools to understand and manage life with children affected by what is now the world's fastest growing developmental disability. autism spectrum disorder (ASD). 

    845p Rosalyn Ross - Media Personality & our favorite Yoga / Fitness instructor provides us with some healthy lifestyle tips.  We'll try to squeeze in an NBA question or two! 

    Tune in LIVE every WEDNESDAY at 8PM ET/ 5PM PT. To call in and be a part of the experience or listen via your mobile phone - Dial 347-857-1947.  Stream us 24/7 at http://www.blogtalkradio.com/happyhournetwork to listen!

  • 00:58

    Through the Eye's of a Sibling; Autism Spectrum Disorder

    in Health

    The Two Trees is a poignant story that gives a glimpse into the difficulties of having a high-functioning Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) child in the family. As told from a sibling perspective, it is both an exploration and celebration of brotherly love despite challenging circumstances, metaphorically reflected in the growth of two trees planted at the beginning of the story. The Two Trees is a must-read for all parents and kids, ASD families, educators, and anyone who has witnessed or felt the sting of being left out, bullied, or misunderstood. 

    Join me on The Keep It Moving Blog Talk Radio Show with special guest Sally Meadows, singer, song writer, author and more importantly a mother. Hear her experiences raising 2 boys and the story behind her new childrens book The Two Trees. 

  • 01:06

    Amy Donaldson - Autism / ASD SocialsibS Project at Portland State University

    in Family

    Today we welcome Dr. Amy Donaldson to Autism Empowerment Radio to talk about the SocialsibS project, a Social Communication Intervention offered through the Portland State University Autism and Child Language Disorders Research Lab and the Speech & Language Clinic. The SocialsibS project is funded by a Treatment Grant from Autism Speaks.

    Social and communicative competence is central to success in school and fundamental to development of peer relationships. Social communication deficits are well documented in children with ASD. Improving these skills is often a key focus of intervention, but generalization can be challenging. Two social communication intervention methods that have been found effective in recent years include:

    * Training peers, or in this case, siblings, to use strategies to facilitate the social communication of children with ASD (sibling-mediated intervention)

    * Use of video-modeling to directly teach social communication skills to the child with ASD.

    To increase generalization of skills, the SocialsibS project combines both of these methods in one intervention. 

    The program is currently inviting children with autism spectrum disorder (ages 4 - 7) and their sibling (ages 5 - 10) for participation in the SocialsibS project at PSU.

    Contact Amy: (503) 725-3224 or email: adonald@pdx.edu

    Amy L. Donaldson, Ph.D., CCC-SLP is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Speech & Hearing Sciences at Portland State University (PSU) and Director of PSU Autism and Child Language Disorders Laboratory. Her research focuses on the assessment and intervention of social communication skills in children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) within the natural environment, as well as intervention efficacy.