• 00:19

    GLMX #177: Aristotle and True Happiness

    in Christianity

    In his classic titled, "How to Read a Book", Mortimer J. Adler summarizes the Greek philosopher Aristotle's views on happiness. He says: 
      
    "Aristotle's definition of happiness is the happiness of the whole life both in the temporal and the eternal. Happiness is the whole of the good, not the highest of the good. It does not consist in self-perfection or self-improvement. For Aristotle, happiness is a quality of a whole life -- whole not only in a temporal sense, but in all the aspects of a life. A happy man is a man who puts it all together and keeps it together. This is the controlling insight of Aristotle's writings."
      
    According to Merriam-Webster, happiness is: a state of well-being and contentment; a pleasurable or satisfying experience; it is the feeling of pleasure and enjoyment because of life.
     
    If there is one thing that people desire in life, perhaps more than anything else, it is happiness. We know that money cannot buy happiness. Just recently, a Wall Street investor gave away his fortune of $800 million and then jumped from a building, committing suicide. 
      
    Numerous books, television shows, radio broadcasts, articles, and studies have been done on how people can be happy. Some people say that happiness comes from having everything you want. Others say happiness comes from being in loving relationships. Still others say happiness comes from doing good. 
      
    Aristotle, and other great philosophers of the past, spent much of their time thinking about the big questions of life. What is the meaning of life? What is man's purpose in life? How can man be happy in life? Where did man come from? Where does man go after he dies? 
     
    .....

  • 00:30

    Aristotle Discussion

    in Culture

    Aristotles 3 main categories of friendship

  • 01:20

    Q&A: Aristotle, Evil Siblings, Studying Philosophy, and More

    in Self Help

    Philosopher Dr. Diana Hsieh answered questions on Aristotle on the final end, dealing with a morally corrupt sibling, studying philosophy in academia, the legality of DDoS attacks, and more in this episode of Philosophy in Action Radio. 

    Question 1: Is Aristotle's argument for flourishing as the final end valid? 

    Question 2: How should I respond to my morally corrupt sister? 

    Question 3: Is studying philosophy in academia a waste? 

    Question 4: Should Distributed Denial of Service (a.k.a. DDoS) attacks be illegal? 

    To download or feed a high-quality version of this episode, plus show notes and other details, visit its archive page. 

    For more from Dr. Diana Hsieh on the application of rational principles to the challenges of real life, visit PhilosophyInAction.com.

  • 01:01

    Chat: Responsibility & Luck, Chapter Five

    in Self Help

    Philosopher Dr. Diana Hsieh discussed "Responsibility & Luck, Chapter Five" with listeners in this episode of Philosophy in Action Radio. 

    In Chapter Three of the Nicomachean Ethics, Aristotle develops the outlines of a theory of moral responsibility. He argues that responsibility requires (1) control and (2) knowledge. In Chapter Five of my book, Responsibility & Luck: A Defense of Praise and Blame, I explored and further developed this theory of responsibility. In our discussion of this chapter, we'll explore this theory in depth, considering twists and turns like the role of regret and involuntary ignorance and incapacity.

    To download or feed a high-quality version of this episode, plus show notes and other details, visit its archive page. 

    For more from Dr. Diana Hsieh on the application of rational principles to the challenges of real life, visit PhilosophyInAction.com.

  • 02:01

    HUMP DAY SHOW -SPECIAL GUEST ="MICHAEL ARISTOTLE"

    in Music

    INTERVIEW AND MUSIC FROM " MICHAEL ARISTOTLE"


    HOST BY "BOUNCEBACK VON"

  • 01:09

    Q&A: Racism, Aristotle, Abortion, Marriage, and More

    in Self Help

    Philosopher Dr. Diana Hsieh answered questions on solutions to widespread racism, recommended works of Aristotle, veto power over abortion, staying in a marriage, and more in this episode of Philosophy in Action Radio. 

    Question 1: Should the government intervene when widespread racism makes life impossible for some people? 

    Question 2: What works of Aristotle do you recommend reading? 

    Question 3: Should a man be able to prevent his pregnant girlfriend from aborting his baby? 

    Question 4: If a married couple wouldn't marry again, should they split? 

    To download or feed a high-quality version of this episode, plus show notes and other details, visit its archive page. 

    For more from Dr. Diana Hsieh on the application of rational principles to the challenges of real life, visit PhilosophyInAction.com.

