Interviews by Bob Andelman


Judge David Young is unlike any other TV judge you’ve likely seen before.

In a video marketplace with courts of every color and gender and with their focuses ranging from petty crimes and divorce to Texas justice, the Judge David Young show has a gimmick that’s no gimmick.

Yep, he’s gay.

DOWNLOAD THE MP3; LISTEN RIGHT NOW!

ALSO AVAILABLE AS A PODCAST ON iTUNES.



BOB ANDELMAN/Mr. MEDIA: Judge, there’s out and then there’s in-your-living-room-five-nights-a-week out. How did you join the ranks of dispensers of video justice?

JUDGE DAVID YOUNG: Well, it’s very interesting. I was in my judicial chambers in Miami/Dade County, and I got an email from Sony Television asking me if I would like to talk to them about starring in a television show. And at first, I thought it was one of those emails that you get from Nigeria. I didn’t think it was real. And after I spoke to them, it was indeed real, and it’s been an amazing story actually. I’m just absolutely thrilled that I was able to do this.

ANDELMAN: It didn’t come entirely out of the blue. They had seen you, I guess, either in the news or in the flesh.

YOUNG: For me, it came out of the blue. Unbeknownst to me, Sony was looking for another judge to add to their “Supreme Court.” And they looked around, and they went to Court TV, one of their sources, because they figured they know all the good judges cause they cover these trials. I happen to have been the judge on the America West pilots, who were two guys that were flying an airplane impaired, six months after 9/11. And they said, “There’s this judge in Miami named David Young. Check him out,” and they obviously checked me out. They sent me the email. Then I called them. Then they flew me to New York. Then they flew me to California then back to New York. They went through the casting, and eighteen months later, you have “The Judge David Young Show.”

ANDELMAN: I remember that case, and people were quite alarmed by that case that these pilots were flying, as you put it, impaired. That seems like a kind way to put it. Was there anything in that case while you were handling it that stood out for you that made you think that it was different or that it got people’s attention any differently than any other case?

YOUNG: I knew from the get-go that the national media was going to cover the case because they made an inquiry to our public information director at the court, and I was going to make sure that I handled the case in a certain manner that would make people proud of the justice system. Far too often, on these big, high-profile trials, you have judges or lawyers or the whole scene cause a bad taste in people’s mouth about the justice system, and I was going to be gosh-darned if that was going to happen in my courtroom.





ANDELMAN: I’m in Florida. I’ve lived here for a long time. You came out of Florida. We both know that it gets more than its share of unusual court cases. Did that help you?

YOUNG: It’s funny. I’ve been asked several times, “How come you have three judges from South Florida on national television?” And I say it’s because we’re so culturally diverse in this community, and everything happens in South Florida, from Anna Nicole Smith dying to drunk pilots to Elian Gonzalez. We have this other case going on. It’s just exciting. They are people here with passion. And if you’re going to survive in this community, you have to have a certain umph, I guess, is the best way to put it, and I guess it just breeds us. I don’t know. It’s very exciting. Listen, I wouldn’t want to live anywhere else than South Florida because it is very exciting, and it’s very stimulating, and the people are just wonderful.

ANDELMAN: I seem to recall that during the Anna Nicole Smith case, and you probably know this better than I, that the judge who was handling a lot of that who got a lot of TV time, even during the course of the case, there was talk about him becoming a TV judge.

YOUNG: There was talk about it, but I don’t think anything’s going to come of that.

ANDELMAN: I wondered about that.

YOUNG: He’s still under criminal investigation.

ANDELMAN: Oh, I didn’t know that.

YOUNG: You didn’t know that? Yes, the state attorney’s office has reported in the Miami Herald and is investigating him for accepting bribes. According to the allegations, he told a lawyer, “My wife’s birthday is tomorrow, and I appoint you to a lot of cases, and there’s this great Louis Vuitton purse at Neiman-Marcus that she’d love to have and make sure it’s wrapped pretty.”

ANDELMAN: I missed that story. Wow.

YOUNG: For Larry Seidlin’s sake, I hope it’s not true, but the state attorney’s office is investigating. We’ll see what happens.

