Our Terms of Use and Privacy Policy have changed. We think you'll like them better this way.

Murderous Intellectuals: German Elites and the Nazi SS

  • Broadcast in Books
  • 0 comments
Pete Klein

Pete Klein

×  

Follow This Show

If you liked this show, you should follow Pete Klein.
h:6894
s:843348
archived
Pete talks to Jonathan Maxwell about his book - Murderous Intellectuals: German Elites and the Nazi SS American Book Publishing (2009) ISBN 9781589825635 Reviewed by Richard R. Blake for Reader Views (10/09) “Murderous Intellectuals: German Elites and the Nazi SS” is written as the result of Jonathan Maxwell’s keen interest in the history and background of World War II. Extensive reading from the writings of acclaimed authors like William Shirer, Simon Wiesenthal, and Ian Robertson fed his interest and influenced his conclusions regarding the desensitized values and actions of the social and political climate of the days preceding World War II in the world and of the Nazi SS in particular. Theories of the motivation behind the diabolical programs of death, destruction, and the barbaric behavior of these men and women of intellect take into account ten theories for consideration. They include a discussion looking at personal reasons, sadism, genetics, and Nationalism. Other Germans did nothing to combat the Nazi regime because of fear. Maxwell draws from the writings of Ian Robertson in his discussion of Nazi idealism, and the nature of German society, authoritarian government, and totalitarianism. He concludes: “The Nazi elites were motivated by simple evil, seduced by the desire of stature and as of personal fear.” He also maintains that: “Today’s Germans thoroughly repudiate both anti-Semitism and Fascism.” Maxwell provides an important analysis of the danger of a modern technology, stockpiling weapons, and the influence of the media in an atmosphere fired by hatred, deception and conspiracy. He talks about the conflicted and dual personalities of Nazi military leaders, scientists, lawyers, doctors, and educators of the SS their unsavory reputations, and their vindictiveness.

Comments

 comments