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SiGnOtHeTiMeS w Queen Tahiyrah Tonight's Audiobook Michelle Alexander NewJimCrow

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The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness a book by Michelle Alexander a civil rights litigator and legal scholar, published in 2010(The New Press). The book deals with race-related and social, political, and legal phenomena in the United States and attempts to apply the term 'The New Jim Crow' to the situation of African Americans in the contemporary United States. The name derives from the original Jim Crow laws that prevailed in the states of the former Confederacy of the U.S. through the 1960s. This book was on The New York Times Best Seller List ten consecutive months, and philosopherCornel West has called it a "secular bible for a new social movement in early twenty-first-century America." In the book Alexander deals primarily with the issue of the current mass levels of incarceration in the United States (with 5%of the world's population, U.S. incarcerates 25%of the world's prisoners) and what she perceives as societal repression of AfricanAmerican men and, to a lesser degree, Latino men. She discusses the social consequences of various policies for people of color, as well as for the US population as a whole. According to Alexander, the majority of black men in large American cities are "warehoused in prisons," their labor no longer needed in the globalized economy. Alexander maintains that many young black men, once they are labeled as "felons," become trapped in a second-class status that they find difficult to escape. The conventional point of view holds that discrimination has mostly ended with the Civil rights movement reforms of 1960s. Alexander claims the U.S. criminal justice system uses the “War on Drugs” as a primary tool for enforcing traditional, as well as new, modes of discrimination and repression.

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