ANDELMAN: Let’s stay focused on Florida for a minute. Well, you mention the state attorney’s office. You came out of that office, didn’t you?

YOUNG: I did. I worked under Janet Reno for almost four wonderful years.

ANDELMAN: I have to ask: What was that like?

YOUNG: She is an amazing person. I was just with Janet last Friday night actually, and I said to her, “Every interview that I give, they’re so inquisitive about you, and you’re still so well regarded by so many different people.” What you see with Janet is what she is. She’s incredibly honest. She’s incredibly committed to seeking justice, and she’s also very loyal to her employees. Really truly indicative of Janet’s character, a story that I tell is one of our young prosecutors, who didn’t have any family here in Miami, in the middle of the night, got struck by something. I think she had appendicitis. Yeah, it was appendicitis, and she was rushed to the hospital. She told somebody to contact Janet Reno. Well, within ten minutes, Janet was at the hospital taking care of things. That’s just the way that Janet was. As a boss, she knew everybody’s names. She knew everybody’s life story, and she was very actively involved, and she was very protective of her people. You couldn’t ask for a better boss.






ANDELMAN: Is there anything that you carry forth from your experience with her, judicially, in terms of the way you handle people or cases?

YOUNG: Sure. One of Janet’s mantras, the terms “strength and courage,” which translated means always do the right thing and don’t be afraid of the consequences if you believe what you’re doing is right. Have the strength of your convictions. And her low-key style, her deliberate style, her ability to listen to people and really be concerned about people’s welfare. She’s one of my role models.

ANDELMAN: Janet Reno’s not the only major figure in Florida law establishment in your background. Your own dad, Burt Young, was past-president of the Florida Bar Association.

YOUNG: Yes. He was the first Jewish president of the Florida Bar back in the seventies. And the amount of anti-Semitism that he and mom both had to overcome within the membership of the Florida Bar establishment was astounding. You’d think that lawyers would rise above homophobia, anti-Semitism, racism, but they’re like everybody else. Dad had a really hard time in the beginning in 1970 when he took over the presidency, but slowly but surely, through hard work and dedication, and people saw that “Hey, Jews don’t have horns. Hey, Burton’s done all these great things to enhance the legal profession in the state of Florida. I guess we need to treat him like everybody else.” Gee, what a novel lesson that is.





ANDELMAN: You say that your dad dealt with anti-Semitism. How concerned was he for you following in his footsteps in the law and then having to deal with anti-gay attitudes and that kind of thing? That must’ve been tough.

YOUNG: My father and I, our personalities are very different, and he is very loyal. He’s a very loving father. I’m very, very lucky, and I have a very loving mother. When I came out, there was never any issue. They love me unconditionally. You wish most parents would love their children unconditionally, but unfortunately, we don’t see that a lot. We see a lot of misconceptions about gay and lesbian, and their parents think something, and they end up throwing them out of the house, and then they end up homeless on the streets, and then a lot of them end up committing suicide. One of the reasons I am out and one of the reasons I am vocal about it is I’d like to see myself as a role model for other young gay, lesbian, and bisexual individuals who are just coming to terms with their sexual orientation. To say hey, listen, if you want to be a judge, you can be a judge. If you want to be President of the United States, well, maybe not that far, but you can at least achieve your goals. And your sexual orientation should not prohibit you from achieving your goals cause that’s not what America’s all about. Hey, look, in Miami, we have people who came over here 30 years ago with nothing. They didn’t speak the language. All they had was a group of members of the Catholic Church who took them in and nourished them and acted as surrogate parents until their parents came over. And now they are the ones who are running Miami/Dade County. They’re the bankers. They’re the lawyers. They’re the mayors. There’s the United States Senator. So anything is possible. One’s sexual orientation should not prohibit that individual from striving to be the best that they can be.

ANDELMAN: You made reference to when you came out to your parents. A lot of times parents have one of two reactions. One, of course we know this one, they’re shocked, and they’re in denial. And then there’s the other reaction where they’re like I knew. Tell me something I didn’t know.

YOUNG: Right.

ANDELMAN: Which did you get from your parents?

YOUNG: Mom didn’t comment either way that she knew or she was shocked. She loves me, and that’s all there is to it. Dad was shocked.

