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Comparison between marijuana and prescription drugs and which of them is better

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Peggy James

Peggy James

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Serious conversations started several decades ago in the United States around whether to legalize marijuana, and we took baby steps toward ratification with California’s Proposition 215 which voters passed by fifty-six percent in 1996, making medical marijuana permissible by law. Though we believed otherwise, medical-marijuana was and is not a new trend.

Medical scholars have been studying, using and writing about marijuana for a long time, leaving behind hundreds of journals written between 1840 and 1930 documenting marijuana-use as an acute pain reliever; and also to treat emaciation, neuralgia and convulsive disorders as well as nausea.

Legalizing marijuana will not increase its number of users; it will merely remove the threat of punishment for those who do.  For example, the man or woman who did not care for alcohol during prohibition did not suddenly develop a thirst for it when alcohol was legalized.

100 people die a day from prescription drug overdose, writes the Washington Post; and in comparison, there are no deaths attributed to marijuana overdose. Yet the drug that allegedly kills 100 people a day is legal, while medical marijuana is illegal.  

Does this mean prescription drugs are accepted because they are legal? And marijuana is illegal because no one has overdosed on it yet?

Dr. Sanja Gupta had this to say when making the comparison, “Most frightening to me is that someone dies in the United States every 19 minutes from a prescription drug overdose, mostly accidental. Every 19 minutes. It is a horrifying statistic. As much as I searched, I could not find a documented case of death from marijuana overdose.”

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