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  • 00:31

    2nd Episode of the U.P. Schlock Show: 1950s Vampire Films & Halloween Retro

    in Film

    The 2nd episode of the U.P. Schlock is going to be about 1950s Vampire Films and Halloween Retro! I'll be talking about Christopher Lee's performance to name one from the 50s. For Halloween Retro I'll be looking at different facts, fun recipes, and other Halloween vintage things! So come and join the Shrieking Ghoul (a new horror host).

  • 00:58

    The 1950s

    in Entertainment

    we look back at Disney in the 1950s (Note:this is a rerecording, old episode was deleted)

  • 00:25

    Live :Jamaica Foundation music Reggae from 1950s-1970s

    in Music

    Live :Jamaica Foundation music   Reggae from 1950s-1970s jamaican music from the 50s 60s 70s all great music  just for the soul . great history  great memories

  • 00:23

    Golden Age Of Radio Series Jack Benny "Sorry Wrong Number" October 17, 1948

    in Comedy

    Golden Age Of Radio Series features the amazingly hilarious thoughts of Jack Benny with this episode titled "Sorry Wrong Number". This episode aired as thousands turned their radios on the night of October 17th, 1948.


    Jack Benny (born Benjamin Kubelsky February 14, 1894 - December 26, 1974) was an American comedian, vaudevillian, and actor for radio, television, and film.

    Widely recognized as one of the leading American entertainers of the 20th century, Benny was known for his comic timing and his ability to get laughs with either a pregnant pause or a single expression, such as his signature exasperated "Well!" His radio and television programs, tremendously popular in the 1930s, 1940s and 1950s, were a foundational influence on the situation comedy.

  • 01:17

    Our Virtual Front Porch

    in Social Networking

    Host Faith Chatham presents special guest Texas Radio Hall of Fame broadcaster Tony Bridge, Jr. and newspaper woman, author, civil rights activist and former radio station news director Gail K. Beil. We'll look back over the past 60 years of media and compare it with today. Mr. Tony Bridge, Jr. acquired ownership of an AM/FM station in the East Texas market in the 1950s. Faith and Gail met in the early 1970s while employed at a Harte Hanks Communication daily newspaper in that same market. Together Gail and Faith have worked for at least 5 national newspaper chains. Tony experiences extends far beyond his local station. Faith has owned and operated creative shops, independent "full-serviice" advertising agencies and marketing companies, and served as media consultant for DFW based Fortune 500 Companies. At one time Gail was the News Director at a Radio Station in Marshall, Texas in competition with Tony Bridge's station. Gail has done advance work for Bill Moyers, covered environmental, political, education and historical beats. She is best known as the biographer of James Farmer, Jr. and was recently awarded the Denzel Washington Team Support Award for her service to the Wiley Great Debaters. This will be a live show. When these three old friends get together, the conversation is usually brisk, informative, unpredictable, and humorous!

  • 00:31

    Let's Talk About Love (Baby)!

    in Self Help

    "Love Is a Many Splendored Thing"  was both a movie and song title from the 1950s. The movie was about the complications of love relationships and prejudice. For many people defining and understanding what it means to give and receive "love" is an insurrmountable task.


    Love is a variety of different feelings and attitudes that range from affection to pleasure, from a virtue -representing human kindness and compassion- to a way of describing actions towards the self or others. Truly loving ourselves and others is not an easy task.  


    Today's show is all about love.  We'll discuss how it feels, what it means, and how best to give and receive love. Join us in our talk about love, baby!

  • 02:02

    Live 325 Billboards Top Singles of the 1950s with Vanessa and Ron

    in Self Help

    Join Vanessa Hewko and Ron Ash as they count around the Billboard top singles of the 1950s.

  • 00:27

    East Bound , Homeward Bound

    in Music

    Playing Forgotten Music on 78 RPM Records by Curt Hahn


    East Bound, Homeward Bound


    Ken Griffin ‎ Sentimental Journey


    The Four Aces: “Arizona Moon”


    Gene Krupa and His Orchestra ‎ Along the Navajo Trail


    Ken Griffin ‎St. Louis Blues


    All credit due to the Artists, Musicians and Record Companies  


    No profit or income derived from this podcast.