ANDELMAN: Really?

YOUNG: It’s funny. He didn’t see it coming at all.

ANDELMAN: How old were you when you came out to them?

YOUNG: I was on the older side. I was 33, 34.

ANDELMAN: Wow. And dad didn’t see any sign at that point, huh?

YOUNG: None. As I say, my core of denial is not a river in Egypt, and it does not flow through this courtroom. Well, denial is a river in Egypt, and it was flowing through my parents’ house.

ANDELMAN: That is something I’ve heard you say a few times. And how does your dad feel about your career path now, the television?

YOUNG: Ever since I was three years old, I knew I wanted to be a lawyer. Ever since I was a teenager, I knew I wanted to practice criminal law cause I was influenced by Richard Gerstein, a former Dade County state attorney, Richard E. Gerstein. And I just love criminal law, and dad is a family lawyer. And I can be a little bit of a yenta, I understand that, but I just wasn’t into all the bickering and fighting and things that family lawyers do. I just really love the criminal end of it. Defending one’s constitutional rights, to me, is fascinating, and that doesn’t necessarily mean the defendant’s constitutional rights but the constitutional rights of the victims as well. It was just a natural progression that I merged into criminal law. Dad thought, I guess really in his mind, that I would be his law partner one day and then be president of the bar like he was. Well, it didn’t exactly happen because we had a judicial scandal here in 1990, early nineties, where we had judges who were taking bribes from lawyers to get cases fixed or to release the name of a confidential informant. Or they were putting pressure on lawyers to get part of their fee for appointment of cases. It really rocked the judiciary to its core down here, and a bunch of us young turks ran in 1992 to reform the system. There was a whole massive turnover in the judiciary, and there were a lot of young people who got elected. And I was only 33 when I got elected to a judgeship here in Miami, and we made a difference. We are the activists. We are the ones that are making differences in people’s lives. We’re the ones that were involved in therapudic of jurisprudence, the program, the drug programs, the alcohol programs, dealing with domestic violence, all the progressions in the law throughout the country. A lot of it started here in Miami with the young turks, as we called ourselves. My life has always been about public service, and dad was just thrilled when I became a judge. He loved having a son, the judge. He loved having to stand up in a room when I walked in.

ANDELMAN: What about on TV? How does he feel about you doing it on TV?

YOUNG: He never thought, I never thought…I never even fantasized about being one of those TV judges. I may fantasize about being on a Broadway show but never being on TV. I might fantasize about having the body of a Brad Pitt, but that’ll never happen either. I don’t have that genetic makeup. So when this whole thing happened, he’s been up to New York. He has me Googled. He knows everything that’s going on. He was able to act as, and he always does, as my legal advisor on all major matters and a parental advisor. He’s pretty good about separating the two. It’s been a very exciting time.

And my mom, she likes to put everything in frames. I’m convinced that, if I stand still for five minutes, she’d put me in a frame. She does decoupage. She decoupages all these frames. So she has all the stuff all over the house. She has her grandchildren and her son. My poor sister, there’re no pictures of her in the house, but that’s okay. She gave them the grandchildren so she has equal time that way.

ANDELMAN: I was just thinking about something you said a moment ago. You came out to your parents at 33. Was it coincidental that that was the year you were elected to the judgeship?

YOUNG: I came out I was closer to 34.

ANDELMAN: Okay.

YOUNG: No, it wasn’t coincidental. I read a book actually, and it was about this guy who was a founder of the Conservative movement in the United States, Marvin Liebman. And he was 70 years old, and he never found love. And a lot of people put so much effort into their careers that they forget that there’s another part of life, and that’s a personal, private life where we’re supposed to find happiness and contentment. And one without the other is not really making for a whole person. And I said to myself after reading this book, “I don’t want to be like this man. I don’t want to have to turn 70 years old and face the truth of what I am, what I was born as.” So I said now is the time.

Click Here to Keep Reading!

© 2007 by Bob Andelman. All rights reserved.