  • 02:01

    In the beginning was the (Spoken) word and it became flesh!

    in Current Events

    Poetry as an art form may predate literacy.[1] The earliest poetry is believed to have been recited or sung, employed as a way of remembering oral history, genealogy, and law.
    The oldest surviving speculative fiction poem is the Tale of the Shipwrecked Sailor,[5] written in Hieratic and ascribed a date around 2500 B.C.E
    The Tale of the Shipwrecked Sailor is a Middle Kingdom story of an Ancient Egyptian voyage to "the King's mines" .
    The Middle Kingdom of Egypt (also known as The Period of Reunification) is the period in the history of ancient Egypt between about 2000 BC and 1700 BC, stretching from the establishment of the Eleventh Dynasty to the end of the Twelfth Dynasty, although some writers include the Thirteenth and Fourteenth dynasties in the Second Intermediate Period. During this period, Osiris became the most important deity in popular religion.[
    Classical thinkers employed classification as a way to define and assess the quality of poetry. Notably, Aristotle's Poetics describes the three genres of poetry: the epic, comic, and tragic.Extract from a 3,000 year-old papyrus. The blue lootus
    She is one girl, there is no one like her. She is more beautiful than any other. Look, she is like a star goddess arising at the beginning of a happy new year; brilliantly white, bright skinned; with beautiful eyes for looking, with sweet lips for speaking; she has not one phrase too many. With a long neck and white breast, her hair of genuine lapis lazuli; her arm more brilliant than gold; her fingers like lotus flowers, with heavy buttocks and girt waist. Her thighs offer her beauty, with a brisk step she treads on ground. She has captured my heart in her embrace. She makes all men turn their necks to look at her. One looks at her passing by,this one, the unique one

  • 00:26

    Leveling the Playing Field - The biological Equal!

    in Health

    The true equal is by fostering the unequal from societal perspective.  The sure fire way to get it as close to the equal as possible creating a Win-Win scenario. As esoteric as  that may sound (read)...I have a point. 


    There is a way to get it as close as possible without tearing down the good ones to achieve said goal!


     


     

  • 00:35

    Chat: Responsibility & Luck, Chapter Four

    in Self Help

    Philosopher Dr. Diana Hsieh discussed "Responsibility & Luck, Chapter Four" with listeners in this episode of Philosophy in Action Radio. 

    The purpose of a theory of moral responsibility is to limit moral judgments of persons to their voluntary doings, products, and qualities. However, moral judgments are not the only – or even the most common – judgments of people we commonly make. So what are the various kinds of judgments we make of other people? What are the distinctive purposes and demands of those judgments? What is the relationship between those judgments and a person's voluntary actions, outcomes, and traits? I answered these questions and more in this discussion of Chapter Four of my book,Responsibility & Luck: A Defense of Praise and Blame. 

    To download or feed a high-quality version of this episode, plus show notes and other details, visit its archive page. 

    For more from Dr. Diana Hsieh on the application of rational principles to the challenges of real life, visit PhilosophyInAction.com.

  • 01:51

    16Bit Assassins Ep 7: My Girlfriend knows who Aristotle is!

    in Video Games

    It's Friday and you know what that means, another episode of the 16 Bit Assassins. Tune in as we discuss live classic gaming and industry ridiculousness. All on Episode 7 of the 16Bit Assassins: My Girlfriend knows who Aristotle is!

  • 00:26

    Do You Know the Language of Persuasion? - Part 1

    in Youth

    Join the Young Media Critics as they ask you "Do You Know the Language of Persuasion? Part 1 of a 3 part series. 


    The goal of most media messages is to persuade the audience to believe or do something. Hollywood movies use expensive special effects to make us believe that what we’re seeing is real. News stories use several techniques – such as direct quotation of identified sources – to make us believe that the story is accurate.  These "persuaders" use a variety of techniques to grab our attention, to establish credibility and trust, to stimulate desire for the product or policy, and to motivate us to act (buy, vote, give money, etc.) 


    We call these techniques the "language of persuasion.” They’re not new; Aristotle wrote about persuasion techniques more than 2000 years ago, and they’ve been used by speakers, writers, and media makers for even longer than that.


    Tune in on Tuesday, July 8, 2014 at 5 p.m. and learn about the "language of Persuasion!  Call in to join the discussion: 347-633-9114! 

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