    Have a historic 78 RPM and story you want to share with my listeners?  Contact me at:


    www.facebook.com/s3productions2 or oscssw@juno.com


    Ken Griffin ‎Sentimental Journey / St. Louis Blues


    Label Broadcast Recordings, Catalog # 430 -4005 1956


    A: Sentimental Journey


    B: St. Louis Blues


     


    The Four Aces is an American male traditional pop music quartet, popular since the 1950s.


     Over the last half-century, the group amassed many gold records. Its million-selling signature tunes


     Include "Love is a Many-Splendored Thing", Three Coins in the Fountain "Stranger in Paradise”


    Why”, and "(It's No) Sin".


    "Arizona Moon”


    Victoria Records V-101B 1951


    Written Alberts-McCall


    Gene Krupa “Along the Navajo Trail”


    Vocals [Chorus] – Buddy Stewart


    Gene Krupa may not have been the most advanced drummer of the 1930s but he was in some ways the most significant. 


    "Along the Navajo Trail” written by Dick Charles Larry Markes and Edgar De Lange in 1945. It was the title song of the 1945 Roy Rogers film “Along the Navajo trail.”


    Columbia 36846 June 14 1945 

  • 01:00

    Race in 21st Century America

    in Politics

    Good evening, tomorrow on The Meter, we will discuss race in contemporary America. With the death of Freddie Gray in Baltimore, on the heals of Michael Brown, the ensuing riots, and indictments of six Baltimore police officers, is America back in abyss of racial strife resembling the 1950s and 60s? With the Civil Rights coalition pressuring the Baltimore District Attorney's officer, will,the trial of the officers be fair. Please join us at 9:00 AM. The call in number is 347-308-8933. Your input is essential. 

  • 01:21

    Gerald Gardner's High Magic's Aid

    in Radio

    On Thursday May 7th, 2015 the Hermetic Hour with host Poke Runyon will review and discuss Gerald Gardner's classic novel of medieval magick and witchcraft in England "High Magic's Aid." We consider this a very important work in the Modern Hermetic
    Tradition because it vividly describes the synthesis of surviving Paganism with the Solomonic school of ceremonial magick in the Middle Ages. A mix of esoteric themes that returned in the form of Gardenarian and Alexandrian Wicca in 1950s England, from which it quickly migrated to the United States. Gerald Gardner was a member of the O.T.O. and worked closely with Aleister Crowley to produce the first modern Book of Shadows. High Magic's Aid tells the story of three Saxon Solomonic magicians in the days of Robin Hood's King John 11th century, who are not able to work their magick effectively without the help of a female Witch. They rescue their priestess from the local inquisition and dig up her precious Athame and white handled knife without which they can not operate. The story is very well written and well researched. Better than Crowley's fiction although he was probably Gardner's editor. We strongly recommend this book to our neo-pagan and wiccan friends who may think that witchcraft and magick cannot co-exist. They can, and they did, and they do -- so
    if you want to know where and how the wizards and the witches got together tune in and "Merry Meet!" and "Blessed Be!"
     

  • 01:42

    History Today

    in News

    On the inaugural edition of History Today, host Paul Angel, the managing editor of The Barnes Review (TBR) history magazine, will be discussing a variety of historical matters with an eye toward how they affect our lives today.


    The riots in Ferguson and Baltimore are still on everyone’s mind. The media seems obsessed with giving a forum to disgruntled blacks who are having a hard time admitting that one’s life is what one makes of it.  (And one’s culture, as well.) Besides the bugaboos of “white entitlement” and “white racism,” slavery, of course, is the “reason” many blacks use to justify the sad state of the urban areas in which they dwell.


    With that in mind, we will be discussing several historical events that deny this narrative.


    Hundreds of thousands of Irish were sold into slavery by the British and brought to North America and the Caribbean. The men were literally worked to death, and the women used to produce an army of half-breed slaves. The Irish were the first slaves brought to the New World—not the Africans.  But somehow, the Irish overcame this and thrived in America.


    Michael Rockefeller, the son of the late Nelson Rockefeller, ventured off to Papua/New Guinea in the last 1950s and early 1960s to collect the art of the head-hunting cannibal Asmat people of the island. What happened to him after that is one of the great missing person’s cases of the 20th century. But now that case has been solved—and it is a shocker.


    We will be discussing the black Asmat people and their strange and violent culture which bears an amazing resemblance to the culture of inner-city black America.


    With Paul will be his partner in historical crime, Dave Gahary, the host of “Who’s the Bad Guy?”


    Please join us and take a politically incorrect tour through history from a non-mainstream perspective.