• 02:20

    Severity of the Ebola Outbreaks and the vulnerability of the African States

    in Health

    The Ebola outbreak, which began 9 months ago, has killed nearly 1300 lives in 4 African countries, affected up to 2000 people, shut down borders, and is becoming a threat to local if not national economies. Though ‘The Economists’ reports patchy precautions following Presidency declared state of emergency in these countries, personal testimonies are disclosing their satisfaction at their government’s serious efforts in protecting their citizens.


    Special Guest From Liberia Madam Miatta Fahnbulleh


    Combining a passion for performance with an acute social consciousness, Miatta Fahnbulleh is helping Liberia’s next generation move out of the shadow of war.


    Special Guest From Nigeria


    Dr. Katch Ononuju is man of many interests. He is the Managing Director/ Chief Economist at iordinance, which is into economic consultancy, large scale military hardware supply and security consultancy. He is also a Public Affairs Analyst with a doctorate degree from the prestigious London School of Economics and Political Science. Interestingly, he is also a politician and chieftain of the ruling PDP.


    See detail here: http://bit.ly/AV-WEN-Ebola

  • 02:01

    Observing the Roles of African Men in Community Building and Developing Healthy

    in Dads and Family

    There is an overarching stereotype about the absence of African men in family and community development. Some claim that African "Black" males have failed to protect their communities while some say African leaders are the ones failing to protect their societies.  Is there some validity is this stereotype?


    However, history portrays Africa as an organized society where males prided themselves in protecting their communities. This character trait dates as far back as pre-colonial days were men were more socio-politically visible than women and in some societies; even though they deferred some of the sociopolitical roles to women. In those societies, women were allowed to make decisions pertaining to women affairs, but in general, men played various roles as councilmen, elders, and as a matter of fact, as those responsible for guarding the living from the forces of evil.


    How do character traits of today's men differ from those of our ancestors? What have we forgotten to remember? Is it good to remember and continue to observe the cultural legacy and behavioral commitments of the ancestors? Is it possible to combine the Afrocentric governance with those of our ancestors? From the look of things, corrupt governments, killings, etc., it appears black leaders have moved too far from the good traditional practices of their ancestors. If this is the case, then who protects black communities? Should those good traditional protective roles be abandoned? Will electoral processes work in black communities, particularly, in Africa? Where do we go from here?


    . The program is co-directed and co-produced by African Views.


    http://bit.ly/africanmen

  • 02:01

    PEACE TALKS: African Amer­i­cans and Black Immi­grants

    in Radio

    The diversity of African people is defined by their uniqueness, which is one of their most important characteristics as a people. In the US, Black or African American is one category. Together they comprise approximately 14% of the population in the United States. One would expect synergy from the various groups that constitute the Black society in America. This includes Black immigrants from Africa, South America, Australia, the Caribbean, Europe, Asia, and African Americans. Current reality as revealed by pundits and mere public observation show that relating to one another in their respective communities is a common challenge.


    The existing conflicts are both recent and antiquity based myths such as claims that African Americans don't like Black immigrants because they are reaping the benefit of their struggles for freedom with disregard for the experience of slavery while Black immigrants are said to think that African Americans are aloof of the opportunity of their circumstances. Other myths include the Willie Lynch’s effect and conspiracy theory of who might have been responsible for slave trade.


     


    Click here to read detail 

  • 02:16

    The Forbidden Books (Boko Haram) Nigeria's War on Terror

    in Radio

    What ISIS is to Iraq AND Syria, and Al-Qaida is to Afghanistan, that is what Boko Haram is to Nigeria.  This diffuse Salafist sect has attacked Nigeria's police and military, politicians, schools, religious buildings, public institutions, market places, and civilians consistently in Northern Nigeria, but they have since gained confidence and now encroaching Southern parts of Nigeria. They have abducted several hundreds of children, women and girls to the world’s disgusts and destroyed townships, while they put terror in the hearts of Nigerian law enforcement institutions.  Up until few days ago, the Nigerian Government had denied the obvious advancement and atrocities caused by Boko Haram perhaps as political strategy amidst the very heated and looming presidential election coming up in few weeks.


    Experts argue that the group existence is due to the fundamental Salafist incubation that social development neglect of the region brewed. Others view the group as an armed revolt against government corruption, abusive security forces, and widening regional economic disparity. Most agree that the Federal Government of Nigeria could have and should have done more to address the strife.


    Read more

  • 02:59

    Pan-African Journal: Worldwide Radio Broadcast

    in Politics

    Listen to this Pan-African Journal worldwide radio broadcast hosted by Abayomi Azikiwe, editor of the Pan-African News Wire. This edition features our regular PANW reports examining developments surrounding MLK Day 2015 in the United States as well as events in Yemen, the Democratic Republic of Congo, Somalia and Tunisia. The second hour continues our monthlong tribute to the 86th anniversary of the birth of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. who was commemorated across the country this week. In the final hour an archived edition of the Jan. 4, 2015 Pan-African Journal New York City version will be highlighted. The program was hosted by Abayomi Azikiwe and produced by Bernard White of Community Progressive Radio CPRMetro.org in New York City.  

