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INDIE REVIEW RADIO/ CANDICE ANITRA /Indie Artist

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INDIE REVIEW RADIO

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Candice Anitra hates boxes. Not in a weird, pygmachophobia way. It’s the rigidly corrugated musical categories that both perplex and perturb her. So much so that at times, Candice likens her musical existence to feeling like a stranger on earth. Embodying the subtle rapture of Joan Armatrading, the robust confidence of Meshell Ndegeocello, and the thespian gender inquisition of Cheryl Dunye, the left-of-soul singer-songwriter has learned that it’s much easier to buck convention than to live a futile existence of the square peg in a round hole. Hailing from a planet called Philadelphia, the Brooklyn-based songstress was reared in a musical family rooted in the glorious sounds of the local church choir. However, many years passed before the impetus to find her voice struck. Candice set sail for New York University’s heralded Tisch School of the Arts after graduation and immersed herself in the fertile artistic environs of New York City. Enrolled in a self-scripting curriculum, Candice was molded into the image of a triple threat. Relishing the liberating new experience, Candice expanded her horizons and sharpened her talent as a writer with aplomb. In 2002, a post-collegiate Candice stumbled upon a musical outlet by assuming lead vocal duties for a local NYC band called True Story. By 2006, Candice had written a Dali-esque stage play centered on black women entitled The Ripple Effect. Candice’s most recent video, for the female powered anthem “Too Much Woman,” makes its own statement and has quickly reached thousands of views. Candice is currently working on her Big Tree album. Soon after the earthquake that shook Haiti on January 12, 2010, a photograph of a mountain of dead bodies gripped Candice Anitra to compose a song. On the second anniversary of the devastation, Candice released the track, "Today," with a video for the song, in order to raise still-much-needed funds to improve lives in Haiti.

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