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Encore: The Doolittle Tokyo Raiders -Memorial Salute

  Broadcast in Entrepreneur

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The Doolittle Tokyo Raiders was the first U.S. air retaliation attack for the attack of Pearl Harbor. 
www.doolittleraider.com

Sergeant in Arms Brian Anderson joins us today to share with us this amazing history.

Since our original airing of our episode, these amazing men are finally set to be awarded the Congressional Gold Medal

The House of Representatives passed the bill last Monday 5/19. Read more on USA Today: http://usat.ly/1kDI4pY

The Doolittle Tokyo Raiders was a group eighty men from all walks of life who flew into history on April 18, 1942. They were all volunteers and this was a very dangerous mission. Sixteen B-25 bombers took off from the deck of the USS Hornet, led by (then Col.) Jimmy Doolittle. They were to fly over Japan, drop their bombs and fly on to land in a part of China that was still free. Of course, things do not always go as planned.

The months following the attack on Pearl Harbor were the darkest of the war, as Imperial Japanese forces rapidly extended their reach across the Pacific. Our military was caught off guard, forced to retreat, and losing many men in the fall of the Philippines, leading to the infamous Bataan Death March.

By spring, 1942, America needed a severe morale boost. The raid on Tokyo on April 18, 1942, certainly provided that – cheering the American military and public. Yet, the Doolittle Raid meant so much more, proving to the Japanese high command that their home islands were not invulnerable to American attacks and causing them to shift vital resources to their defense. Two months later that decision would play a role in the outcome of the Battle of Midway, the American victory that would begin to turn the tide in the Pacific War.

 

Tags:
The Doolittle Tokyo Raiders
pilots
aviation
WWII
history
USS Hornet
Jimmy Doolittle
Pearl Harbor
Memorial Day
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