  • 02:59

    Pan-African Journal: Special Worldwide Radio Broadcast

    in Politics

    Listen to this special edition of the Pan-African Journal worldwide radio broadcast hosted by Abayomi Azikiwe, editor of the Pan-African News Wire. We will bring to you our regular PANW segment featuring reports on developments in South Africa, Egypt, Nigeria and Greece. In the second and third hours we conclude our series commemorating the 86th birthday of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. We examine the rapid political and ideological developments within the philosophical and activist framework of the martyred Civil Rights leader during the last year of his life.

  • 01:48

    The Documentary Light Girls & Colorism in The African American Community

    in Culture

    Listen to The African History Network Show, Thursday, Jan. 22nd, 8:00pm-10:00pm EST with host Michael Imhotep.  We’ll discuss the documentary “Light Girls” & Colorism in The African American Community and much more.  Call in with your Questions/Comments at 914-338-1375.


    1) Florida police use images of Black Men for Target Practice.  What do you think about this?  2) We’ll discuss President Obama’s State of The Union Address. Did he say what you wanted to hear? 3)  Did you see the documentary “Light Girls” Monday night on OWN? What did you think of the documentary and “colorism” in the African American community?  4)  We’ll play excerpts of Michael Imhotep’s presentation “The Distortion of The Legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr: The Revolutionary Will Not Be Televised”.   Listen to the show at http://www.blogtalkradio.com/theafricanhistorynetworkshow/2015/01/23/the-documentary-light-girls-colorism-in-the-african-american-community or by phone LIVE at (914) 338-1375 or visit www.AfricanHistoryNetwork.com. Call in with your Questions/Comments at (914) 338-1375.
     

  • 02:59

    Pan-African Journal: Worldwide Radio Broadcast

    in Politics

    Listen to this edition of the Pan-African Journal hosted by Abayomi Azikiwe, editor of the Pan-African News Wire. The program highlights our PANW reports on developments in Africa surrounding the demonstrations by Muslims against a French satirical magazine and other issues. In the second hour we will examine the anti-war legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. as we continue our commemorations of the 86th anniversary of his birth. Finally, the broadcast in its final hour will feature the Pan-African Journal New York City version which aired originally over Community Progressive Radio on Jan. 12. This program is hosted by Abayomi Azikiwe and produced by Bernard White of CPRMetro.org

  • 00:31

    Wombanist Views Black Pervert Feature

    in Women

    Wombanist Views will sit down with documentary filmmakers TRUE and Bianca Laureano of TRUEstories productions, to speak about their groundbreaking documentary film project Black Pervert, which focuses not only the Black kink community, but on the issues of fetishism, racism, sexism, as well as the policing of sexuality; especially Black women’s sexuality.


     


    They are currently in production phase of the film, and we will be discussing the many ways that those who may be interested can get involved. This interview will surely be stimulating, interesting, and open. 


     


    Wombanist Views, created, produced, and co-hosted by Cherise Charleswell, is dedicated to broadcasting the voices of women who are doing positive and exciting things in their communities around-the-globe.


     

  • “Can African American Entertainers Be Effective Activists?”

    in Culture

    TONIGHT: Listen to The African History Network Show Thursday, Jan. 8th, 8:00pm-11:00pm EST with host Michael Imhotep. “Can African American Entertainers Be Effective Activists?”  Nicki Minaj recently did an interview explaining why some African American entertainers don’t speak out on our issues.  We’ll discuss this and more on tonight’s show.  Call in with your questions at (914) 338-1375.
     


    1) Phylicia Rashad (Claire Huxtable on “The Cosby Show”), did an interview with ABC World News on Wednesday clarifying a statement regarding the Bill Cosby scandal. I never said “forget those women”.  2) In Colorado, a bomb went off outside of NAACP office.  3) Asar Gray of G & G Associates will discuss Tax Tips for the 2015 Tax Season.  4) The movie “Selma” is drawing critical acclaim and also criticism for its portrayal of Pres. Lyndon Johnson.  Former Ambassador Andrew Young recently did an interview to set the record straight.  5) Michael Imhotep’s latest presentation is on the history of “Black Wall Street” in Tulsa, Oklahoma. We’ll share an excerpt of it on tonight’s show.  6) This date in African American History and Dr. George Washington Carver.


     


    Sign up for The African History Network email newsletter by texting the word "Kemet" to 22828.

    If you want to learn more about African History and African-American History to counteract the negative images we see of ourselves on the TEL-LIE-VISION (TV), please visit www.AfricanHistoryNetwork.com. We have information and DVDs to Educate, Empower and Inspire people of African Descent throughout the Diaspora and around the world.

  • 02:59

    Pan-African Journal: Special Worldwide Radio Broadcast

    in Politics

    Listen to this special broadcast of the Pan-African Journal hosted by Abayomi Azikiwe, editor of the Pan-African News Wire. This program features our regular PANW reports dealing with issues relevant to the concerns of African people and the international community in general. In the second hour we highlight writer Chi'Visual Arts, Falan Johnson, based in Dallas, who reads some of her work as well as reflections on factors motivating young publishers. Later we talk to Bluesologist Norman Otis Richmond of Toronto discussing the film "Selma," the anti-racist struggle in North America and the ongoing Canadian Broadcasting Corporation (CBC) television mini-series "The Book of Negroes." We continue the commemoration of the 86th birthday of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. examining his anti-war and social justice legacy leading up to his assassination in April 1968.

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