  1. Today's Best
  2. Top Shows
  3. Best of BTR
    1. Loading

      Keke Palmer’s Got the Voice

      Keke Palmer’s Got the Voice, the Moves and the Method

    2. HR Strategist Dethra Giles

      Tune into "the Conversation" when our guest will be “The Entrepreneur’s HR Strategist Dethra Giles. Dethra, the managing partner of ExecuPrep will be sharing HR tips to growing successful companies.

    3. Occult Master Lon Milo DuQuette

      Hear the spookiest tales in horror literature that secretly contain the answers to some of life's biggest mysteries. Dare to join us and Occult Master Lon Milo DuQuette.These stories will stay with you, haunting you from the shadows...eternally.

    4. Ickey Woods

      NFL Standard welcomes Ickey Woods, former fullback who played his entire NFL career (1988 to 1991) with the Cincinnati Bengals. He played college football at UNLV. He is best remembered for his "Ickey Shuffle" end zone dance, performed each time he scored.

    5. Constantine's Harold Perrineau

      That's Entertainment's host Tammy Jones-Gibbs will be talking with actor Harold Perrineau to talk about his new role on the new NBC supernatural series, "Constantine."

    6. Captain Lee Rosbach

      This week Host Peter Lamont talks to Captain Lee Rosbach, star of Bravo's hit show, Below Deck. Captain Lee will discuss leadership, the challenges of being the literal and figurative captain of the ship, his management style and more.

    7. Finding Your Joy

      Joy around the World! Join us with psychotherapist Kari Joys as she talks about the character traits of people from all over the world who have overcome adversity and found joy in everyday life.

    8. Lewis Howes

      BGERadio Presents: "The School of Greatness with Lewis Howes" Lewis Howes is an author, Lifestyle Entrepreneur, former pro athlete and world record holder in football. The goal of the School of Greatness is to share inspiring stories from the most bri

    9. The Courage To Be Man

      Chloe Taylor Brown, Glenn Barker and Dr. Marvin Thompson join together to elevate the lives of men and boys around the world by sharing the 4 dominate archetypes of men and the distinctions between having the courage to be a man or remaining an adult boy.

    10. The Biology of Intuition

      Sandie welcomes Simone Wright, author of First Intelligence, who will discuss the biological foundation of intuition, a first survival skill that develops long before we possess the ability to reason or learn anything the external world has to teach us.

    11. The Scientific Side of Howard Stern

      Howard Stern - A Scientific & Metaphysical Analysis

    12. The NFL Perspective

      On this edition of the Gridiron Gambling Report, BangTheBook.com writers Adam Burke and Cole Ryan hit the airwaves to discuss the NFL from a betting perspective.

    13. Director Lydia B. Smith

      Director Lydia B. Smith was inspired to make this film after completing her own Camino in the Spring of 2008. Four years later, after tirelessly fundraising for the necessary funds, the documentary is about to embark on its film festival run all over the globe.

    14. Hall of Fame QB Warren Moon

      This week Thursday Night Tailgate welcomes Hall of Fame QB Warren Moon, former Rams QB Vince Ferragamo, former Cowboys WR Terry Glenn, former Steelers Kicker Jeff Reed & WFAN contributing radio host Steve Kallas.

    15. WWE Champ Kane

      Kane- Former WWE Champion and current main event player in the WWE. He returns to the big screen to reprise his role of Jacob Goodnight in See No Evil 2. Listen in as we discuss the film and all things WWE

    16. Playing The Game

      Men and women sometimes give mixed signals it can be interpreted as “playing the game” when actually the person often takes it as a sign that they not at all interested and simply gives up.

    1. Loading

      Small Business Unstuck

      Host Barry Moltz gets small businesses unstuck. He has founded and run small businesses with a great deal of success and failure for more than 15 years. This is a business radio show where he shares all the craziness of small business. It’s that craziness that actually makes it exciting, interesting and totally unpredictable.

    2. The Halli Casser-Jayne Show

      Listeners get an earful on The Halli Casser-Jayne Show, Talk Radio for Fine Minds. Whether it’s the current political cocktail or the latest must-read award-winning book, Halli tackles all topics and likes to stir — and sometimes shakes — things up.

    3. America's Most Haunted

      Official Internet radio show of forthcoming epic paranormal investigation book by Eric Olsen and "Haunted Housewife" Theresa Argie.